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The Case for God
Author Karen Armstrong
Subject History of religions
Publisher Knopf
Publication date
2009
Pages 432
ISBN 978-0-307-26918-8

The Case for God is a 2009 book by Karen Armstrong. It is an answer to the recent atheism of Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris and Daniel Dennett and focuses on the three Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam from the paleolithic age to the present day. Also included are Buddhism and Hinduism.

Among the themes of the book are apophatic theology and intellectualism versus practice. Armstrong claims that the fundamental reality, later called God, Brahman, nirvana or Tao, transcends human concepts and thoughts, and can only be known through devoted religious practice.[1][2][3][4][5]

In 2009, the book was awarded the Dr. Leopold Lucas Prize by the University of Tübingen [6] in recognition of its contribution to the fields of theology, philosophy and intellectual history, and for improving international understanding and tolerance between faiths.

Synopsis[edit]

In the introduction, Armstrong presents two forms of knowledge, mythos and logos.[7] Since the 16th and 17th century, she says logos governed civilization, resulting in two phenomena: fundamentalism and atheism.[8] Armstrong says that the "new" atheists have made some valid criticisms of religion, stating "I can sympathize with the irritation of the new atheists". But maintains that they have focused primarily on fundamentalism. She says they "aren't radical enough" and finds their work "disappointingly shallow".[9] According to Armstrong, "My aim in this book is simply to bring something fresh to the table."[10]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "All quiet on the God front". The Guardian. 4 July 2009. Retrieved 2014-10-19. 
  2. ^ Byrnes, Sholto (16 July 2009). "The Case for God: What Religion Means By Karen Armstrong". New Statesman. Retrieved 2014-10-19. 
  3. ^ "Perpetual Revelations". New York Times. 1 October 2009. Retrieved 2014-10-19. 
  4. ^ "The Case for God: What Religion Really Means by Karen Armstrong". The Sunday Times. 5 July 2009. (subscription required (help)). 
  5. ^ Miller, Lisa (11 September 2009). "Out, Out, Damned Atheists: Karen Armstrong weighs in on God.". Newsweek. Retrieved 2014-10-19. 
  6. ^ "Lucas-Preis (Lucas-Prize)". Mohr Siebeck. Retrieved 2014-10-19. 
  7. ^ Armstrong, p. xi.
  8. ^ Armstrong, p. xv.
  9. ^ Armstrong, p. xvi.
  10. ^ Armstrong, p. xvii.

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Case_for_God — Please support Wikipedia.
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3 news items

 
Financial Times
Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:11:15 -0700

aren Armstrong, 69, is the author of numerous books on religion including A History of God, The Bible: A Biography and The Case for God. In 2008 she received Roosevelt Institute Four Freedoms Award and won the TED prize. What was your earliest ambition ...

Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald
Fri, 10 Oct 2014 18:46:07 -0700

Armstrong's subsequent career has been a superb riposte to those who wanted her mind and soul kept in a little box. In The Case For God, she writes: "Religion was never supposed to provide answers to questions that lay within the reach of human reason …

The Guardian

The Guardian
Wed, 08 Oct 2014 03:00:33 -0700

Fields of Blood follows A Short History of Myth, The Bible: A Biography and The Case for God. Its field of reference is mind-boggling. We start nearly 3,000 years before the birth of Christ, in Uruk, the world's first civilisation. There we learn how ...
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