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For the Naglfar album, see Sheol (album).

She'ol (/ˈʃl/ SHEE-ohl or /ˈʃəl/ SHEE-əl; Hebrew שְׁאוֹל Šʾôl), in the Hebrew Bible, is a place of darkness to which all the dead go, both the righteous and the unrighteous, regardless of the moral choices made in life, a place of stillness and darkness cut off from life and from the Hebrew God.[1]

The inhabitants of Sheol are the "shades" (rephaim), entities without personality or strength.[2] Under some circumstances they are thought to be able to be contacted by the living, as the Witch of Endor contacts the shade of Samuel for Saul, but such practices are forbidden (Deuteronomy 18:10).[3]

While the Old Testament writings describe Sheol as the permanent place of the dead, in the Second Temple period (roughly 500 BC–70 AD) a more diverse set of ideas developed. In some texts, Sheol is considered to be the home of both the righteous and the wicked, separated into respective compartments; in others, it was considered a place of punishment, meant for the wicked dead alone.[4] When the Hebrew scriptures were translated into Greek in ancient Alexandria around 200 BC, the word "Hades" (the Greek underworld) was substituted for Sheol, and this is reflected in the New Testament where Hades is both the underworld of the dead and the personification of the evil it represents.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rainwater 1996, p. 819
  2. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 188
  3. ^ Knobel 2011, pp. 205–206
  4. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 189
  5. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 189

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Sheol entry in Jewish Encyclopedia

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol — Please support Wikipedia.
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706 news items

First Things (blog)

First Things (blog)
Thu, 23 Apr 2015 05:00:00 -0700

“The dead do not praise Yahweh, nor do any who do down into silence” (Psalm 115:17). It's a refrain in the Psalms: Death marks the end of the life of praise. The dead cannot give thanks to God. Sheol isn't just dark; it's silent. But then Revelation ...
 
PJ Media
Fri, 10 Apr 2015 04:43:57 -0700

The Athanasian Creed of at least a century later is more explicit, Christ “descended into hell.” Depending on context and translation Jesus either journeyed to Sheol, Hades, or Hell. But allowing for differences in language Christianity held—and ...
 
Philippine Star
Sat, 18 Apr 2015 08:56:15 -0700

In the interim, the dead went to Sheol, the netherworld, where they were cut-off from God and the world of the living. They had no concept on the individual resurrection for the simple reason that no one before Jesus had ever resurrected from the dead.
 
Christian Daily
Tue, 07 Apr 2015 14:45:00 -0700

Details about Sheol could be found throughout the Bible — "It is under the earth (Numbers 16:30–33), and it is like a city with gates (Isaiah 38:10) and bars (Job 17:16). It is a land of darkness, a place where shades, the shadowy souls of men, dwell ...
 
American Muslim
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 08:33:45 -0700

The word for it was Sheol. Not the blissful dwelling of the righteous, filled with heavenly rewards, but a place of darkness and destruction. A dismal land of silence from which God is absent. The dead in Sheol are forgotten, they lie beyond God's care.

Salon

Salon
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 01:30:54 -0700

The Athanasian Creed of at least a century later is more explicit, Christ “descended into hell.” Depending on context and translation Jesus either journeyed to Sheol, Hades, or Hell. But allowing for differences in language Christianity held—and ...

Patheos (blog)

Patheos (blog)
Thu, 02 Apr 2015 12:07:30 -0700

As I and many others have written, in the Bible, Hell is a very loose concept and not really talked about all that much. The only scripture Jesus had, the Old Testament (which is about 60% of the Bible), doesn't mention Hell at all, only Sheol – the ...

GetReligion (blog)

GetReligion (blog)
Sat, 11 Apr 2015 11:21:32 -0700

The Athanasian Creed of at least a century later is more explicit, Christ “descended into hell.” Depending on context and translation Jesus either journeyed to Sheol, Hades, or Hell. But allowing for differences in language Christianity held – and ...
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