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R136a3
The young cluster R136.jpg
R136a3 is the bright star at lower left of the center.
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Dorado
Right ascension 05h 38m 42.33s
Declination −69° 06′ 03.3″
Apparent magnitude (V) 12.97
Characteristics
Spectral type WN5h
Details
Mass 135[1] M
Luminosity ~3,200,000[2] L
Temperature 53,000[citation needed] K
Database references
SIMBAD data

R136a3 is a Wolf–Rayet star in R136, a massive star cluster located in Dorado. It is located near R136a1, the most massive and luminous star known. R136a3 masses at 135 M[1] and shines at 3.2 million times brighter than the Sun.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Crowther, P. A.; Schnurr, O.; Hirschi, R.; Yusof, N.; Parker, R. J.; Goodwin, S. P.; Kassim, H. A. (2010). "The R136 star cluster hosts several stars whose individual masses greatly exceed the accepted 150 M stellar mass limit". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 408 (2): 731. arXiv:1007.3284. Bibcode:2010MNRAS.408..731C. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17167.x.  edit
  2. ^ a b Hainich, R.; Rühling, U.; Todt, H.; Oskinova, L. M.; Liermann, A.; Gräfener, G.; Foellmi, C.; Schnurr, O.; Hamann, W. -R. (2014). "The Wolf-Rayet stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud". Astronomy & Astrophysics 565: A27. arXiv:1401.5474. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201322696.  edit



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The most massive star ever discovered: R136a

R136a was once thought to be a hypergiant star of about 1500 solar masses, 32 million times as bright as the Sun, with a surface temperature of 55--60000 K and about 50 million miles in diameter....

 
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