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Romanesco
Fractal Broccoli.jpg
Romanesco, showing its self-similar form
Species Brassica oleracea
Cultivar group Botrytis cultivar group

Romanesco broccoli, also known as Roman cauliflower, Broccolo Romanesco, Romanesque cauliflower or simply Romanesco, is an edible flower bud of the species Brassica oleracea. First documented in Italy, it is chartreuse in color. Romanesco has a striking appearance because its form is a natural approximation of a fractal. When compared to a traditional cauliflower, its texture as a vegetable is far more crunchy,[according to whom?] and its flavor is not as assertive, being delicate and nutty.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Romanesco was first documented in Italy (as broccolo romanesco, that is, "from Rome"). It is sometimes called broccoflower, but that name has also been applied to green cauliflower cultivars.[citation needed]

Description[edit]

The Romanesco superficially resembles a cauliflower, but it has a visually striking fractal form

Romanesco superficially resembles a cauliflower, but it is chartreuse in color, and its form is strikingly fractal in nature. The inflorescence (the bud) is self-similar in character, with the branched meristems making up a logarithmic spiral. In this sense the bud's form approximates a natural fractal; each bud is composed of a series of smaller buds, all arranged in yet another logarithmic spiral. This self-similar pattern continues at several smaller levels. The pattern is only an approximate fractal since the pattern eventually terminates when the feature size becomes sufficiently small. The number of spirals on the head of Romanesco broccoli is a Fibonacci number.[1]

Nutritionally, romanesco is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, dietary fiber and carotenoids.[citation needed]

The causes of its differences in appearance from the normal cauliflower and broccoli have been modeled as an extension of the preinfloresence stage of bud growth, but the genetic basis of this is not known.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ron Knott (30 October 2010). "Fibonacci Numbers and Nature". Ron Knott's Web Pages on Mathematics. Archived from the original on 10 January 2015. 
  2. ^ Martin Kieffer; Michael P. Fuller; Anita J. Jellings (July 1998). "Explaining Curd and Spear Geometry in Broccoli, Cauliflower and 'Romanesco': Quantitative Variation in Activity of Primary Meristems". Planta 206 (1): 34–43. doi:10.1007/s004250050371. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanesco_broccoli — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

301 news items

The Telegraph

The Telegraph
Tue, 09 Feb 2016 18:48:45 -0800

1 head romanesco broccoli. 1 teaspoon lemon zest. 2 sprigs fresh rosemary. 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes. 1 cup grated Parmesan, plus more for topping. 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, toasted. Salt and pepper. Serves six. Fill a large stock pot halfway with ...

Nashville Scene

Nashville Scene
Mon, 11 Jan 2016 14:54:06 -0800

Stephen Trageser: It's not Michelin-grade cooking, but I roasted a whole chicken for the first time, and I am proud. It cost less than a three-pack of breasts, took about the same amount of time to cook, and I'll be eating on it for a week. Next week ...

Visalia Times-Delta

Visalia Times-Delta
Wed, 03 Feb 2016 16:00:00 -0800

Next time you are at the Farmers Market, keep an eye out for the green variety known as broccoflower (because it looks like broccoli) or look for green romanesco broccoli, which is actually a green cauliflower that comes in spiky instead of round curds.

Inverse

Inverse
Thu, 31 Dec 2015 15:10:23 -0800

In The Force Awakens, the twisted green snack served to Rey in Maz Kanata's pirate castle looks decidedly alien. Look a bit closer and you'll discover it's actually a terrestrial native: Romanesco broccoli. Not that it makes a difference where it comes ...

Telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph.co.uk
Fri, 05 Feb 2016 10:17:18 -0800

'I wake every morning at 7am to a view of the Empire State Building,' April Bloomfield says, 'which is a nice way to start the day.' Understatement, it quickly transpires, is a habit of Bloomfield's. One of New York's most-loved cooks, crowned Best ...

Business 2 Community

Business 2 Community
Wed, 20 Jan 2016 12:06:44 -0800

This is where ad servering technology come into play for you as a publisher. The ad server manages all your advertisers in one place and then “serves” the highest paying ad for every user. cha ching. What's the ugly? This – Romanesco Broccoli. Nothing ...
 
Modern Farmer
Mon, 22 Dec 2014 11:43:18 -0800

Did you notice the chartreuse, psychedelic spines of Romanesco broccoli during its very short season at the farmers market? If you looked closely, you would have seen just how remarkable this vegetable really is. Like a snowflake, this broccoli ...

Phoenix New Times (blog)

Phoenix New Times (blog)
Fri, 13 Mar 2015 06:07:30 -0700

Don't be surprised if Romanesco starts popping up on metro Phoenix menus. This crazy-looking vegetable is quickly becoming a farmers market favorite, and plenty of local growers would love to put it on your table. Here's a brief introduction to what it ...
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