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For other uses, see Polycarp (disambiguation).
Saint Polycarp
Burghers michael saintpolycarp.jpg
S. Polycarpus, engraving by Michael Burghers, ca 1685
Martyr, Church Father and Bishop of Smyrna
Born AD 69
Died mid-late 150's or 160's
Smyrna
Honored in
Roman Catholic Church,[1]
Eastern Orthodox Church,
Oriental Orthodox Church,
Anglican Communion,
Lutheran Church
Feast February 23 (formerly January 26)
Attributes wearing the pallium, holding a book representing his Letter to the Philippians
Patronage against earache, dysentery
Major work(s) Polycarp's letter to the Philippians

Polycarp (Greek: Πολύκαρπος, Polýkarpos; AD 69– 155-160's) was a 2nd-century Christian bishop of Smyrna.[2] According to the Martyrdom of Polycarp he died a martyr, bound and burned at the stake, then stabbed when the fire failed to touch him.[3] Polycarp is regarded as a saint in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches.

It is recorded by Irenaeus, who heard him speak in his youth, and by Tertullian,[4] that he had been a disciple of John the Apostle.[5][6] Saint Jerome wrote that Polycarp was a disciple of John and that John had ordained him bishop of Smyrna.

The early tradition that expanded upon the Martyrdom to link Polycarp in competition and contrast with John the Apostle who, though many people had tried to kill him, was not martyred but died of old age after being exiled to the island of Patmos, is embodied in the Coptic language fragmentary papyri (the "Harris fragments") dating to the 3rd to 6th centuries.[7] Frederick Weidmann, their editor, interprets the "Harris fragments" as Smyrnan hagiography addressing Smyrna-Ephesus church rivalries, which "develops the association of Polycarp and John to a degree unwitnessed, so far as we know, either before or since".[8] The fragments echo the Martyrology, and diverge from it.

With Clement of Rome and Ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp is regarded as one of three chief Apostolic Fathers. The sole surviving work attributed to his authorship is his Letter to the Philippians; it is first recorded by Irenaeus of Lyons.

Surviving writings and early accounts[edit]

The sole surviving work attributed to him is Polycarp's letter to the Philippians, a mosaic of references to the Greek Scriptures, preserved in Irenaeus' account of Polycarp's life. It, and an account of The Martyrdom of Polycarp that takes the form of a circular letter from the church of Smyrna to the churches of Pontus, form part of the collection of writings Roman Catholics term "The Apostolic Fathers" to emphasize their particular closeness to the apostles in Church traditions. Outside of the Book of Acts which contains the death of Saint Stephen, the Martyrdom is considered one of the earliest genuine[2] accounts of a Christian martyrdom, and is one of the very few genuine accounts from the actual age of the persecutions.

Life[edit]

There are two chief sources of information concerning the life of Polycarp: the letter of the Smyrnaeans recounting the martyrdom of Polycarp and the passages in Irenaeus' Adversus Haereses. Other sources are the epistles of Ignatius, which include one to Polycarp and another to the Smyrnaeans, and Polycarp's own letter to the Philippians. In 1999, some third to 6th century Coptic fragments about Polycarp were also published.[9]

Papias[edit]

According to Irenaeus, Polycarp was a companion of Papias,[10] another "hearer of John" as Irenaeus interprets Papias' testimony, and a correspondent of Ignatius of Antioch. Ignatius addressed a letter to him, and mentions him in his letters to the Ephesians and to the Magnesians.

Irenaeus regarded the memory of Polycarp as a link to the apostolic past. He relates how and when he became a Christian, and in his letter to Florinus stated that he saw and heard Polycarp personally in lower Asia. In particular, he heard the account of Polycarp's discussion with John and with others who had seen Jesus. Irenaeus also reports that Polycarp was converted to Christianity by apostles, was consecrated a bishop, and communicated with many who had seen Jesus. He repeatedly emphasizes the very great age of Polycarp.

Visit to Anicetus[edit]

According to Irenaeus, during the time his fellow Syrian, Anicetus, was the Pope, or Bishop of Rome, in the 150s or 160, Polycarp visited Rome to discuss the differences that existed between Asia and Rome "with regard to certain things" and especially about the time of the Easter festivals. Irenaeus said that on certain things the two bishops speedily came to an understanding, while as to the time of Easter, each adhered to his own custom, without breaking off communion with the other. Pope Anicetus—the Roman sources offering it as a mark of special honor—allowed Polycarp to celebrate the Eucharist in his own church.[11] They might have found their customs for observing the Christian Passover differed, Polycarp following the eastern practice of celebrating the feast on the 14th of Nisan, the day of the Jewish Passover, regardless of what day of the week it fell.

Date of martyrdom[edit]

Polycarp miraculously extinguishing the fire burning the city of Smyrna

In the Martyrdom, Polycarp is recorded as saying on the day of his death, "Eighty and six years I have served Him, and He has done me no wrong", which could indicate that he was then eighty-six years old[12] or that he may have lived eighty-six years after his conversion.[3] Polycarp goes on to say, "How then can I blaspheme my King and Saviour? Bring forth what thou wilt." Polycarp was burned at the stake for refusing to burn incense to the Roman Emperor.[13] The date of Polycarp's death is in dispute. Eusebius dates it to the reign of Marcus Aurelius, c. 166–167. However, a post-Eusebian addition to the Martyrdom of Polycarp dates his death to Saturday, February 23, in the proconsulship of Statius Quadratus—which works out to be 155 or 156. These earlier dates better fit the tradition of his association with Ignatius and John the Evangelist. However, the addition to the Martyrdom cannot be considered reliable on only its own merits. Lightfoot would argue for the earlier date of Polycarp's death, with which Killen would strongly disagree. In addition, some have proposed a date in 177. However the earlier date of 156 is generally accepted.[14]

Great Sabbath[edit]

Because the Smyrnaean letter known as the Martyrdom of Polycarp states that Polycarp was taken on the day of the Sabbath and killed on the Great Sabbath, some believe that this is evidence that the Smyrnaeans under Polycarp observed the seventh day Sabbath.

William Cave wrote "... the Sabbath or 'Saturday' (for so the word sabbatum is constantly used in the writings of the fathers, when speaking of it as it relates to Christians) was held by them in great veneration, and especially in the Eastern parts honoured with all the public solemnities of religion. This is plain, not only from some passages in Ignatius and Clemens's Constitutions, but from writers of more unquestionable credit and authority. Athanasius, bishop of Alexandria, tells us that they assembled on Saturdays... to worship Jesus Christ, the Lord of the Sabbath."[15]

Some feel that the expression the Great Sabbath refers to the Christian Passover or another annual holy day. If so, then Polycarp's martyrdom would have had to occur at least a month after the traditional February 23 dating since according to the Hebrew calendar the earliest time Nisan 14, the date of the Passover, can fall on in any given year is late March. Other "Great Sabbaths" (if this is referring to what are commonly considered to be Jewish holy days, though observed by many early professors of Christ) come in the spring, late summer, and the fall. None occur in winter.

It is claimed that the "Great Sabbath" is alluded to in John 7:37. Here it is referred to as "the last day, that great day of the feast" and is a separate annual holy day immediately following the Feast of Tabernacles. Others argue that the gospel writer is referring to the seventh day of the Feast and later refers to the Eighth Day or annual Sabbath in John 9:14. It is more likely that the "Great Sabbath," as referred to in the Martyrdom of Polycarp is alluded to in John 19:31 which points out "that [weekly] Sabbath day" following the "[day of the] preparation" was a "high day" or "great." In any event, however, it is disputable whether such biblical references imply a common practice or just onetime events.

Importance[edit]

Polycarp occupies an important place in the history of the early Christian Church.[9] He is among the earliest Christians whose writings survive. Saint Jerome wrote that Polycarp was a "disciple of the apostle John and by him ordained bishop of Smyrna".[16] He was an elder of an important congregation which was a large contributor to the founding of the Christian Church. He is from an era whose orthodoxy is widely accepted by Eastern Orthodox Churches, Oriental Orthodox Churches, Church of God groups, Sabbatarian groups, mainstream Protestants and Catholics alike. According to David Trobisch, Polycarp may have been the one who compiled, edited, and published the New Testament.[17] All of this makes his writings of great interest.

Irenaeus, who had heard him preach in his youth, said of him:[18] "a man who was of much greater weight, and a more steadfast witness of truth, than Valentinus, and Marcion, and the rest of the heretics". Polycarp lived in an age after the deaths of the apostles, when a variety of interpretations of the sayings of Jesus were being preached. His role was to authenticate orthodox teachings through his reputed connection with the apostle John: "a high value was attached to the witness Polycarp could give as to the genuine tradition of old apostolic doctrine", Wace commented,[3] "his testimony condemning as offensive novelties the figments of the heretical teachers". Irenaeus states (iii. 3) that on Polycarp's visit to Rome, his testimony converted many disciples of Marcion and Valentinus.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eastern Catholic "Uniate" Churches included.
  2. ^ a b Saint Polycarp at Encyclopædia Britannica
  3. ^ a b c Henry Wace, Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature to the End of the Sixth Century A.D., with an Account of the Principal Sects and Heresies, s.v. "Polycarpus, bishop of Smyrna".
  4. ^ Tertullian, De praescriptione hereticorum 32.2
  5. ^ Polycarp, The Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913.
  6. ^ Irenaeus, Adversus Haereses III.3, Polycarp does not quote from the Gospel of John in his surviving letter, which may be an indication that whichever John he knew was not the author of that gospel, or that the gospel was not finished during Polycarp's discipleship with John. Weidmann suggests (Weidmann 1999:132) that the "Harris fragments" may reflect early traditions: "the raw material for a narrative about John and Polycarp may have been in place before Irenaeus; the codification of the significance of a direct line of succession from the apostle John through Polycarp may arguably be linked directly to Irenaeus".
  7. ^ Dating according to Frederick W. Weidmann, ed. and tr. Polycarp and John: The Harris Fragments and Their Challenge to the Literary Tradition (University of Notre Dame Press, 1999).
  8. ^ Weidmann 1999:133.
  9. ^ a b Hartog, Paul (2002). Polycarp and the New Testament. p. 17. ISBN 978-3-16-147419-4. 
  10. ^ Irenaeus, V.xxxiii.
  11. ^ Public Domain Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Polycarp". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 
  12. ^ Staniforth, Maxwell, trans. Early Christian Writings London: Penguin Books (1987): 115.
  13. ^ Polycarp.net
  14. ^ Ferguson, Everett (16 June 2005), "4: The Church and the Empire", Church History: From Christ to pre-Reformation, Grand Rapids: Zondervan, p. 80, ISBN 978-0-310-20580-7 
  15. ^ Cave, Primitive Christianity: or the Religion of the Ancient Christians in the First Ages of the Gospel. 1840, revised edition by H. Cary. Oxford, London, pp. 84–85).
  16. ^ Philip Schaff (ed.), Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, 2 3 
  17. ^ David Trobisch, "Who Published the New Testament?", Free Inquiry, 28:1 (2007/2008) pp.30–33. See http://www.trobisch.com/david/CV/Publications/20071226%20FreeInquiry%20Who%20Published%20Christian%20Bible%20BW.pdf
  18. ^ Irenaeus, Adversus Haereses III.3.4

External links[edit]


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84 news items

 
The News Journal
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:29:35 -0700

Thomas Flowers, pastor at St. Polycarp Catholic Church in Smyrna. "Sin is death. That's what we teach theologically," Flowers said. "Dishonesty is death. Disappointment in someone you look up to is death. Feeling someone covered up wrong – that's a ...
 
Nyasa Times
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:30:00 -0700

The Bishops also elected Polycarp Cardinal Pengo of Tanzania, John Cardinal Njue of Kenya, Ziyaye and Bishop Anthony Muheria of Kenya as trustees for AMECEA. The following have been elected as AMECEA executive board members: Bishop ...
 
The Star
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:59:18 -0700

CEMENT maker Athi River Mining's chief executive Pradeep Paunrana is the new chairman of Kenya Association of Manufacturers replacing Polycarp Igathe who has been at the helm for two years. Melvins International boss Flora Mutahi has been picked as ...
 
Solomon Star
Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:26:15 -0700

People who have registered more than once are likely to face heavy penalty depending on the investigation by the Solomon Islands Electoral Commission (SIEC). In the recent voters' registration, more than 6,000 voters were found to have registered more ...

Kenya Broadcasting Corporation

Kenya Broadcasting Corporation
Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:20:33 -0700

The Board of Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) has elected Mr. Pradeep Paunrana as Chairman of KAM a spokesperson of the Association has said. Mrs Flora Mutahi, takes over as Vice Chairlady. Mr. Paunrana takes the rein from Mr. Polycarp ...
 
The Swazi Observer
Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:56:15 -0700

image MHLEKAZI: Her Majesty the Indlovukazi at Magadzavane Lodge on Tuesday where she visited to celebrate King Sobhuza II's birthday. Her Majesty was joined by Umdlunkulu Zola Mafu, wife to King Gooddwill Zwelithini and members of the Royal ...
 
The Standard Digital News
Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:06:09 -0700

“The extent of the crisis is of grave concern to consumer safety given that statistics indicate that almost 80 per cent of the LPG Business Segment is illegal,” said Polycarp Igathe, chairman, PIEA. In a statement yesterday, Mr Igathe said the ...
 
Ghafla!Kenya
Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:39:17 -0700

The song flaunts Sauti Sol's diversity and wide array of musical inspiration while still upholding their harmonious mix of voices. Packaged in rich instrumentals and Polycarp's rhythmic lead guitar, Sura Yako is written and produced by Sauti Sol under ...
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