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Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians
Total population
522[1]
Regions with significant populations
United States United States (California California)
Languages
Luiseño, English, and Spanish,
Religion
Traditional tribal religion, Christianity
Related ethnic groups
other Luiseño tribes, Ajachmem (Juaneño),[2] Cupeño, Cahuilla, Serrano, Gabrielino-Tongva, and Chemehuevi[3]

The Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Cahuilla and Luiseño people, headquartered in Riverside County, California. On June 18, 1883, the Soboba Reservation was established by the United States government in San Jacinto, California.[4]

History[edit]

Contact and change[edit]

The Luiseño Indians first encountered Europeans acting as missionaries, and the Luiseno allowed them to come through their community because they were literate.[citation needed] Writers passed through the San Jacinto valley where the Luiseňo were settled and recorded much of their culture, and along with missionaries and soldiers were a part of the 1776 Juan Bautista de Anza expedition overland to and through Las Californias sponsored by Spanish monarchy. took the Luiseňo homeland and claimed it theirs for the San Antonio de Pala Asistencia cattle rancho.

According to Father Jose Sanchez: "Proceeding in the same direction, we stopped at Jaguara, so called by the natives, but by our people San Jacinto. This is the rancho for the cattle of Mission San Luis Rey de Francia, distant from Temecula about eleven or twelve leagues."

Soboba reservation[edit]

The reservation was given back to the Luiseňo after the United States Government took control of California. An Executive Order established the Soboba reservation June 19, 1883.

Community[edit]

The members of the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians have built a self-sustaining community. Their work includes agriculture and entertainment. Because of the businesses that they created, the economy of Soboba is strong.[5] The tribe has built their own schools, including Noli Indian School, which serves grades twelve.[6] They have also created non-profit organizations and a charity with the money they have made from all of their business.

Accomplishments and economy[edit]

Agriculture[edit]

The Soboba began their economy with agriculture, starting with apricots. Over time, they developed the land and the land surrounding the reservation. The members of the tribe worked their way outside of their own community and started working in the citrus industry. This agricultural industry allowed them to build their economy and expand.

Soboba Casino[edit]

Soboba Casino, 2007, with earlier design inset

The Soboba established a casino to earn profits. Their advantage was given to them because of California gambling laws. They were able to operate a casino as long as it stayed on their reservation. This casino is a premier gaming spot in California for many. The location of the casino is another great advantage because it is about 100 miles outside of Los Angeles, California. Many people from all over California come to the casino. Soboba Casino is the biggest source of income for the tribe, and continues to grow every day.

Entertainment attractions[edit]

Soboba has also developed a country club, which hosts golf tournaments and has a condominium resort. This resort opened May 2008 and holds the Soboba Golf Classic, which is a major golf tournament in California. This is another great source of income for the tribe.[7]

Tribal government[edit]

Enrollment[edit]

Membership of the tribe is determined only by birth. Although a member is not required to live or be born on the reservation, they still must be a descendant of another member. Being a member of the tribe entitles one to voting rights for the government of the tribe.

Hierarchy[edit]

The government is administered by five tribal council members. The tribal chairman is the highest position of power and is elected by a popular vote of other members from the tribe. The vice chairwoman, secretary, treasurer, and member at large are put into position by demand of the elected council. The tribal government makes business decisions and laws for the Soboba reservation. Elections are held like general elections in the United States, and absentee ballots are available upon prior approval.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "California Indians and Their Reservations: P. SDSU Library and Information Access. (retrieved 24 Dec 2010)
  2. ^ Hinton, 28-9
  3. ^ Crouthamel, S. J. "Luiseño Ethnobotany." Palomar College. 2009 (retrieved 24 Dec 2010)
  4. ^ Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians.
  5. ^ "Tribal Economy." Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians. (retrieved 24 Dec 2010)
  6. ^ "Soboba Celebrates." Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians. (retrieved 24 Dec 2010)
  7. ^ "Country Club." Soboba Casino. (retrieved 24 Dec 2010)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°46′39″N 116°52′52″W / 33.77750°N 116.88111°W / 33.77750; -116.88111


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soboba_Band_of_Luiseno_Indians — Please support Wikipedia.
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1 news items

Press-Enterprise

Press-Enterprise
Fri, 04 Apr 2014 13:23:00 -0700

If not for a $100,000 donation from the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians in 2009, the doors could have closed on the Ramona Pageant. There were negotiations with Riverside County to take over operations of the facility that same year, but those never ...
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