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Sexual arousal disorder is characterized by a lack or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity in a situation that would normally produce sexual arousal, or the inability to attain or maintain typical responses to sexual arousal. The disorder is found in the DSM-IV.[1] The condition should not be confused with a sexual desire disorder.

The term is often used in the diagnosis of women (female sexual arousal disorder), while the term erectile dysfunction (ED) is often used for men.

Signs and symptoms[edit]

In women, the symptoms of the disorder include:

However, whether lack of physiological arousal is a reliable symptom of the disorder is questionable. Research has shown that women with arousal deficits and women without arousal deficits show equivalent increases in physiological response during experience of erotic stimuli.[2][3]

Causes[edit]

Contrary to popular belief, the disorder is not always caused from a lack of sexual arousal. Possible causes of the disorder include psychological and emotional factors, such as depression, anger, and stress; relationship factors, such as conflict or lack of trust; medical factors, such as depleted hormones, reduced regional blood flow, and nerve damage; and drug use. The lack of sexual arousal may be due to a general lack of sexual desire or due to a lack of sexual desire for the current partner (i.e., situational). A person may always have had no or low sexual desire or the lack of desire may have been acquired during the person's life.

Diagnosis[edit]

A psychologist will first consider any psychological or emotional problems; while a sex therapist will examine relationship issues; after which a medical doctor will investigate medical causes for the disorder.

Treatment[edit]

Depending on the cause of the disorder, hormone therapy or a blood-flow enhancing medication, like Viagra, may be appropriate.

Bremelanotide (formerly PT-141) is being studied in clinical tests to increase sexual desire in women. Preliminary results have proven its efficacy. However, development was temporarily suspended due to a side effect of increased blood pressure observed in a small number of subjects who administered the drug intra-nasally. In 2009, Palatin, the company developing the drug, announced positive results without heightened blood pressure effects after a phase I study using a new subcutaneous method of administration.[4]

References[edit]

See also[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_arousal_disorder — Please support Wikipedia.
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1 news items

Yahoo News

Yahoo News
Mon, 22 Sep 2014 23:44:33 -0700

Constantly aroused Amanda Gryce can orgasm uncontrollably up to FIFTY times a day after suffering with rare condition Persistent Sexual Arousal Disorder for over a decade. Once at the edge of despair Amanda, 24, is now turning her life around after ...
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