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Philip Emeagwali

Philip Emeagwali (born in 1954) is a Nigerian-born engineer, mathematician and computer scientist/geologist who was one of two winners of the 1989 Gordon Bell Prize, a prize from the IEEE, for his use of a Connection Machine supercomputer to help analyze petroleum fields.

Biography[edit]

Emeagwali was born in Akure, Nigeria on 23 August 1954.[1] His early schooling was suspended in 1967 as a result of the Nigerian Civil War. At 14 years, he served in the Biafran army. After the war he completed high-school equivalency through self-study. He travelled to the United States to study under a scholarship following completion of a correspondence course at the University of London.[citation needed] He received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Oregon State University in 1977. During this time, he worked as a civil engineer at the Bureau of Land Reclamation in Wyoming. He later moved to Washington DC, receiving in 1986 a master's degree from George Washington University in ocean and marine engineering, and a second master's in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland.[2]

He is married to Dale Brown Emeagwali, a noted African-American microbiologist.[3]

Award[edit]

Emeagwali received a $1,000[4] 1989 Gordon Bell Prize, based on an application of the CM-2 massively-parallel computer for computational fluid dynamics (oil-reservoir modeling). He won in the "price/performance" category, with a performance figure of 400 Mflops/$1M, corresponding to an absolute performance of 3.1 Gflops. The other recipient of the award, who won in the "peak performance" category for a similar application of the CM-2 to oil-related seismic data processing, actually had a price-performance figure of 500 Mflops/$1M (superior to what Emeagwali had achieved) and an absolute performance of 6.0 Gflops, but the judges decided not to award both prizes to the same team.[5][6] Emeagwali's simulation was the first program to apply a pseudo-time approach to reservoir modeling.[7]

Emeagwali was voted the "35th-greatest African (and greatest African scientist) of all time" in a survey by New African magazine.[8] His achievements were quoted in a speech by Bill Clinton as an example of what Nigerians could achieve when given the opportunity.[9] He is also a frequent feature of Black History Month articles in the popular press.[10][11]

Court case and the denial of degree[edit]

Emeagwali studied for a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan from 1987 through 1991. His thesis was not accepted by a committee of internal and external examiners and thus he was not awarded the degree. Emeagwali filed a court challenge, stating that the decision was a violation of his civil rights and that the university had discriminated against him in several ways because of his race. The court challenge was dismissed, as was an appeal to the Michigan state Court of Appeals.[12]

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Emeagwali — Please support Wikipedia.
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2 news items

 
Vanguard
Thu, 21 Aug 2014 00:27:34 -0700

... BIOMASS Partners (Worldwide), and American Economist and Best selling Author Jim Roger, Ahmed Shaaban of the Khaleej Times in the UAE, Esam Wshah, CEO, SLC Petroleum Canada, Dr. Philip Emeagwali, and Prof. Steven Hawking among others.

spyghana.com

spyghana.com
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 01:03:45 -0700

... the innovations in oil exploration technology many Ghanaians especially the mis-educated political leadership would be surprised to know that the technology in oil exploration was created by an Afrikan named Philip Emeagwali NOT a White/European.
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