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Solar eclipse of July 22, 1990
SE1990Jul22T.png
Map
Type of eclipse
Nature Total
Gamma 0.7597
Magnitude 1.0391
Maximum eclipse
Duration 2m 33s
Coordinates 65.2N 168.9E
Max. width of band 201 km
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse 3:03:07
References
Saros 126 (46 of 72)
Catalog # (SE5000) 9487

A total solar eclipse occurred on July 22, 1990. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across the surface of the Earth, while a partial solar eclipse will be visible over a region thousands of kilometres wide.

Related eclipses[edit]

Solar eclipses 1990-1992[edit]

Each member in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the moon's orbit.

Solar eclipse series sets from 1990–1992
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Saros Map
121 January 26, 1990
SE1990Jan26A.png
Annular
126 July 22, 1990
SE1990Jul22T.png
Total
131 January 15, 1991
SE1991Jan15A.png
Annular
136
Eclipse CR 1991 a zoom.jpg
July 11, 1991
SE1991Jul11T.png
Total
141 January 4, 1992
SE1992Jan04A.png
Annular
146 June 30, 1992
SE1992Jun30T.png
Total
151 December 24, 1992
SE1992Dec24P.png
Partial

Saros 126[edit]

It is a part of Saros cycle 126, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on March 10, 1179. It contains annular eclipses from June 4, 1323 through April 4, 1810 and hybrid eclipses from April 14, 1828 through May 6, 1864. It contains total eclipses from May 17, 1882 through August 23, 2044. The series ends at member 72 as a partial eclipse on May 3, 2459. The longest duration of central eclipse (annular or total) was 5 minutes, 46 seconds of annularity on November 22, 1593. The longest duration of totality was 2 minutes, 36 seconds on July 10, 1972.[1]

Series members 39-49 occur between 1901 and 2100:

39 40 41
SE1918Jun08T.png
June 8, 1918
SE1936Jun19T.png
June 19, 1936
SE1954Jun30T.png
June 30, 1954
42 43 44
SE1972Jul10T.png
July 10, 1972
SE1990Jul22T.png
July 22, 1990
SE2008Aug01T.png
August 1, 2008
45 46 47
SE2026Aug12T.png
August 12, 2026
SE2044Aug23T.png
August 23, 2044
SE2062Sep03P.png
September 3, 2062
48 49
SE2080Sep13P.png
September 13, 2080
SE2098Sep25P.png
September 25, 2098

Metonic cycle[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days).

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Solar_Saros_series_126, accessed October 2010

References[edit]

Photos:


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