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For other uses, see Sugar Bowl (disambiguation).
Sugar Bowl
Allstate Sugar Bowl
Sugar Bowl logo.svg
Allstate Sugar Bowl logo
Stadium Mercedes-Benz Superdome
Location New Orleans, Louisiana
Previous stadiums Tulane Stadium (1934–1974)
Georgia Dome (2006)[1]
Previous locations Atlanta, Georgia (2006)[1]
Operated 1935–present
Conference tie-ins

SEC (unofficial 1935–1975, official 1976–present)

Big 12 (2015–present)
Payout US$17,000,000 (As of 2006)
Sponsors
USF&G Financial Services (1988–1995)
Nokia (1996–2006)
Allstate Insurance (2007–present)
Former names
Sugar Bowl (1935–1987)
USF&G Sugar Bowl (1988–1995)
Nokia Sugar Bowl (1996–2006)
2014 matchup
Oklahoma vs. Alabama (Oklahoma 45–31)

The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Sugar Bowl has been played annually since January 1, 1935, and celebrated its 75th anniversary on January 2, 2009. The Sugar Bowl, along with the Orange Bowl and Sun Bowl, are the second-oldest bowl games in the country, behind the Rose Bowl.[2] The Sugar Bowl is also a member of the Bowl Championship Series. Presently, its official title is the Allstate Sugar Bowl after its current sponsor.

The Sugar Bowl has had a longstanding —albeit not exclusive— relationship with the Southeastern Conference (which once had a member based in New Orleans, Tulane University; another Louisiana school, Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, is still in the SEC today). From 1950 to 1995, only once did the Sugar Bowl not feature an SEC team. That relationship has been altered over the past twenty years due to conference realignments and the emergence of a series of coalitions and alliances intending to produce an undisputed national champion in college football, but the ties between the Sugar Bowl and the SEC have persisted and have recently been strengthened.

Starting in January 2015, the Sugar Bowl game will be in a three-year rotation with the Rose, Orange, Cotton, Peach, and Fiesta bowls where they'll host a semifinal game the first year and feature the SEC and Big 12 conference champions the next two,[3] an arrangement nearly identical with the relationship between the Rose Bowl and the champions of the Big Ten and Pac-12. Coincidentally, the SEC added two former Big 12 members in 2012 - Missouri and Texas A&M.

As a member of the Bowl Championship Series, the Sugar Bowl hosted the BCS National Championship Game twice (2000 and 2004). However, from the 2006 season to the 2013 season, the BCS National Championship Game had been a stand-alone event, following one week after the New Year's Day bowl games. This means that, under the now-defunct BCS format, no traditional bowl game hosted the BCS National Championship Game, but that game was played at the venue of one of those traditional major bowls, rotating amongst the four sites, including the Superdome.

The payout for the 2006 game was $14–17 million per participating team. According to Sports Illustrated, the 2007 salary for Sugar Bowl CEO Paul Hoolahan was $607,500.[4]

Sugar Bowl in Tulane Stadium in the 1940s

History[edit]

In 1890, Pasadena, California held its first Tournament of Roses Parade to showcase the city's mild weather compared to the harsh winters in northern cities. As one of the organizers said: "In New York, people are buried in snow. Here, our flowers are blooming and our oranges are about to bear. Let's hold a festival to tell the world about our paradise." In 1902, the annual festival was enhanced by adding a football game.[5]

2004 Sugar Bowl, Louisiana State University vs. Oklahoma; January 4, 2004

In 1926, leaders in Miami, Florida decided to do the same with a "Fiesta of the American Tropics" that was centered around a New Year's Day football game. Although a second "Fiesta" was never held, Miami leaders later revived the idea with the "Palm Festival" (with the slogan "Have a Green Christmas in Miami"). The football game and associated festivities of the Palm Festival were soon named the "Orange Bowl."[6]

In New Orleans, Louisiana, the idea of a New Year's Day football game was first presented in 1927 by Colonel James M. Thomson, publisher of the New Orleans Item, and Sports Editor Fred Digby. Every year thereafter, Digby repeated calls for action, and even came up with the name "Sugar Bowl" for his proposed football game.[7]

By 1935, enough support had been garnered for the first Sugar Bowl. The game was played in Tulane Stadium, which had been built in 1926 on Tulane University's campus (before 1871, Tulane's campus was Paul Foucher's plantation, where Foucher's father-in-law, Etienne de Bore, had first granulated sugar from cane syrup). Warren V. Miller, the first president of the New Orleans Mid-Winter Sports Association, guided the Sugar Bowl through its difficult formative years of 1934 and 1935.

Much controversy preceded the 1956 Sugar Bowl, when Bobby Grier's Pitt Panthers met the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. There had been controversy over whether Grier should be allowed to play, and whether Georgia Tech should even play at all due to Georgia governor Marvin Griffin's opposition to integration.[8][9][10]

In November 1967, Army's success on the field made them a strong candidate to be selected for the 1968 Sugar Bowl. However, Pentagon officials, in the midst of the Vietnam War, refused to allow the team to play what would have been the academy's first bowl game ever—citing the "heavy demands on the players' time" as well as an emphasis on football "not consistent with the academy's basic mission: to produce career Army officers."[11]

Superdome for the 2005 Sugar Bowl

Tulane Stadium hosted the game from 1935 through 1974. It has been played in the Louisiana Superdome since 1975. The Sugar Bowl's corporate title sponsor was USF&G Financial Services from 1987 to 1995 and Nokia cellular telephones of Finland from 1995 to 2006. In March 2006 Allstate Insurance was announced as the new title sponsor. ABC Sports televised the game from 1969 through 2006. Fox Sports televised the game from 2007 to 2009 as part of its contract with the BCS. ESPN will start airing the game with the 2010–11 season, after outbidding Fox for the broadcasting rights.[12]

The 2006 Sugar Bowl game was played at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia because of the extensive damage the Superdome suffered as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The Sugar Bowl has since returned to the refurbished Superdome.

Prior to the BCS, the game traditionally hosted the Southeastern Conference (SEC) champion against a top-tier at-large opponent. This was formalized in 1975, when the SEC champion was granted an automatic bid to the Sugar Bowl starting with the end of the 1976 season. This continued throughout the time of the Bowl Coalition, a precursor to the BCS. However, the Sugar Bowl agreed to release the SEC champion if necessary to force a national championship game. When the Bowl Coalition became the Bowl Alliance at the start of the 1995 season, Sugar Bowl would still allow the SEC champion to go to the national championship game if they were ranked in top two in the nation.

Under the now-defunct BCS format, the Sugar Bowl continued to host the SEC champion against a top-tier at-large opponent, unless the SEC champion went to the BCS National Championship Game.[13] When this happened, the Sugar Bowl usually selected the highest-ranked SEC team still available in the BCS pool. The SEC champion had been to the BCS title game since the end of the 2006 season through the 2013 season, the final year of the BCS.

The Sugar Bowl maintains an archive of past programs, images, newsreels, and other materials. The archive, originally housed in the Superdome, survived Hurricane Katrina, but a more secure home was needed. During the summer of 2007, the Sugar Bowl donated its materials to The Historic New Orleans Collection, designating it the permanent home of its archive.

2011 Sugar Bowl winner Ohio State vacated its Sugar Bowl victory over Arkansas in response to National Collegiate Athletic Association allegations over a memorabilia-for-cash scandal.[14]

The 2012 game, pitting the Michigan Wolverines against the Virginia Tech Hokies, was the first Sugar Bowl since 2000—and only the sixth since World War II—without an SEC team. Both of the SEC's BCS participants, Alabama and LSU, played in the National Championship Game, and under BCS rules only two teams per conference were eligible for BCS bowls.

In May 2012, the Big 12 and SEC announced plans to create a new bowl game, the Champions Bowl, that would play host to the champions of those two conferences.[15] However, by November 2012, it was decided instead that the Sugar Bowl will play host to the champions of the Big 12 and SEC, beginning in January 2015.[3] If one of those teams takes part in the national semifinal, a team from the same conference will take their place. Also, it will become one of the bowls that will rotate as a spot for a national semifinal game.

Game results[edit]

Italics denote a tie game

Annual Date Played Winning Team Losing Team
1st January 1, 1935 Tulane 20 Temple 14
2nd January 1, 1936 #4 TCU 3 #7 LSU 2
3rd January 1, 1937 Santa Clara 21 LSU 14
4th January 1, 1938 Santa Clara 6 LSU 0
5th January 2, 1939 #1 TCU 15 #6 Carnegie Tech 7
6th January 1, 1940 #1 Texas A&M 14 #5 Tulane 13
7th January 1, 1941 #4 Boston College 19 #6 Tennessee 13
8th January 1, 1942 #6 Fordham 2 #7 Missouri 0
9th January 1, 1943 #7 Tennessee 14 #4 Tulsa 7
10th January 1, 1944 Georgia Tech 20 Tulsa 18
11th January 1, 1945 #11 Duke 29 Alabama 26
12th January 1, 1946 #5 Oklahoma State 33 #7 Saint Mary's (CA) 13
13th January 1, 1947 #3 Georgia 20 #9 North Carolina 10
14th January 1, 1948 #5 Texas 27 #6 Alabama 7
15th January 1, 1949 #5 Oklahoma 14 #3 North Carolina 6
16th January 2, 1950 #2 Oklahoma 35 #9 LSU 0
17th January 1, 1951 #7 Kentucky 13 #1 Oklahoma 7
18th January 1, 1952 #3 Maryland 28 #1 Tennessee 13
19th January 1, 1953 #2 Georgia Tech 24 #7 Mississippi 7
20th January 1, 1954 #8 Georgia Tech 42 #10 West Virginia 19
21st January 1, 1955 #5 Navy 21 #6 Mississippi 0
22nd January 2, 1956 #7 Georgia Tech 7 #11 Pittsburgh 0
23rd January 1, 1957 #11 Baylor 13 #2 Tennessee 7
24th January 1, 1958 #7 Mississippi 39 #11 Texas 7
25th January 1, 1959 #1 LSU 7 #12 Clemson 0
26th January 1, 1960 #2 Mississippi 21 #3 LSU 0
27th January 2, 1961 #2 Mississippi 14 Rice 6
28th January 1, 1962 #1 Alabama 10 #9 Arkansas 3
29th January 1, 1963 #3 Mississippi 17 #6 Arkansas 13
30th January 1, 1964 #8 Alabama 12 #7 Mississippi 7
31st January 1, 1965 #7 LSU 13 Syracuse 10
32nd January 1, 1966 #6 Missouri 20 Florida 18
33rd January 2, 1967 #6 Alabama 34 #3 Nebraska 7
34th January 1, 1968 LSU 20 #5 Wyoming 13
35th January 1, 1969 #9 Arkansas 16 #4 Georgia 2
36th January 1, 1970 #13 Mississippi 27 #3 Arkansas 22
37th January 1, 1971 #4 Tennessee 34 #11 Air Force 13
38th January 1, 1972 #3 Oklahoma 40 #5 Auburn 22
39th December 31, 1972 #2 Oklahoma 14 #5 Penn State 0
40th December 31, 1973 #3 Notre Dame 24 #1 Alabama 23
41st December 31, 1974 #8 Nebraska 13 #18 Florida 10
42nd December 31, 1975 #3 Alabama 13 #7 Penn State 6
43rd January 1, 1977 #1 Pittsburgh 27 #4 Georgia 3
44th January 2, 1978 #3 Alabama 35 #9 Ohio State 6
45th January 1, 1979 #2 Alabama 14 #1 Penn State 7
46th January 1, 1980 #2 Alabama 24 #6 Arkansas 9
47th January 1, 1981 #1 Georgia 17 #7 Notre Dame 10
48th January 1, 1982 #10 Pittsburgh 24 #2 Georgia 20
49th January 1, 1983 #2 Penn State 27 #1 Georgia 23
50th January 2, 1984 #3 Auburn 9 #8 Michigan 7
51st January 1, 1985 #5 Nebraska 28 #11 LSU 10
52nd January 1, 1986 #8 Tennessee 35 #2 Miami 7
53rd January 1, 1987 #6 Nebraska 30 #5 LSU 15
54th January 1, 1988 #4 Syracuse 16 #6 Auburn 16
55th January 2, 1989 #4 Florida State 13 #7 Auburn 7
56th January 1, 1990 #2 Miami 33 #7 Alabama 25
57th January 1, 1991 #6 Tennessee 23 Virginia 22
58th January 1, 1992 #18 Notre Dame 39 #3 Florida 28
59th+ January 1, 1993 #2 Alabama 34 #1 Miami 13
60th January 1, 1994 #8 Florida 41 #3 West Virginia 7
61st January 2, 1995 #7 Florida State 23 #5 Florida 17
62nd December 31, 1995 #13 Virginia Tech 28 #9 Texas 10
63rd^ January 2, 1997 #3 Florida 52 #1 Florida State 20
64th January 1, 1998 #4 Florida State 31 #9 Ohio State 14
65th January 1, 1999 #3 Ohio State 24 #8 Texas A&M 14
66th* January 4, 2000 #1 Florida State 46 #2 Virginia Tech 29
67th January 2, 2001 #3 Miami 37 #7 Florida 20
68th January 1, 2002 #12 LSU 47 #7 Illinois 34
69th January 1, 2003 #4 Georgia 26 #16 Florida State 13
70th* January 4, 2004 #2 LSU 21 #1 Oklahoma 14
71st January 3, 2005 #3 Auburn 16 #8 Virginia Tech 13
72nd January 2, 2006 #11 West Virginia 38 #7 Georgia 35
73rd January 3, 2007 #4 LSU 41 #11 Notre Dame 14
74th January 1, 2008 #5 Georgia 41 #10 Hawaiʻi 10
75th January 2, 2009 #6 Utah 31 #4 Alabama 17
76th January 1, 2010 #5 Florida 51 #3 Cincinnati 24
77th January 4, 2011 #6 Ohio State 31 #8 Arkansas 26
78th January 3, 2012 #13 Michigan 23 #11 Virginia Tech 20
79th January 2, 2013 #21 Louisville 33 #3 Florida 23
80th January 2, 2014 #11 Oklahoma 45 #3 Alabama 31

+ Denotes Bowl Coalition Championship game

^ Denotes Bowl Alliance Championship game

* Denotes BCS National Championship Game

† Played in the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia

‡ Ohio State vacated its 31-26 victory over Arkansas due to NCAA sanctions

Most Outstanding Players (Miller-Digby Award)[edit]

Year played MVP Team Position
1948 Bobby Layne Texas QB
1949 Jack Mitchell Oklahoma QB
1950 Leon Heath Oklahoma FB
1951 Walt Yowarsky Kentucky T
1952 Ed Modzelewski Maryland FB
1953 Leon Hardemann Georgia Tech HB
1954 Pepper Rodgers Georgia Tech QB
1955 Joe Gattuso Navy FB
1956 Franklin Brooks Georgia Tech G
1957 Del Shofner Baylor HB
1958 Raymond Brown Mississippi QB
1959 Billy Cannon LSU HB
1960 Bobby Franklin Mississippi QB
1961 Jake Gibbs Mississippi QB
1962 Mike Fracchia Alabama FB
1963 Glynn Griffin Mississippi QB
1964 Tim Davis Alabama K
1965 Doug Moreau LSU FL
1966 Steve Spurrier Florida QB
1967 Ken Stabler Alabama QB
1968 Glenn Smith LSU HB
1969 Chuck Dicus Arkansas FL
1970 Archie Manning Mississippi QB
1971 Bobby Scott Tennessee QB
1972 Jack Mildren Oklahoma QB
1973 Tinker Owens Oklahoma FL
1974 Tom Clements Notre Dame QB
1975 Tony Davis Nebraska FB
1976 Richard Todd Alabama QB
1977 Matt Cavanaugh Pittsburgh QB
1978 Jeff Rutledge Alabama QB
1979 Barry Krauss Alabama LB
1980 Major Ogilvie Alabama RB
1981 Herschel Walker Georgia RB
1982 Dan Marino Pittsburgh QB
1983 Todd Blackledge Penn State QB
1984 Bo Jackson Auburn RB
1985 Craig Sundberg Nebraska QB
1986 Daryl Dickey Tennessee QB
1987 Steve Taylor Nebraska QB
1988 Don McPherson Syracuse QB
1989 Sammie Smith Florida State RB
1990 Craig Erickson Miami (Fla.) QB
1991 Andy Kelly Tennessee QB
1992 Jerome Bettis Notre Dame FB
1993 Derrick Lassic Alabama RB
1994 Errict Rhett Florida RB
1995 Warrick Dunn Florida State RB
1996 Bryan Still Virginia Tech WR
1997 Danny Wuerffel Florida QB
1998 E. G. Green Florida State WR
1999 David Boston Ohio State WR
2000 Peter Warrick Florida State WR
2001 Ken Dorsey Miami (Fla.) QB
2002 Rohan Davey LSU QB
2003 Musa Smith Georgia TB
2004 Justin Vincent LSU RB
2005 Jason Campbell Auburn QB
2006 Steve Slaton West Virginia RB
2007 JaMarcus Russell LSU QB
2008 Marcus Howard Georgia DE
2009 Brian Johnson Utah QB
2010 Tim Tebow Florida QB
2011 Terrelle Pryor Ohio State QB
2012 Junior Hemingway Michigan WR
2013 Teddy Bridgewater Louisville QB
2014 Trevor Knight Oklahoma QB

† Terrelle Pryor (QB, Ohio State) was ruled ineligible afterwards and his entire record was vacated from the 2010 season.

Appearances by team[edit]

Rank Team Appearances Record
1 Alabama 14 8-6
2 LSU 13 6-7
3 Florida 9 3-6
3 Georgia 9 4-5
5 Mississippi 8 5-3
6 Tennessee 7 4-3
6 Oklahoma 7 5-2
8 Florida State 6 4-2
8 Arkansas 6 1-4
10 Auburn 5 2-2-1
11 Georgia Tech 4 4-0
11 Nebraska 4 3-1
11 Miami 4 2-2
11 Notre Dame 4 2-2
11 Ohio State 4 2-2
11 Penn State 4 1-3
11 Virginia Tech 4 1-3
18 Pittsburgh 3 2-1
18 Texas 3 1-2
18 West Virginia 3 1-2
21 Santa Clara 2 2-0
21 TCU 2 2-0
21 Michigan 2 1-1
21 Missouri 2 1-1
21 Texas A&M 2 1-1
21 Tulane 2 1-1
21 Syracuse 2 0-1-1
21 North Carolina 2 0-2
21 Tulsa 2 0-2
30 Baylor 1 1-0
30 Boston College 1 1-0
30 Duke 1 1-0
30 Fordham 1 1-0
30 Kentucky 1 1-0
30 Louisville 1 1-0
30 Maryland 1 1-0
30 Navy 1 1-0
30 Oklahoma State 1 1-0
30 Utah 1 1-0
30 Air Force 1 0-1
30 Carnegie Tech 1 0-1
30 Cincinnati 1 0-1
30 Clemson 1 0-1
30 Hawai'i 1 0-1
30 Illinois 1 0-1
30 Rice 1 0-1
30 Saint Mary's (CA) 1 0-1
30 Temple 1 0-1
30 Virginia 1 0-1
30 Wyoming 1 0-1

Broadcasting[edit]

In recent years, television broadcast rights to the Sugar Bowl have been part of the BCS contract. From 1999-2006, the game aired on ABC as part of its BCS package, where it had also been televised from 1969 through 1998. The Sugar Bowl was the only Bowl Alliance game to stick with ABC following the 1995, 1996 and 1997 seasons; the Fiesta and Orange Bowls were televised by CBS. Prior to that, NBC aired the game for several years. From 2006 to 2010, Fox broadcast the game, while ESPN picked up the Sugar Bowl after picking up the rest of the BCS beginning in the 2009-2010 season.[12] For 2013, ESPN Deportes introduced a Spanish language telecast of the game.[16]

In November 2012, ESPN announced that it had reached a deal to maintain broadcast rights to the Sugar Bowl through 2026. ESPN will pay $55 million yearly to broadcast the game beginning in the 2014-15 season under the new contract, which will take effect following the conclusion of ESPN's contract with, and subsequent discontinuation of the BCS. ESPN made a similar deal to maintain broadcast rights to the Orange Bowl following the discontinuation of the BCS as well.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Temporarily relocated because of damage from Hurricane Katrina
  2. ^ "Sugar Bowl". NokiaSugarBowl.com. Retrieved 6 January 2009. 
  3. ^ a b "New Orleans to host Big 12-SEC game". ESPN. 2012-11-07. Retrieved 2012-11-15. 
  4. ^ Murphy, Austin, and Dan Wetzel, "Does It Matter?", Sports Illustrated, 15 November 2010, p. 45.
  5. ^ "Tournament of Roses History". Pasadena Tournament of Roses. Retrieved 5 December 2006. 
  6. ^ "History of the Orange Bowl". FedEx Orange Bowl. Archived from the original on 3 November 2006. Retrieved 5 December 2006. 
  7. ^ "Sugar Bowl History". Allstate Sugar Bowl. Archived from the original on 23 February 2007. Retrieved 5 December 2006. 
  8. ^ Mulé, Marty - A Time For Change: Bobby Grier And The 1956 Sugar Bowl. Black Athlete Sports Network, December 28, 2005
  9. ^ *Zeise, Paul - Bobby Grier broke bowl's color line. The Panthers' Bobby Grier was the first African-American to play in Sugar Bowl Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, October 07, 2005
  10. ^ Thamel, Pete - Grier Integrated a Game and Earned the World's Respect. New York Times, Published: January 1, 2006.
  11. ^ (http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=aRUwAAAAIBAJ&sjid=xjUDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4279,1834709&dq=sugar-bowl+controversy&hl=en)
  12. ^ a b Fox pulls out of bidding for next round of BCS games
  13. ^ = 27 November "Selection Procedures". BCS. Retrieved 2006. 
  14. ^ = 8 July "Ohio State vacating Sugar Bowl win, other 2010 victories". WWL-TV. Retrieved 2011. 
  15. ^ "SEC, Big 12 use bowl game deal to get leverage in BCS playoff - Stewart Mandel - SI.com". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. 2012-05-18. Retrieved 2012-09-11. 
  16. ^ "BCS National Championship and Bowl Games on ESPN Deportes". ESPN. Retrieved 24 December 2012. 
  17. ^ "ESPN Reaches 12-Year College Football Agreement With Orange Bowl". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_Bowl — Please support Wikipedia.
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Forbes

Forbes
Thu, 20 Nov 2014 14:45:59 -0800

Playoff standings are likely to change over the final two weeks of the season, but Alabama is currently in prime position for Sugar Bowl contention, where College Football Playoffs tickets on the secondary market have already reached record-breaking ...
 
The Times-Picayune - NOLA.com
Thu, 20 Nov 2014 09:03:45 -0800

The Division III and IV 2014 Allstate Sugar Bowl / LHSAA swimming championships wrap up on Thursday, Nov. 20, and NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune will provide live updates as the action unfolds. Session 2 of the Division IV meets begins at 9:30 a.m. and ...
 
Tahoe Daily Tribune
Thu, 20 Nov 2014 17:52:30 -0800

Even before Sugar Bowl became a ski resort, celebrities were drawn to Mt. Lincoln. Here, silent film star Charlie Chaplin and crew were at the Donner Summit peak to film his masterpiece, "The Gold Rush," which is still revered as one of the greatest ...

RantSports

ESPN (blog)
Tue, 18 Nov 2014 16:56:15 -0800

How important is earning the top overall seed in the College Football Playoff? For Alabama, it's very important. It would allow the Tide to play a virtual home game in the Sugar Bowl as opposed to going out West to possibly face Oregon in the Rose Bowl.
 
The Keene Sentinel
Wed, 19 Nov 2014 10:22:30 -0800

The 62nd annual Shrine Maple Sugar Bowl game will be played in 2015 at Castleton State in Castleton, Vt., bowl officials announced Tuesday. Dartmouth College, home to the game most years from 1958-2014, is starting a stadium renovation project after ...
 
The Times-Picayune - NOLA.com
Sat, 08 Nov 2014 13:56:15 -0800

The fact that Isabella Hemb won the girls' individual title at the Allstate Sugar Bowl New Orleans Metro Cross Country Championship is no surprise – in picking up the win, the junior ends her season undefeated on the City Park course. Usually, her wins ...
 
KTVN
Tue, 11 Nov 2014 15:26:15 -0800

Sugar Bowl Resort and Royal Gorge Cross Country will host a job fair on Sunday, November 16th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Mt. Judah Lodge at Sugar Bowl. Resort representatives say multiple departments are hiring including food & beverage, ticket ...
 
Dallas Morning News
Tue, 18 Nov 2014 18:31:08 -0800

Here are this week's College Football Playoff rankings. The top four teams will advance to two semifinal matches: The Rose Bowl and the Sugar Bowl, played on Jan. 1, 2015. The winners of the semifinals will play Jan. 12, 2015, at AT&T Stadium in Arlington.
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