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"Memorabilia" redirects here. For other uses, see Memorabilia (disambiguation).
For other uses, see Souvenir (disambiguation).
Eiffel Tower souvenirs
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A souvenir stall in London, England

A souvenir (from French, for a remembrance or memory),[1] memento, keepsake, or token of remembrance[1] is an object a person acquires for the memories the owner associates with it. A souvenir can be any object that can be collected or purchased and transported home by the traveler as a memento of a visit. While there is no set minimum or maximum cost that one is required to adhere to when purchasing a souvenir, etiquette would suggest to keep it within a monetary amount that the receiver would not feel uncomfortable with when presented the souvenir. The object itself may have intrinsic value, or simply be a symbol of past experience. Without the owner's input, the symbolic meaning is invisible and cannot be articulated.[2]

Souvenir salesman, 4th of July. Washington, D.C.

Souvenirs as objects[edit]

The tourism industry designates tourism souvenirs as commemorative merchandise associated with a location, often including geographic information and usually produced in a manner that promotes souvenir collecting. Throughout the world, the souvenir trade is an important part of the tourism industry serving a dual role, first to help improve the local economy, and second to allow visitors to take with them a memento of their visit, ultimately to encourage an opportunity for a return visit, or to promote the locale to other tourists as a form of word-of-mouth marketing.[3] Perhaps the most collected souvenirs by tourists are photographs as a medium to document specific events and places for future reference.[2]

Souvenirs as objects include mass-produced merchandise such as clothing: T-shirts and hats; collectables: postcards, refrigerator magnets, miniature figures; household items: mugs, bowls, plates, ashtrays, egg timers, spoons, notepads, plus many others.

Symbol as souvenir from Chefchaouen, Morocco

Souvenirs also include non-mass-produced items like folk art, local artisan handicrafts, objects that represent the traditions and culture of the area, non-commercial, natural objects like sand from a beach, and anything else that a person attaches nostalgic value to and collects among his personal belongings.[4]

A more grisly form of souvenir in the First World War was displayed by a Pathan soldier to an English Territorial. After carefully studying the Tommy's acquisitions (a fragment of shell, a spike and badge from a German helmet), he produced a cord with the ears of enemy soldiers he claimed to have killed. He was keeping them to take back to India for his wife.[5]

Souvenirs as memorabilia[edit]

Souvenir Album of Houston, 1891

Similar to souvenirs, memorabilia (Latin for memorable (things), plural of memorābile) are objects treasured for their memories or historical interest; however, unlike souvenirs, memorabilia can be valued for a connection to an event or a particular professional field, company or brand.

Examples include sporting events, historical events, culture, and entertainment. Such items include: clothing; game equipment; publicity photographs and posters; magic memorabilia; other entertainment-related merchandise & memorabilia; movie memorabilia; airline[6][7] and other transportation-related memorabilia; and pins, among others.

Often memorabilia items are kept in protective covers or display cases to safeguard and preserve their condition.

Souvenirs as gifts[edit]

In Japan, souvenirs are known as omiyage (お土産?), and are frequently selected from meibutsu, or products associated with a particular region. Bringing back omiyage from trips to co-workers and families is a social obligation, and can be considered a form of apology for the traveller's absence.[8] Omiyage sales are big business at Japanese tourist sites.

Travelers may buy souvenirs as gifts for those who did not make the trip.

In the Philippines a similar tradition of bringing souvenirs as a gift to family members, friends, and coworkers is called pasalubong.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Online Etymology Dictionary". etymonline.com. 
  2. ^ a b "Museum of the personal: the souvenir and nostalgia". byte-time.net. 
  3. ^ The Design and Development of Tourist Souvenirs in Henan
  4. ^ "About me". Souvenir Finder. 
  5. ^ Reagan, Geoffrey: Military Anecdotes (1992), Guinness Publishing, p. 20, ISBN 0-85112-519-0
  6. ^ "Aviation and Airline Memorabilia". Collectors Weekly. 
  7. ^ "airline memorabilia - Bing". bing.com. 
  8. ^ "Omiyage Gift Purchasing By Japanese Travelers in the U.S.". acrwebsite.org. 

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souvenir — Please support Wikipedia.
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2597128 news items

Telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph.co.uk
Fri, 04 Sep 2015 06:52:30 -0700

It's high time someone shook up the multi-million pound souvenir industry, snow globes and all. While the rest of the world goes loco for all things local, tourism has been sadly slow to see the value in craft and design – preferring in the main to ...
 
Tampabay.com (blog)
Thu, 03 Sep 2015 12:41:15 -0700

There's good news for those who went home empty handed from the inverted pyramid farewell. RELATED NEWS/ARCHIVE. Hold the Mangroves on St. Pete waterfront. St. Petersburg officials had said they would distribute 250 brick pavers stamped with an ...

USA TODAY

USA TODAY
Fri, 28 Aug 2015 10:30:57 -0700

It's a good thing Pope Francis has a sense of humor. After all, what would a pontiff with a less jovial bent – his predecessor, Pope Benedict, perhaps? – think of the 10-inch "Pope Francis Plush Doll," priced at $20 (plus tax and shipping), being ...
 
Minneapolis Star Tribune
Fri, 28 Aug 2015 08:13:10 -0700

Sports souvenir shop next to Metrodome is moving St. Louis Park. Sporting goods store that sat next to old Metrodome is moving. By John Ewoldt Star Tribune. August 29, 2015 — 7:42am. Gallery Grid. Prev 1/10 Next. A construction worker walks past Dome ...

Leicester Tigers (press release)

Leicester Tigers (press release)
Fri, 04 Sep 2015 00:40:49 -0700

Saturday's souvenir guide includes profiles of the Leicester Tigers and Los Pumas squads, a welcome from the Tigers and special thank-you from Marcos as well as a selection of images from notable events during his testimonial year. Pick up your copy ...

Northern Star

Northern Star
Wed, 02 Sep 2015 16:48:45 -0700

YOU can show your support for the Ballina Seagulls in the NRRRL grand final this weekend by picking up a copy of Saturday's Northern Star for our special souvenir lift-out poster. Fans can pull the poster out of the paper and take it along to Sunday's ...

Detroit Free Press

Detroit Free Press
Sat, 29 Aug 2015 20:11:15 -0700

It's the top half of the all-white road uniforms that Michigan will debut Thursday night at Utah. "I just liked them," coach Jim Harbaugh said of the 1974-inspired look (via mgoblue.com). "There's really not that much to peel the onion back on with ...

FOXSports.com

FOXSports.com
Thu, 27 Aug 2015 07:45:19 -0700

We've seen plenty of video of fans doing crazy things to get a foul ball, but this one is special. During last night's Giants game, we were treated to one guy's journey to the souvenir that was filled with hijinks. He starts by mixing it up with ...
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