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"Teus" redirects here. For the Spanish-Filipino goalkeeper who played for Real Madrid, see Eduardo Teus. For the airport, see Te Anau Airport.
A 20-foot-long (6.1 m) ISO container equals 1 TEU.
Forty-foot containers stacked on top of two twenty-foot containers. These four containers represent 6 TEU.

The twenty-foot equivalent unit (often TEU or teu) is an inexact unit of cargo capacity often used to describe the capacity of container ships and container terminals.[1] It is based on the volume of a 20-foot-long (6.1 m) intermodal container, a standard-sized metal box which can be easily transferred between different modes of transportation, such as ships, trains and trucks.[1]

There is a lack of standardisation in regard to height, ranging between 4 feet 3 inches (1.30 m) and 9 feet 6 inches (2.90 m), with the most common height being 8 feet 6 inches (2.59 m).[2] Also, it is common to designate 45-foot (13.7 m) containers as 2 TEU, rather than 2.25 TEU.

Forty-foot equivalent unit[edit]

The standard intermodal container is designated as twenty feet long and 8 feet (2.44 m) wide.[1] Additionally there is a standard container with the same width but a doubled length of forty feet called a 40-foot container, which equals one forty-foot equivalent unit (often FEU or feu) in cargo transportation (considered to be two TEU, see below).

Load bearing of container stacking is at the 40-foot corner stone couplings.

In order to allow stacking of these types a forty-foot intermodal container has an exact length of 40 feet (12.192 m), while the standard twenty-foot intermodal container is slightly shorter having an exact length of 19 feet 10.5 inches (6.058 m). The twistlocks on a ship are put at a distance so that two standard twenty-foot containers have a gap of three inches which allows a single forty-foot container to be put on top.[citation needed]

The forty-foot containers have found wider acceptance, as they can be pulled by semi-trailer truck. The length of such a combination is within the limits of national road regulations in many countries, requiring no special permission. As some road regulations allow longer trucks, there are also variations of the standard forty-foot container — in Europe and most other places a container of 45 feet (13.72 m) may be pulled as a trailer. Containers with a length of 48 feet (14.63 m) or 53 feet (16.15 m) are restricted to road transport in the United States. Although longer than 40 feet, these variants are put in the same class of forty-foot equivalent units.

Container ships only take 40-foot and 20-foot containers below deck, plus 45-foot containers above deck. Ninety percent of the containers that container ships carry are 40-foot units. As container ships carry 90% of the world's freight, at least 81% of the world's freight moves via 40-foot containers.[citation needed]

The MV Emma Mærsk officially carries 11,000 TEU (14 tons gross each)[n 1]


TEU capacities for common container sizes
Length Width Height Volume TEU
20 ft (6.1 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) 1,360 cu ft (38.5 m3) 1[citation needed]
40 ft (12.2 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) 2,720 cu ft (77 m3) 2
45 ft (13.7 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) 3,060 cu ft (86.6 m3) 2 or 2.25
48 ft (14.6 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) 3,264 cu ft (92.4 m3) 2.4
53 ft (16.2 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) 3,604 cu ft (102.1 m3) 2.65
High cube
20 ft (6.1 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m) 1,520 cu ft (43 m3) 1[2]
Half height
20 ft (6.1 m) 8 ft (2.44 m) 4 ft 3 in (1.30 m) 680 cu ft (19.3 m3) 1[2]

As the TEU is an inexact unit, it cannot be converted precisely into other units. The related unit forty-foot equivalent unit, however, is defined as two TEU. The most common dimensions for a 20-foot (6.1 m) container are 20 feet (6.1 m) long, 8 feet (2.44 m) wide, and 8 feet 6 inches (2.59 m) high, for a volume of 1,360 cubic feet (39 m3). However, both 9-foot-6-inch-tall (2.90 m) High cube and 4-foot-3-inch (1.30 m) half height containers are also reckoned as 1 TEU.[2] This gives a volume range of 680 to 1,520 cubic feet (19 to 43 m3) for one TEU.

While the TEU is not itself a measure of mass, some conclusions can be drawn about the maximum mass that a TEU can represent. The maximum gross mass for a 20-foot (6.1 m) dry cargo container is 24,000 kilograms (53,000 lb).[5] Subtracting the tare mass of the container itself, the maximum amount of cargo per TEU is reduced to approximately 21,600 kilograms (47,600 lb).[5]

Similarly, the maximum gross mass for a 40-foot (12.2 m) dry cargo container (including the 9-foot-6-inch-high (2.90 m) cube container) is 30,480 kilograms (67,200 lb).[5] After correcting for tare weight, this gives a cargo capacity of 26,500 kilograms (58,400 lb).[5]

Twenty-foot, "heavy tested" containers are available for heavy goods such as heavy machinery. These containers allow a maximum weight of 67,200 pounds (30,500 kg), an empty weight of 5,290 pounds (2,400 kg), and a net load of 61,910 pounds (28,080 kg).[citation needed]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Maersk claims 14,780 TEU worth of space and a loading plan of 15,212 TEU.[3][4]


  1. ^ a b c Rowlett, 2004.
  2. ^ a b c d "Container Shipping". damovers.com. DaMovers.com. Archived from the original on 2008-03-27. Retrieved 2008-03-22. 
  3. ^ "Namegiving of newbuilding L 203". Odense Steel Shipyard. 2006-12-08. Archived from the original on July 13, 2007. 
  4. ^ Koepf, Pam (2006). "Overachievers We Love". Popular Science 269 (6): 24. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Shipping containers". Emase. Archived from the original on April 20, 2009. Retrieved 2007-02-10. 


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty-foot_equivalent_unit — Please support Wikipedia.
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1111 news items


Fri, 09 Oct 2015 02:00:00 -0700

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