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Weetamoo
Wampanoag leader
Preceded by Corbitant
Personal details
Born Namumpum Weetamoo
1635 (1635)
present day North Tiverton, Rhode Island
Died August 6, 1676(1676-08-06) (aged 40–41)
Taunton, Massachusetts
Children Massasoit
Military service
Nickname(s)
  • Weetamoe
  • Wenunchus
  • Tatapanunum
Battles/wars King Philip's War

Weetamoo (c. 1635–1676), also referred to as Weetamoe, Wenunchus, Wattimore, Namumpum, and Tatapanunum, was a Pocasset Wampanoag Native American Chief. She was born in the Mattapoiset village of the Pokanoket and died at Taunton River. Her father was either Corbitant, sachem of the Pocasset tribe in present-day North Tiverton, Rhode Island, c. 1618–1630 or Passaconaway, a chieftain in the Pennacook.[1] She had five husbands, the most famous of whom was Wamsutta, the eldest son of Massasoit, grand sachem of the Wampanoag and participant in the first Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims.

According to the Tiverton Four Corners website, "the squaw sachem, Weetamoo" governed the Pocasset tribe, which occupied today's Tiverton, Rhode Island in 1620. Weetamoo joined "with King Philip in fighting the colonists" in 1680, in King Philip's War, also known as "Metacomet's Rebellion."[2]

Weetamoo's husbands[edit]

Weetamoo/Wenunchus was married five times.

  • Montowampate, sachem of Saugus, Massachusetts, was the first. He died shortly after their marriage.[1] (However, according to one legend, Weetamoo died before him, having been lost in her canoe on the icy Merrimack River when returning to Montowampate from the home of her father, who is given as Passaconaway rather than Corbitant.[3])
  • Chief Wamsutta was second. After his death, his brother Metacom (Philip) became Chief of the Wampanoag. The tribe allied with the English against the Narragansett, but the English broke this treaty. Wamsutta became sick and died during talks with the English. Believing that the English were somehow responsible for his death, Weetamoo and her brother-in-law, Metacomet— Wamsutta's younger brother and husband of Weetamoo's younger sister Wootonekanuske — attacked the English in June 1675. This began the conflict now known as King Philip's War.[citation needed]. Weetamoo is speculated to have had one child with Wamsutta, although the date of birth and name are unknown.
  • Quequequanachet was third. Little is known of him.
  • Petonowit was fourth. At the beginning of King Philip's War he sided with the English, prompting Weetamoo to leave their marriage.
  • Quinnapin was last, grandson of powerful Narragansett sachem Canonicus. He was described as "a handsome warrior". This seemed to be a strong marriage. The pair had at least one child together, who died in 1676.

Eventually, the English defeated the Wampanoag in August 1676. Weetamoo drowned in the Taunton River trying to escape. Her dead body was mutilated, and her head was displayed on a pole in Taunton, MA.[4][5]

She became chief because her father had no sons

Weetamoo's legacy[edit]

Weetamoo's adolescent life was made into a children's historical novel in The Royal Diaries series entitled Weetamoo, Heart of the Pocasetts: Rhode Island-Massachusetts, 1653.[6][7]

Weetamoo/Wattimore also appears in print in Mary Rowlandson's The Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson. Rowlandson, who was captured 1676 and held by Weetamoo's relative Quinnapin for three months, left a vivid description of Weetamoo's appearance as well as personality:

"A severe and proud dame she was, bestowing every day in dressing herself neat as much time as any of the gentry of the land: powdering her hair, and painting her face, going with necklaces, with jewels in her ears, and bracelets upon her hands. When she had dressed herself, her work was to make girdles of wampum and beads."[8]

Weetamoo Woods Open Space in Tiverton, Rhode Island is named after Weetamoo.[9] A 50-foot vessel, Weetamoo, built in 1902, "was named after the daughter of an Indian Chief in John Greenleaf Whittier's poem Bride of Penacook." The vessel served on Lake Sunapee for 25 years before being scuttled.[10] Lowell YWCA Camp Weetamoo is located on Long-Sought-for Pond in Westford, MA.[11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Beals, Charles Edward (1916). Passaconaway in the White Mountains. University of Wisconsin - Madison: R.G. Badger. p. 54. 
  2. ^ "Tiverton Four Corners, A Walking Tour". Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  3. ^ "Myths and Legends of our Own Land: The White Mountains: The Loss Of Weetamoo". Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  4. ^ Small, Dan. "What Exactly is a Weetamoo?". Friends of Lynn Woods, Lynn MA. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  5. ^ Sultzman, Lee. "Wampanoag History". First Nations Histories. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  6. ^ "An Interview with Patricia Clark Smith about Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets". Scholastic.com. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  7. ^ "Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets Discussion Guide". Scholastic.com. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  8. ^ ""A Severe and Proud Dame She Was": Mary Rowlandson Lives Among the Indians, 1675". History Matters. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  9. ^ "Recreation Department and Open Space Areas". Official Web Site of Tiverton, RI. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  10. ^ "Lake Sunapee History". Lake-Sunapee-Living.com. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  11. ^ "The Greater Lowell YWCA, One Hundred Years of Service and Advocacy 1891-1991". University of Massachusetts Lowell Center for Lowell History. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  12. ^ "Walter Cleven Obituary: Walter Cleven’s Obituary by the Lowell Sun.". Retrieved 2013-04-24. 

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weetamoo — Please support Wikipedia.
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45 news items

Vital VOICE

Vital VOICE
Mon, 19 Oct 2015 08:41:13 -0700

Weetamoo was a Pocasset Wampanoag Native American Chief. Known as the squaw-sachem or warrior-leader of the Pocassets. She joined with “King Philip” in fighting the colonists in 1680 Increase Mather described her as an enemy of similar or equal ...

The Providence Journal

The Providence Journal
Sat, 28 Feb 2015 21:15:48 -0800

Weetamoo was the sachem or chief of her people, the Pocassets, a tribe located in what is present-day Tiverton. Born around 1640, she was the daughter of Corbitant, the tribe's sachem. Upon his death, she became queen sachem. An able leader, she could ...

Seven Days

Seven Days
Wed, 29 Oct 2014 07:07:07 -0700

Mary, enslaved to the tribe's female leader, Weetamoo, witnesses the sachem wielding an authority over men that the goodwife never thought possible. And, despite the disembowelments and infant bashings she witnessed during the raid, Mary notes the ...

Wicked Local Saugus

Wicked Local Saugus
Thu, 08 Jan 2015 05:18:45 -0800

Episode 1: “The Burial of Penacook” depicted Passaconoway, the chief of the Pennacook N.H. Native American tribe who was the father of Weetamoo, the young maiden wooed by Montowampate, the Sachem of Saugus. In spite of her father's protests, she ...
 
Orlando Sentinel
Tue, 19 Feb 2013 07:21:39 -0800

... driveway of her Pine Hills home knowing what would come next. "My daughter stabbed me and I am going to die," she told Orange County Sheriff's deputies as they arrived at the 3800 block of Weetamoo Circle in the Silver Ridge neighborhood late ...
 
Broadway World
Mon, 28 Oct 2013 16:12:13 -0700

In 2006, she won a NYSCA award for her opera, "Queen of New England," about her royal ancestor Queen Weetamoo, King Philip's War and the Massachusetts Native American holocaust. From 2004 to 2008, she was Artist-in-Residence at School of Visual ...

Providence.thephoenix

Providence.thephoenix
Wed, 05 Dec 2012 16:01:14 -0800

You will after perusing Rhode Island Collection Drawer #279: "Weetamoo to Whipping." If card catalogs don't get your pulse pumping (what's wrong with you?), take a stroll across town, up the white marble stairs of the Rhode Island State House, through ...

New York Times

New York Times
Wed, 31 Oct 2007 00:00:00 -0700

For hikers, there are the five miles of wilderness trails through the Pardon Gray Preserve and neighboring Weetamoo Woods. Birders are drawn to the Emilie Ruecker Wildlife Refuge, which has one and a half miles of walking trails and is home to more ...
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