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The Ancient Rome Portal

Ancient Rome was a civilization which began as a small agricultural community on the Italian Peninsula in the 8th century BC. Rome became a large empire which straddled the Mediterranean Sea. In its twelve centuries of existence, Roman civilization was firstly a monarchy, then a republic that combined oligarchy and democracy, and finally became an autocratic empire. Through conquest and assimilation, it came to dominate Western Europe, the entire Mediterranean Basin including the Near East and North Africa, the Balkans, and the Black Sea.

The Roman empire went into decline in the 3rd century AD, and began to collapse in the 5th century AD. Plagued by internal instability and attacked by various migrating peoples, the western part of the empire, including Hispania, Gaul, and Italy, broke into independent kingdoms in the 5th century. The eastern part of the empire, governed from Constantinople, survived this crisis, and remained intact for another millennium, until its last remains were finally annexed by the emerging Ottoman Empire. This eastern, medieval stage of the Empire is usually referred to as the Byzantine Empire by historians.

Roman civilization was part of the period of classical antiquity, alongside ancient Greece—a civilization that inspired much of the culture of ancient Rome. Ancient Rome made significant contributions to the development of law, war, art, literature, architecture, technology, and language in the Western world, and its history continues to have a great influence on the world today.

Bust of Gaius Julius Caesar.
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In the Roman Republic, Tribune, Tribune of the Plebs, or Tribune of the People was a title shared by elected officials. Tribunes could convene the Plebeian Council and act as its president—in which capacity they had the right to propose legislation before it. The magistracy was sacrosanct, so any assault on their person was prohibited. Tribunes could veto actions taken by magistrates, and intervene legally on behalf of plebeians. The tribune could also summon the Senate and make proposals before it. The tribune's power, however, was only in effect while he was within Rome; his ability to veto did not affect regional governors. Patricians were legally prohibited from holding the office of Tribune. Tribunes were elected by the Plebeian Council, which was composed of non-aristocrats that owned land, rather than by the general citizenship of Rome. Each tribune was given two plebeian aediles to assist them.

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The Villa of the Mysteries (Italian: Villa dei Misteri) is a well preserved ruin of a Roman Villa which lies some 400 metres northwest of Pompeii, southern Italy. In this fresco from the villa, a Bacchian rite is depicted.

The Villa of the Mysteries (Italian: Villa dei Misteri) is a well preserved ruin of a Roman Villa which lies some 400 metres northwest of Pompeii, southern Italy. In this fresco from the villa, a Bacchian rite is depicted.

Photo credit: The Yorck Project

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Sejanus Tiberius As.jpg
Lucius Aelius Seianus(or Sejanus) (20 BCOctober 18, 31 AD) was an ambitious soldier, friend and confidant of the Roman Emperor Tiberius. He served as Prefect of the Praetorian Guard from 14 AD until his death in 31. For a time he was the most influential and feared citizen of Rome and nearly succeeded in deposing Tiberius as Emperor. In 31, his intrigues were uncovered and Sejanus was executed along with his followers.

Sejanus was born at Volsinii, in Etruria, to the family of Cosconia Lentuli Maluginensis and Lucius Seius Strabo, an equestrian who became Praetorian Prefect under Augustus. By Roman custom he was known as Aelius Sejanus after his adoption into the more prestigious Aelian gens.

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  • ...That When Caesar's troops hesitated to leave their ships for fear of the Britons, the aquilifer of the tenth legion threw himself overboard and, carrying the eagle, advanced alone against the enemy?
  • ...That the most well paid athlete in human history, Gaius Appuleius Diocles, was an illiterate Roman Chariot racer, and earned the equivalent of $15 Billion US Dollars.

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Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Ancient_Rome — Please support Wikipedia.
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23785 news items

Journal Record (subscription)

Journal Record (subscription)
Tue, 01 Sep 2015 16:19:22 -0700

“Immortales: The Hall of Emperors of the Capitoline Museums, Rome,” is the impressive title of the fabulous exhibition opening Friday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. For the first time, this collection of 20 ...

Huffington Post

The News International
Mon, 31 Aug 2015 18:52:30 -0700

There is much the ancient world can teach us. One of the key lessons is that mass migration – motivated by war, societal collapse, and/or extreme poverty – is capable of destroying even the most powerful of empires. At its height the Roman Empire was ...

The Guardian

The Guardian
Wed, 26 Aug 2015 09:33:15 -0700

The best thing you never heard of is called colatura di alici, or garum, its ancient name. Garum and other similar fish-based sauces were the ketchup of the ancient world, mass produced in factories by the Romans, and sprinkled on anything savory.
 
CounterPunch
Fri, 28 Aug 2015 02:00:00 -0700

There is much the ancient world can teach us. One of the key lessons is that mass migration – motivated by war, societal collapse, and/or extreme poverty – is capable of destroying even the most powerful of empires. At its height the Roman Empire was ...

Brisbane Times

Brisbane Times
Sun, 16 Aug 2015 21:41:46 -0700

Bounty blends recent Queensland political history with Ancient Rome to create an absurd take on radicalisation, vice and moral panic in modern Australia, according to playwright Eric Gardiner. "It starts from something vaguely resembling reality then ...

Telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph.co.uk
Thu, 06 Aug 2015 04:26:15 -0700

So, you've been to Rouen cathedral, the one painted into submission by Monet. You've visited the Beaux Arts gallery full of Impressionists, toured the half-timbered old centre, and tackled the brand new, and belting, Historial devoted to Joan of Arc ...

CTV News

CTV News
Sun, 09 Aug 2015 05:26:09 -0700

ROME, Italy - Grabbing something hot and tasty on the move? You have the ancient Romans to thank. "Street food" was their invention, generally enjoyed with wine, gambling or even prostitutes. Food on the go was an integral part of daily life in the ...

Georgetown University Official Athletic Site

Georgetown University Official Athletic Site
Sat, 15 Aug 2015 15:18:45 -0700

Following a quick lunch, it was off to The Colosseum to begin our tour of Ancient Rome. The Colosseum was absolutely amazing and everyone agreed it was one of the highlights of the trip thus far. What made it even better was our tour guide, Mia, who ...
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