digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

For the Naglfar album, see Sheol (album).
The parable of the Rich man and Lazarus depicting the rich man in hell asking for help to Abraham by James Tissot

She'ol (/ˈʃl/ SHEE-ohl or /ˈʃəl/ SHEE-əl; Hebrew שְׁאוֹל Šʾôl), in the Hebrew Bible, is a place of darkness to which all the dead go, both the righteous and the unrighteous, regardless of the moral choices made in life, a place of stillness and darkness cut off from life and from the Hebrew God.[1]

The inhabitants of Sheol are the "shades" (rephaim), entities without personality or strength.[2] Under some circumstances they are thought to be able to be contacted by the living, as the Witch of Endor contacts the shade of Samuel for Saul, but such practices are forbidden (Deuteronomy 18:10).[3]

While the Old Testament writings describe Sheol as the permanent place of the dead, in the Second Temple period (roughly 500 BC–70 AD) a more diverse set of ideas developed. In some texts, Sheol is considered to be the home of both the righteous and the wicked, separated into respective compartments; in others, it was considered a place of punishment, meant for the wicked dead alone.[4] When the Hebrew scriptures were translated into Greek in ancient Alexandria around 200 BC, the word "Hades" (the Greek underworld) was substituted for Sheol, and this is reflected in the New Testament where Hades is both the underworld of the dead and the personification of the evil it represents.[5]

Judaism[edit]

According to Herbert C. Brichto, writing in Hebrew Union College Annual,[6] the family tomb is the central concept in understanding biblical views of the afterlife. Brichto states that it is "not mere sentimental respect for the physical remains that is...the motivation for the practice, but rather an assumed connection between proper sepulture and the condition of happiness of the deceased in the afterlife".

According to Brichto, the early Israelites apparently believed that the graves of family, or tribe, united into one, and that this unified collectivity is to what the Biblical Hebrew term Sheol refers, the common Grave of humans. Although not well defined in the Tanakh, Sheol in this view was a subterranean underworld where the souls of the dead went after the body died. The Babylonians had a similar underworld called Aralu, and the Greeks had one known as Hades. For biblical references to Sheol see Genesis 42:38, Isaiah 14:11, Psalm 141:7, Daniel 12:2, Proverbs 7:27 and Job 10:21,22, and 17:16, among others. According to Brichto, other Biblical names for Sheol were: Abaddon (ruin), found in Psalm 88:11, Job 28:22 and Proverbs 15:11; Bor (the pit), found in Isaiah 14:15, 24:22, Ezekiel 26:20; and Shakhat (corruption), found in Isaiah 38:17, Ezekiel 28:8.[7]

Most Jewish ideas about the after-life developed in postbiblical times. The Hebrew Scriptures themselves have few references to existence after death. Sheol, the grave, is portrayed as the place of the dead, but Sheol is a metaphor for oblivion and not an actual place where the dead "live" and retain consciousness. The notion of resurrection appears in two late biblical sources, Daniel 12 and Isaiah 25-26.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rainwater 1996, p. 819
  2. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 188
  3. ^ Knobel 2011, pp. 205–206
  4. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 189
  5. ^ Longenecker 2003, p. 189
  6. ^ The Hebrew Union College Annual is an annual peer-reviewed academic journal in the field of Jewish and historical studies. It was established in 1924 and is published by the Hebrew Union College.
  7. ^ Herbert Chanon Brichto "Kin, Cult, Land and Afterlife – A Biblical Complex", Hebrew Union College Annual 44, p.8 (1973)
  8. ^ Life After Death - My Jewish Learning - Retrieved 10 July 2014.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Sheol entry in Jewish Encyclopedia

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

736 news items

 
Patheos (blog)
Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:33:45 -0700

The word that the psalmist uses, Sheol, (Hebrew for “shĕ'owl”) can mean the underworld, grave, hell, or a pit and it doesn't matter whether it is in the grave or in a pit or even in hell, God is present everywhere at all times. The psalmist asks the ...

Jerusalem Post Israel News

Jerusalem Post Israel News
Wed, 17 Jun 2015 09:52:30 -0700

A Hungarian Holocaust film relies on the imagination of viewers to reconstruct a collective tragedy that cannot be reconstructed visually. Lászlo Nemes Géza Röhrig. 'Son of Saul' director Lászlo Nemes (left) together with lead actor Géza Röhrig during ...

Gallipolis Daily Tribune

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Thu, 23 Jul 2015 12:18:45 -0700

If I make my bed in Sheol, You are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there Your hand shall lead me, and Your right hand shall hold me. If I say, 'Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the ...

Cowger Nation

Cowger Nation
Sun, 19 Jul 2015 20:49:11 -0700

Since the Bible declares that “absent from the body is present with the Lord” (for believers) and Sheol (for unbelievers), it's not possible for the yet living to interact with the spirits of the deceased. So, that leaves angelic beings or God's Spirit ...
 
WEBCommentary
Mon, 13 Jul 2015 14:45:00 -0700

What in the name of Sheol does his having reproduce have to do with any of this? A social media status update posted by the Western Journalism Center read “'Like' if you think we need a candidate like Ronald Reagan in the White House." But didn't Regan ...
 
Patheos (blog)
Mon, 10 Sep 2012 04:15:00 -0700

Scholars and laypeople have engaged in significant debate about the precise meaning of the word/name “Sheol” in the Bible. At times it seems to be an underworld, at times simply the grave, and at times perhaps something else. A student in my class on ...
 
Christian Daily
Tue, 07 Apr 2015 14:45:00 -0700

Details about Sheol could be found throughout the Bible — "It is under the earth (Numbers 16:30–33), and it is like a city with gates (Isaiah 38:10) and bars (Job 17:16). It is a land of darkness, a place where shades, the shadowy souls of men, dwell ...

Il Sole 24 Ore

Il Sole 24 Ore
Tue, 21 Jul 2015 00:50:10 -0700

Continua il braccio di ferro che a Palermo vede contrapposti il governatore dem, Rosario Crocetta, autosospesosi dall'incarico dopo le polemiche sulle presunte intercettazioni tra lui e il suo medico Matteo Tutino, e il suo stesso partito. Il Pd è ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight