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The Computer security Portal

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Computer security is anything that has to do with protecting computer systems such as smartphones, desktop computers, company servers, IP phones, set-top boxes, etc. from spam, viruses, worms, trojan horses, malware and intrusion. It is defined as methods and technologies for deterrence, protection, detection, response, recovery and extended functionality in information systems.

Selected article

The jdbgmgr.exe virus hoax involved an e-mail spam in 2002 that advised computer users to delete a file named jdbgmgr.exe because it was a computer virus. jdbgmgr.exe, which had a little teddy bear-like icon (The Microsoft Bear), was actually a valid Microsoft Windows file, the Debugger Registrar for Java (also known as Java Debug Manager, hence jdbgmgr).

Featuring so odd an icon among normally dull system icons had an unexpected counterpoint: an email hoax warning users that this is a virus that somehow came into your computer and should be deleted. This hoax has taken many forms and is always very popular among non-expert users that find this icon suspicious.

The email has taken many forms, including saying its purpose was to warn Hotmail users of a virus spreading via MSN Messenger, or even to alert about a possible virus in the orkut web community. All say that it was not detected by McAfee or Norton AntiVirus, which is obviously true.

This email in fact could be considered some kind of virus as it has all the normal life cycle of computer virus: It comes through user mailboxes, harm the system (by deleting a file) and then the message is forwarded to multiple recipients to reinfect them. Only that all those commands are executed by the user himself, making it a failproof virus (c.f. honor system virus).

More...

Selected picture

Beast, a Windows-based backdoor Trojan horse

Beast, a Windows-based backdoor Trojan horse.

Selected biography

Bruce Schneier (born January 15, 1963, pronounced "shn-EYE-er") is an American cryptographer, computer security specialist, and writer. He is the author of several books on computer security and cryptography, and is the founder and chief technology officer of BT Counterpane, formerly Counterpane Internet Security, Inc.

Schneier's Applied Cryptography is a popular reference work for cryptography. Schneier has designed or co-designed several cryptographic algorithms, including the Blowfish, Twofish and MacGuffin block ciphers, the Helix and Phelix stream ciphers, and the Yarrow and Fortuna cryptographically secure pseudo-random number generators. Solitaire is a cryptographic algorithm developed by Schneier for use by people without access to a computer, called Pontifex in Neal Stephenson's novel Cryptonomicon. In October 2008, Schneier, together with seven others, introduced the Skein hash function family, a more secure and efficient alternative to older algorithms. [1]

More...

Did you know...

Related portals

Computer security news

Categories

Computer security topics

For further info feel free to visit http://www.virusradar.com/

Things you can do

  • Pages Needing Attention:Software
  • Design an icon for Computer Security
  • Find image of any security related software for Selected Picture that isn't copyrighted.

WikiProjects

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Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Computer_security — Please support Wikipedia.
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4216 news items

 
The Republic
Sun, 20 Apr 2014 07:07:48 -0700

COLUMBIA, South Carolina — South Carolina may spend $27 million next fiscal year on continued efforts to secure taxpayers' personal data and provide another year of credit protection following the 2012 hacking at the state's tax-collection agency.

CNN International

The Economist (blog)
Tue, 08 Apr 2014 20:54:41 -0700

THE Heartbleed Bug sounds like a particularly nasty coronary complication. But it is in fact a software flaw that has left up to two-thirds of the world's websites vulnerable to attack by hackers. According to researchers who uncovered the bug in ...

Boston Globe

Boston Globe
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 15:18:45 -0700

... the first person to be arrested for using Heartbleed to steal sensitive personal data. Continue reading below. And on Friday, the computer security firm Mandiant reported that Heartbleed was used by an online criminal to hack one of its clients ...
 
Penn: Office of University Communications
Thu, 17 Apr 2014 07:03:45 -0700

With co-authors Jim Blythe of the University of Southern California and Sean W. Smith of Dartmouth College, Koppel studies what people actually do when working online without following computer security experts' rules. The researchers found that ...
 
Barre Montpelier Times Argus
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:15:25 -0700

I am sure that most people have heard about the recent release of an Internet virus called HeartBleed. This exposes a flaw that would allow an attacker to essentially reverse encryption that for many years people have paid big dollars to use to keep ...
 
The Economist (blog)
Fri, 28 Mar 2014 08:01:28 -0700

Riddled with unpatched security vulnerabilities ("zero-days") that let criminal hackers and intel agencies take control of the operating system, Windows is a computer security professional's nightmare. Measuring the severity of the problem is difficult ...
 
Times Colonist
Mon, 14 Apr 2014 12:41:15 -0700

OTTAWA - A computer security expert says he expects the fallout from the Heartbleed bug will go well beyond the 900 social insurance numbers that the Canada Revenue Agency says have been compromised. John Zabiuk says he thinks that could be just ...

Chron.com

Sacramento Bee
Sun, 13 Apr 2014 00:00:56 -0700

Computer security experts, some who've likened XP's situation to a “security sinkhole,” warn that individuals and businesses whose computers use Windows XP or the Web browser Internet Explorer 8 (or earlier versions) will be extremely vulnerable to ...
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