digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

Sweden possessed overseas colonies from 1638 to 1663 and from 1784 to 1878.

The subject of this article was previously also known as Sweden. For other uses, see Sweden (disambiguation).
Swedish Colonial Empire
Svenska kolonier (Swedish)
1638–1663
1784–1878
Flag Coat of arms
Motto
I Gud mitt hopp
"In God my hope"
Anthem
Imperial anthem
Kungssången
"Song of the king!"
Map of the Swedish Empire with all of the territories that it possessed at different time periods shown together.
Capital Stockholm
Languages Official language:
Swedish
Regional languages:
Norwegian, Finnish, Estonian, Russian
Religion Official religion:
Lutheran
Minority religions:
Roman Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox Christian
Government Absolute monarchy by divine right
History
 -  Established 1638
 -  Disestablished 1878
Population
 -  1650 est. 2,200,000 
Currency Riksdaler
Today part of

List[edit]

The former Swedish colonies in Africa were:

The former Swedish colonies in America:

Americas[edit]

New Sweden[edit]

Main article: New Sweden
Map of New Sweden ca. 1650

By the middle of the 17th century, the Swedish Empire had reached its greatest territorial extent. The Swedes sought to extend their influence by creating an agricultural (tobacco) and fur trading colony to bypass French, British and Dutch merchants. The charter included Swedish, Dutch and German stockholders. Once they landed they established, Fort Christina (now Wilmington, Delaware), named after Queen Christina of Sweden. Many of the settlers were Finnish; since until 1809 Finland was governed as the eastern third of the kingdom of Sweden.

The settlement was actually an invasion of New Netherland since it was Dutch territory. The founder and first governor, Peter Minuit, had been Director-General of New Netherland from 1626 to 1633. Disgruntled after being dismissed from his post, he led a Swedish expedition to a location which he knew to be strategic as well as a thorn in the side of his former employers. Minuit died on a return trip from Stockholm in a hurricane near the Caribbean island of Saint Kitts. The colony would establish Fort Nya Elfsborg north of present-day Salem, New Jersey in 1643.

In May 1654 the Dutch Fort Casimir, located in present-day New Castle, Delaware was captured by New Sweden. As a reprisal, the Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant sent an army to the Delaware River, which obtained the surrender of the Swedish forts.

Antillian possessions[edit]

Saint Barthélemy is the only Caribbean island to have been historically a Swedish colony for any significant length of time, Guadeloupe only having been one briefly, at the end of the Napoleonic Wars.

As a result of Sweden's support of France's enemies during the Napoleonic Wars, the island of Guadeloupe was ceded to king Charles XIV John personally, not to his Swedish state. However a year later the island was given to France by the Treaty of Paris. Sweden then forced a settlement with Great Britain because it had been guaranteed the island which was strategically close to its other Caribbean colony. This led to the Guadeloupe Fund which guaranteed Sweden 24 million francs. Because of how the money was used, Sweden was then given an additional 300,000 Riksdaler under the Riksdag of 1815 every year. The last installment was paid in 1983.

In addition to these the Swedes briefly attempted to settle Tobago in 1733, but were driven away by native tribes, and Tobago was eventually claimed by the English.

Africa: Swedish Gold Coast[edit]

Main article: Swedish Gold Coast

Sweden temporarily controlled several settlements on the Gold Coast (present Ghana) since 22 April 1650, but lost the last when on 20 April 1663 Fort Carlsborg and the capital Fort Chistiansborg were seized by Denmark.

Cape Coast[edit]

In 1652, the Swedes took Cape Coast (in modern Ghana) which had previously been under the control of the Dutch and before that the Portuguese. Cape Coast was centered around the Carolusburg Castle which was built in 1653 and named after king Charles X Gustav of Sweden but is now known as the Cape Coast Castle.

The Swedish Atlantic slave trade[edit]

During this time the small Swedish slave trade began. However, after the fall of New Sweden to the Dutch, the slave trade ended. It would later be rejuvenated in 1784, when Sweden's monarch, Gustav III, began negotiations with France with a view to creating a new alliance between the two countries. Gustav offered Gothenburg as an entrepôt to the French, in exchange for the Caribbean colony of Saint Barthélemy, in addition to subsidies. Although Sweden was successful in acquiring the island in 1784, the population of the colony was less than 1000 people, and neither were particularly propitious trading ports—sugar and cotton only provided four shiploads a year, and many of the other resources were only produced in large enough quantities to provide subsistence for the inhabitants.[1]

However, the islands were close to the British and French trading posts of the Leeward and Windward islands. A new town was also constructed, Gustavia (named after the King), and this facilitated trade. Within a year, the population had doubled and the King saw fit to form the Swedish West India Company. The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) benefitted trade, as did the opening of free trade with Sweden in 1806; the population had continued to increase, reaching approximately 5000 by 1800. Discounting a brief period of British occupation from 1801 to 1802, the colonies continued to thrive. In 1811, 1800 ships visited Saint Barthélemy; and from October 1813 to September 1814, 20% of the U.S.'s exports passed through the island.[1]

The island was notable for its liberalism, particularly in regards to religious toleration. In Sweden, Lutheranism was strictly adhered to; people were obligated to attend a number of church services a year, and adherence to other religions or denominations was against the law (conversion to Catholicism, for example, often led to people being exiled). However, these two islands were inhabited by such a diverse group of people from European backgrounds, that French and English were also accepted official languages. On Saint Barthélemy, in 1787, only 21 Lutherans resided there, compared to over 500 Catholics, as well as several hundred people from different Protestant denominations. The government did not seek to suppress this: indeed, they ordered Saint Barthélemy's governor, Rosenstein, to salary a Catholic priest to come from Saint Martin twice a month.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kent, Neil (2008-06-12). A Concise History of Sweden. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 134–138. ISBN 0-521-01227-9. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_overseas_colonies — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
130 videos foundNext > 

Europa Universalis IV (Sweden) - Caribbean Colonies

Our overseas holdings expand into the Caribbean as we look to acquire the valuable trade goods of the sugar islands. Legal Stuff: Europa Universalis is Copyr...

Europa Universalis IV (Sweden) -Colonial Ambitions

With sweden supreme in scandanavia we begin to dream of overseas expansion, only to realise it's a very long way to america or africa. Legal Stuff: Europa Un...

Let's Play Europa Universalis 4 - Portugal Part 6

Victory my brothers! We have taken the war to Morocco and we have won! For the King! For the glory! For the trade to cover my overseas colonial expenses! Cop...

Let's Learn to Play Europa Universalis Castille Part 13 (Colony Spam Continues)

Castille continues to leave its focus on overseas provinces. After an alliance with Milan they get dragged into a few meddlesome wars that they can't be both...

Dr Jehan Perera (Obidient Servant to Colonial Masters) on the anti-Tamil riots of July 1983

Dr. Jehan Perera, an obidient servant to his Colonial masters is giving his views on anti-Tamil riots of July 1983. Anti-Tamil riots were reactions of Sinhal...

Chinese oversea students

Chinese oversea students.

World War I: Battle Of Falkland Islands 3/4

The first months of war at sea. Naval supremacy of the Royal Navy and its vulnerabilities to mine and submarine warfare. The seizure of German overseas colon...

Saint Pierre and Miquelon(French Overseas Territory/Territorio de Ultramar de Francia)

Saint-Pierre and Miquelon National Anthem Himno Nacional de San Pedro y Miguelón.

Argentina: "People Who Live on a Great Plain" 1928 DeVry School Films

more at http://news.quickfound.net/intl/argentina_news.html 'About settlement in Latin America (Argentine pampas); Buenos Aires city scenes.' Public domain f...

Colonialism

Colonialism is the establishment, exploitation, maintenance, acquisition, and expansion of colonies in one territory by people from another territory. It is ...

130 videos foundNext > 

We're sorry, but there's no news about "Swedish overseas colonies" right now.

Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Talk About Swedish overseas colonies

You can talk about Swedish overseas colonies with people all over the world in our discussions.

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!