digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

Tripadi (Kannada, lit. tri: three, pad or "adi": feet) is a native metre in the Kannada language dating back to c. 700 CE.

Definition[edit]

The tripadi consists of three lines, each differing from the others in the number of feet and moras (Sanskrit matras),[1] but in accordance with the following rules:

  • The first line has 4 feet, each with 5 moras, and a caesura at the end of the second foot.[1]
  • The 6th and 10th feet of the tripadi are each required to have the metrical pattern of a Brahma foot:

 -\smile \ \mathrm{or} \ \smile\smile\smile \ \mathrm{or} \ -- \ \mathrm{or} \ \smile\smile- \ \

where \smile (breve) denotes a short syllable, and - (macron) a long one.

  • The remaining feet have either 5 moras or 4, chosen to satisfy the rules of Nagavarma II:[1]

Line 1 20 moras in four feet
Line 2 17 moras in four feet
Line 3 13 moras in three feet.

Metrical structure[edit]

An example, of a possible scansion (metrical structure) of a tripadi, is given in (Kittel 1875, p. 98), where it is also stressed that it is not the form of the moras, but the number that is important. (Here * denotes a caesura)

 \overbrace{\smile \smile \smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 1}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 2}} \star \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 3}} | \overbrace{-\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 4}} (Line 1: 20 moras in 4 feet)

 \overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 5}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{--}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot VI}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 7}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 8}} (Line 2: 17 moras in 4 feet)

 \overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 9}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{--}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot X}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 11}} || (Line 3: 13 moras in 3 feet)

Another example (Kittel 1875, p. 99) is:

 \overbrace{\smile \smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 1}} | \overbrace{--\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 2}} \star \overbrace{\smile\smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 3}} | \overbrace{-\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 4}} (Line 1: 20 moras in 4 feet)

 \overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 5}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{-\smile}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot VI}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 7}} | \overbrace{-\smile\smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 8}} (Line 2: 17 moras in 4 feet)

 \overbrace{\smile \smile -\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 9}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{-\smile}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot X}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 11}} || (Line 3: 13 moras in 3 feet)

Example[edit]

A well-known example of the tripadi is the third stanza in the inscription of Kappe Arabhatta (here the symbol | denotes the end of a line, and ||, the end of the tripadi):

Sādhuge1a Sādhu1b mādhuryange1c mādhuryam1d |
bādhippa1e kalige2a kaliyuga2b viparītan2b |
mādhavan2c ītan2d peran2e alla2f ||

The literal translation of the tripadi is:[2]

To the good people,1a good;1b to the sweet,1c sweetness;1d |
causing distress1e

to the kali age,2a an exceptional man in Kaliyuga,2b |
Madhava (or Vishnu)2c this man,2d another2e is not2f||

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kittel 1875, p. 98, Narasimhia 1941, p. 383
  2. ^ Narasimhia 1941, pp. 346, 329, 323, 295, 286, 320, 278

References[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripadi — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

187 news items

The Hindu

The Hindu
Sun, 13 Mar 2016 19:01:12 -0700

Sarvagna Vachana Sanchaya – A collection of a total of 779 Sarvagna vachanas, of three lines each (tripadi) written by 16th century Kannada philosopher and pragmatist Sarvagna. Kumaravyasa Bharata – known as the Karnata Bharata Kathamanjari, a 15th ...

Indiatimes.com

Indiatimes.com
Sun, 06 Mar 2016 06:11:18 -0800

If the Ramayana, India's epic of epic proportions is essentially about struggle, then it seems fitting that an ambitous project to bring it to life on screen (yet again), involves struggle. Putting aside the complexity and attention to detail involved ...
 
Chandigarh Tribune
Thu, 04 Feb 2016 11:16:34 -0800

The hydrogel seeds of wheat and barley, which require around 60 per cent less water than usual ones, have been sown on a pilot basis in Dabodi, Tripadi, Machana and Jatola villages. “In south Haryana, especially in our area, water scarcity plagues ...
 
DailyO
Fri, 11 Sep 2015 03:07:30 -0700

For example, the Tamil venpa, the Japanese haiku and tanka, the Persian rubai, the Kannada tripadi and chatushpadi, the Urdu nazm, the Telugu chaatu padyam, the Marathi ovi, the Hindi doha, and the English limerick. Often they are exclusively ...

The Hans India

The Hans India
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 10:15:00 -0700

His aphoristic tripadi (three-lined) compositions serve as a source of wisdom and ethics. A special mention may be made of Honnamma, perhaps the first outstanding poetess in Kannada. Her Hadibadeya Dharma (Duty of a Devout Wife) is a compendium of ...
 
Roselle Park News
Thu, 01 May 2014 14:11:15 -0700

Additionally, Mr. Tripadi stated that if the Board did not grant the interpretation, then there would still be the use variance to hear and the hearing would continue. He said, “Just because you deny the interpretation, that doesn't mean you deny the ...

The New Indian Express

The New Indian Express
Sun, 21 Dec 2014 16:33:45 -0800

... capitals to create awareness about the natural product, the minister said. K C Venugopal MP presided over the function. Coir Board chairman Surendranath Tripadi, National Coir Training and Designing Centre assistant director A Radhakrishnan spoke.

Deccan Herald

Deccan Herald
Mon, 26 Jan 2015 10:33:45 -0800

Her work on ayurveda, Ayurvedamruta (which explains the use of ayurvedic plants in detail), and her self-composed tripadi (three-line verses) have been published by the foundation. The museum which is built adjacent to the wade displays a variety of ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight