digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

Peter F. Drucker
Drucker-portrait-bkt 1014.jpg
Born (1909-11-19)19 November 1909
Kaasgraben, Vienna, Austria-Hungary
Died 11 November 2005(2005-11-11) (aged 95)
Claremont, California
Alma mater University of Frankfurt
Occupation Management consultant, educator and author
Awards Presidential Medal of Freedom (2002)

Peter Ferdinand Drucker (/ˈdrʌkər/; German: [ˈdʀʊkɐ]; November 19, 1909 – November 11, 2005) was an Austrian-born American management consultant, educator, and author, whose writings contributed to the philosophical and practical foundations of the modern business corporation. He was also a leader in the development of management education, and he invented the concept known as management by objectives.[1]

Introduction[edit]

Drucker's books and scholarly and popular articles explored how humans are organized across the business, government, and nonprofit sectors of society.[2] He is one of the best-known and most widely influential thinkers and writers on the subject of management theory and practice. His writings have predicted many of the major developments of the late twentieth century, including privatization and decentralization; the rise of Japan to economic world power; the decisive importance of marketing; and the emergence of the information society with its necessity of lifelong learning.[3] In 1959, Drucker coined the term “knowledge worker" and later in his life considered knowledge worker productivity to be the next frontier of management.[4] Peter Drucker gave his name to three institutions: the Drucker Institute and the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management, both at Claremont Graduate University, and the Peter F. Drucker Academy.[5] The annual Global Peter Drucker Forum in his hometown of Vienna, honors his legacy.

Biography[edit]

Peter Drucker was of Jewish descent on both sides of his family,[6][not in citation given] but his parents converted to Christianity and lived in what he referred to as a "liberal" Lutheran Protestant household in Austria-Hungary.[7] His mother Caroline Bondi had studied medicine and his father Adolf Drucker was a lawyer and high-level civil servant.[8] Drucker was born in Vienna, Austria, in a small village named Kaasgraben (now part of the 19th district of Vienna-Döbling).[9] He grew up in a home where intellectuals, high government officials, and scientists would meet to discuss new ideas.[10]

After graduating from Döbling Gymnasium, Drucker found few opportunities for employment in post-World War Vienna, so he moved to Hamburg, Germany, first working as an apprentice at an established cotton trading company, then as a journalist, writing for Der Österreichische Volkswirt (The Austrian Economist).[8] Drucker then moved to Frankfurt, where he took a job at the Daily Frankfurter General-Anzeiger.[11] While in Frankfurt, he also earned a doctorate in international law and public law from the University of Frankfurt in 1931.[12]

In 1933, Drucker left Germany for England.[13] In London, he worked for an insurance company, then as the chief economist at a private bank.[14] He also reconnected with Doris Schmitz, an acquaintance from the University of Frankfurt, and they married in 1934.[15] The couple permanently relocated to the United States, where he became a university professor as well as a freelance writer and business consultant.

In 1943, Drucker became a naturalized citizen of the United States. He then had a distinguished career as a teacher, first as a professor of politics and philosophy at Bennington College from 1942 to 1949, then twenty-two years at New York University as a Professor of Management from 1950 to 1971.

Drucker went to California in 1971, where he developed one of the country's first executive MBA programs for working professionals at Claremont Graduate University (then known as Claremont Graduate School). From 1971 until his death, he was the Clarke Professor of Social Science and Management at Claremont.[16] Claremont Graduate University's management school was named the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management in his honor in 1987 (later renamed the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management). He established the Drucker Archives at Claremont Graduate University in 1999; the Archives became the Drucker Institute in 2006. Drucker taught his last class in 2002 at age 92. He continued to act as a consultant to businesses and non-profit organizations well into his nineties.

Drucker died November 11, 2005 in Claremont, California of natural causes at 95.[17] He had four children and is the grandfather of Nova Spivack, one of six grandchildren.[18][19]

Work and philosophy[edit]

Early influences[edit]

Among Peter Drucker's early influences was the Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter, a friend of his father’s, who impressed upon Drucker the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship.[20] Drucker was also influenced, in a much different way, by John Maynard Keynes, whom he heard lecture in 1934 in Cambridge.[21] “I suddenly realized that Keynes and all the brilliant economic students in the room were interested in the behavior of commodities,” Drucker wrote, “while I was interested in the behavior of people.”[22]

Over the next 70 years, Drucker’s writings would be marked by a focus on relationships among human beings, as opposed to the crunching of numbers. His books were filled with lessons on how organizations can bring out the best in people, and how workers can find a sense of community and dignity in a modern society organized around large institutions.[2] As a business consultant, Drucker disliked the term “guru,” though it was often applied to him; “I have been saying for many years,” Drucker once remarked, “that we are using the word ‘guru’ only because ‘charlatan’ is too long to fit into a headline.”[23]

As a young writer, Drucker wrote two pieces — one on the conservative German philosopher Friedrich Julius Stahl and another called “The Jewish Question in Germany” — that were burned and banned by the Nazis.[3]

The 'business thinker'[edit]

Drucker's career as a business thinker took off in 1942, when his initial writings on politics and society won him access to the internal workings of General Motors (GM), one of the largest companies in the world at that time. His experiences in Europe had left him fascinated with the problem of authority. He shared his fascination with Donaldson Brown, the mastermind behind the administrative controls at GM. In 1943 Brown invited him in to conduct what might be called a "political audit": a two-year social-scientific analysis of the corporation. Drucker attended every board meeting, interviewed employees, and analyzed production and decision-making processes.

The resulting book, Concept of the Corporation, popularized GM's multidivisional structure and led to numerous articles, consulting engagements, and additional books. GM, however, was hardly thrilled with the final product. Drucker had suggested that the auto giant might want to re-examine a host of long-standing policies on customer relations, dealer relations, employee relations and more. Inside the corporation, Drucker’s counsel was viewed as hypercritical. GM's revered chairman, Alfred Sloan, was so upset about the book that he “simply treated it as if it did not exist,” Drucker later recalled, “never mentioning it and never allowing it to be mentioned in his presence.”[24]

Drucker taught that management is “a liberal art,” and he infused his management advice with interdisciplinary lessons from history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, culture and religion.[2] He also believed strongly that all institutions, including those in the private sector, have a responsibility to the whole of society. “The fact is,” Drucker wrote in his 1973 Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices, “that in modern society there is no other leadership group but managers. If the managers of our major institutions, and especially of business, do not take responsibility for the common good, no one else can or will.”[25]

Drucker was interested in the growing effect of people who worked with their minds rather than their hands. He was intrigued by employees who knew more about certain subjects than their bosses or colleagues and yet had to cooperate with others in a large organization. Rather than simply glorify the phenomenon as the epitome of human progress, Drucker analyzed it and explained how it challenged the common thinking about how organizations should be run.

His approach worked well in the increasingly mature business world of the second half of the twentieth century. By that time, large corporations had developed the basic manufacturing efficiencies and managerial hierarchies of mass production. Executives thought they knew how to run companies, and Drucker took it upon himself to poke holes in their beliefs, lest organizations become stale. But he did so in a sympathetic way. He assumed that his readers were intelligent, rational, hardworking people of good will. If their organizations struggled, he believed it was usually because of outdated ideas, a narrow conception of problems, or internal misunderstandings.

Drucker developed an extensive consulting business built around his personal relationship with top management. He became legendary among many of post-war Japan’s new business leaders trying to rebuild their war-torn homeland. He advised the heads of General Motors, Sears, General Electric, W.R. Grace and IBM, among many others. Over time he offered his management advice to non-profits like the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army. His advice was eagerly sought by the senior executives of the Adela Investment Company, a private initiative of the world’s multinational corporations to promote investment in the developing countries of Latin America.[26]

Drucker's writings[edit]

Drucker's 39 books have been translated into more than thirty-six languages. Two are novels, one an autobiography. He is the co-author of a book on Japanese painting, and made eight series of educational films on management topics. He also penned a regular column in the Wall Street Journal for 10 years and contributed frequently to the Harvard Business Review, The Atlantic Monthly, and The Economist.

His work is especially popular in Japan, even more so after the publication of "What If the Female Manager of a High-School Baseball Team Read Drucker’s Management", a novel that features the main character using one of his books to great effect, which was also adapted into an anime and a live action film.[27] His popularity in Japan may be compared with that of his contemporary W. Edwards Deming.[28]

Peter Drucker also wrote a book in 2001 called The Essential Drucker. It is the first volume and combination of the past sixteen years of Peter Drucker's work on management. The information gathered is a collection from his previous findings, The Practice of Management (1954) to Management Challenges for the 21st Century (1999), this book offers, in Drucker's words, "a coherent and fairly comprehensive introduction to management". He also answers frequently asked questions from up and coming entrepreneurs who tend to ponder the questionable outcomes of management.[16]

Key ideas[edit]

Several ideas run through most of Drucker's writings:

  • Decentralization and simplification.[29] Drucker discounted the command and control model and asserted that companies work best when they are decentralized. According to Drucker, corporations tend to produce too many products, hire employees they don't need (when a better solution would be outsourcing), and expand into economic sectors that they should avoid.
  • The concept of "Knowledge Worker" in his 1959 book "The Landmarks of Tomorrow".[30] Since then, knowledge-based work has become increasingly important in businesses worldwide.
  • The prediction of the death of the "Blue Collar" worker.[31] A blue collar worker is typically a high school dropout paid middle class wages with all benefits for assembling cars in Detroit. The changing face of the US Auto Industry is a testimony to this prediction.
  • The concept of what eventually came to be known as "outsourcing."[32] He used the example of "front room" and "back room" of each business: A company should be engaged in only the front room activities that are critical to supporting its core business. Back room activities should be handed over to other companies, for whom these tasks are the front room activities.
  • The importance of the non-profit sector,[33] which he calls the third sector (private sector and the Government sector being the first two). Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) play crucial roles in the economies of countries around the world.
  • A profound skepticism of macroeconomic theory.[34] Drucker contended that economists of all schools fail to explain significant aspects of modern economies.
  • A lament that the sole focus of microeconomics is price, citing its lack of showing what products actually do for us,[35] thereby stimulating commercial interest in discovering how to calculate what products actually do for us; from their price.[36]
  • Respect for the worker. Drucker believed that employees are assets not liabilities. He taught that knowledgeable workers are the essential ingredients of the modern economy, and that a hybrid management model is the sole method of demonstrating an employee's value to the organization. Central to this philosophy is the view that people are an organization's most valuable resource, and that a manager's job is both to prepare people to perform and give them freedom to do so.[37]
  • A belief in what he called "the sickness of government." Drucker made nonpartisan claims that government is often unable or unwilling to provide new services that people need and/or want, though he believed that this condition is not intrinsic to the form of government. The chapter "The Sickness of Government"[38] in his book The Age of Discontinuity formed the basis of New Public Management,[39] a theory of public administration that dominated the discipline in the 1980s and 1990s.
  • The need for "planned abandonment." Businesses and governments have a natural human tendency to cling to "yesterday's successes" rather than seeing when they are no longer useful.[40]
  • A belief that taking action without thinking is the cause of every failure.
  • The need for community. Early in his career, Drucker predicted the "end of economic man" and advocated the creation of a "plant community"[41] where an individual's social needs could be met. He later acknowledged that the plant community never materialized, and by the 1980s, suggested that volunteering in the nonprofit sector was the key to fostering a healthy society where people found a sense of belonging and civic pride.[42]
  • The need to manage business by balancing a variety of needs and goals, rather than subordinating an institution to a single value.[43][44] This concept of management by objectives forms the keynote of his 1954 landmark The Practice of Management.[45]
  • A company's primary responsibility is to serve its customers. Profit is not the primary goal, but rather an essential condition for the company's continued existence and sustainability.[46]
  • A belief in the notion that great companies could stand among humankind's noblest inventions.[47]

Criticism of Drucker's work[edit]

C. L. R. James, Raya Dunayevskaya and Grace Lee Boggs criticised Drucker in their 1950 text State Capitalism and World Revolution: "the Christian Humanists (for example, Peter Drucker) will join with the labor bureaucracy to keep the mass of workers in their place at the base of the hierarchy in production."[48] The Wall Street Journal researched several of his lectures in 1987 and reported that he was sometimes loose with the facts. Drucker was off the mark, for example, when he told an audience that English was the official language for all employees at Japan’s Mitsui trading company. (Drucker’s defense: “I use anecdotes to make a point, not to write history.”) And while he was known for his prescience, he wasn’t always correct in his forecasts. He predicted, for instance, that the nation’s financial center would shift from New York to Washington.[49]

Others maintain that one of Drucker’s core concepts—“management by objectives”—is flawed and has never really been proven to work effectively. Critic Dale Krueger said that the system is difficult to implement, and that companies often wind up overemphasizing control, as opposed to fostering creativity, to meet their goals.[50]

Drucker's classic Concept of the Corporation criticized General Motors at a time when it was, in some ways, the most successful corporation in the world. Many of GM's executives considered Drucker persona non grata for a long time afterward. Alfred P. Sloan refrained from personal hostility toward Drucker, but even Sloan considered Drucker's critiques of GM's management to be "dead wrong".[51]

Awards and honors[edit]

This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the German Wikipedia.

Drucker was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by US President George W. Bush on July 9, 2002.[52] He also received honors from the governments of Austria,[53] including the Grand Silver Medal for Services to the Republic of Austria in 1974,[54] the Grand Gold Decoration for Services to the Republic of Austria in 1991[55] and the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art, 1st class in 1999[56] and Japan (Order of the Sacred Treasure, 3rd class; 24 June 1966[57]).

Drucker was the Honorary Chairman of the Peter F. Drucker Foundation for Nonprofit Management, now the Leader to Leader Institute, from 1990 through 2002.[58] In 1969 he was awarded New York University’s highest honor, its Presidential Citation.[59] For his article, "What Makes an Effective Executive", Harvard Business Review honored Drucker in the June 2004 with his seventh McKinsey Award — the most awarded to one person.[60] Drucker was inducted into the Junior Achievement US Business Hall of Fame in 1996.[61] He received 25 honorary doctorates from American, Belgian, Czech, English, Spanish and Swiss universities.[62] His 1954 book The Practice of Management was voted the third most influential management book of the 20th century in a poll of the Fellows of the Academy of Management.[63] In Claremont, California, Eleventh Street between College Avenue and Dartmouth Avenue was renamed "Drucker Way" in October 2009 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Drucker's birth.[64]

Books by Drucker[edit]

  • 1939: The End of Economic Man (New York: The John Day Company)
  • 1942: The Future of Industrial Man (New York: The John Day Company)
  • 1946: Concept of the Corporation (New York: The John Day Company)
  • 1950: The New Society (New York: Harper & Brothers)
  • 1954: The Practice of Management (New York: Harper & Brothers)
  • 1957: America's Next Twenty Years (New York: Harper & Brothers)
  • 1959: Landmarks of Tomorrow (New York: Harper & Brothers)
  • 1964: Managing for Results (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1967: The Effective Executive (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1969: The Age of Discontinuity (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1970: Technology, Management and Society (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1971: The New Markets and Other Essays (London: William Heinemann Ltd.)
  • 1971: Men, Ideas and Politics (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1971: Drucker on Management (London: Management Publications Limited)
  • 1973: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices' (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1976: The Unseen Revolution: How Pension Fund Socialism Came to America (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1977: People and Performance: The Best of Peter Drucker on Management (New York: Harper's College Press)
  • 1978: Adventures of a Bystander (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1980: Managing in Turbulent Times (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1981: Toward the Next Economics and Other Essays (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1982: The Changing World of Executive (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1982: The Last of All Possible Worlds (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1984: The Temptation to Do Good (London: William Heinemann Ltd.)
  • 1985: Innovation and Entrepreneurship (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1986: The Frontiers of Management: Where Tomorrow's Decisions are Being Shaped Today (New York: Truman Talley Books/E.D. Dutton)
  • 1989: The New Realities: in Government and Politics, in Economics and Business, in Society and World View (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1990: Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Practices and Principles (New York: Harper Collins)
  • 1992: Managing for the Future (New York: Harper Collins)
  • 1993: The Ecological Vision (New Brunswick, NJ and London: Transaction Publishers)
  • 1993: Post-Capitalist Society (New York: HarperCollins)
  • 1995: Managing in a Time of Great Change (New York: Truman Talley Books/Dutton)
  • 1997: Drucker on Asia: A Dialogue between Peter Drucker and Isao Nakauchi (Tokyo: Diamond Inc.)
  • 1998: Peter Drucker on the Profession of Management (Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing)
  • 1999: Management Challenges for 21st Century (New York: Harper Business)
  • 2001: The Essential Drucker (New York: Harper Business)
  • 2002: Managing in the Next Society (New York: Truman Talley Books/St. Martin’s Press)
  • 2002: A Functioning Society (New Brunswick, NJ and London: Transaction Publishers)
  • 2004: The Daily Drucker (New York: Harper Business)
  • 2008 (posthumous): The Five Most Important Questions (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass)

Other Drucker publications[edit]

Monographs[edit]

  • 1932: The Justification of International Law and the Will of the State (Doctoral dissertation)
  • 1933: Friedrich Julius Stahl, Conservative Political Theory & Historical Development (Tübingen: Mohr)
  • 1936: The Jewish Question in Germany (Wien: Gsur)

Contributing writer[edit]

  • 1961: Power and Democracy in America (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press Publishers)
  • 1969: Preparing Tomorrow’s Business Leaders Today (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall)
  • 1979: Song of the Brus: Japanese Painting from Sanso Collection (Seattle: Seattle Art Museum)
  • 1988: "Handbook of Management by Objectives" Bill Reddin and Denis Ryan (Published by Tata Mcgraw-Hill in New Delhi).
  • 1991: The Rise of NEC (Blackwell Business)

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • 1977: An Introductory View of Management (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 1977 (revised edition, 2009): Management Cases (New York: Harper & Row)
  • 2006: The Effective Executive In Action with Joseph A. Maciariello (New York: HarperCollins)
  • 2006: Classic Drucker (Boston: Harvard Business Review Press)
  • 2008 (posthumous): Management: Revised with sujog arya (New York: HarperCollins)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Drucker, Peter F. “Reflections of a Social Ecologist,” Society, May/June 1992.
  2. ^ a b c Why Drucker Now?, Drucker Institute.
  3. ^ a b Byrne, John A.; Gerdes, Lindsey (November 28, 2005). "The Man Who Invented Management". BusinessWeek. Retrieved November 2, 2009. 
  4. ^ Davenport, Thomas H. Thinking for a Living, 2005, p. 8.
  5. ^ Schumpeter (19 November 2009). "Remembering Drucker". The Economist. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  6. ^ Lee, Anne Feder. Thomas Olechowski, ed. The Kelsen Genealogy at University of Vienna
  7. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Ecological Vision: Reflections on the Human Condition, 1993, p. 425.
  8. ^ a b Drucker, Peter F. Adventures of a Bystander, 1979.
  9. ^ Peter F. Drucker: A Biography in Progress, p.1, at his website
  10. ^ Beatty, Jack. The World According to Peter Drucker, 1998, pp. 5-7.
  11. ^ Drucker, Peter F. Adventures of a Bystander, 1979, p. 159.
  12. ^ “Obituary: Peter Drucker, 95, Economist Who Prized Value of Workers,” The New York Times, 13 November 2005.
  13. ^ Drucker, Peter F.;Cohen, William. A Class with Drucker: The Lost Lessons of the World's Greatest Management Teacher, 2007, p. 242.
  14. ^ Peter F. Drucker: A Biography in Progress, p.6, at this website
  15. ^ Certified copy of Peter and Doris Drucker’s marriage certificate, The Drucker Institute Archives, Box 39, Folder 11, Claremont, California.
  16. ^ a b The Essential Drucker (2001)
  17. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (November 12, 2005). "Management Visionary Peter Drucker Dies". Washington Post. 
  18. ^ "Peter F. Drucker". Claremont Graduate University. Retrieved 24 March 2014. 
  19. ^ Pattison, Kermit (9 December 2008). "The Twine That Binds: Q&A With Nova Spivack". Fast Company. Retrieved 24 March 2014. 
  20. ^ Beatty, Jack. The World According to Peter Drucker, 1998, p. 163.
  21. ^ Drucker, Peter F. The Ecological Vision: Reflections on the Human Condition, 1993, p. 75.
  22. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Ecological Vision, 1993, pp. 75-76.
  23. ^ “Peter Drucker, the man who changed the world,” Business Review Weekly, 15 September 1997, p. 49.
  24. ^ Drucker, Peter F., Adventures of a Bystander, p. 288, (1979)
  25. ^ Drucker, Peter F., Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices, 1973, p. 325.
  26. ^ Wartzman, Rick. Forbes http://www.forbes.com/sites/drucker/2012/09/11/how-to-consult-like-peter-drucker/ |url= missing title (help). 
  27. ^ Drucker in the dug-out, A Japanese book about Peter Drucker and baseball is an unlikely hit, The Economist, Jul 1st 2010
  28. ^ Outcome-Based Religions: Purpose-Driven Apostasy, Mac Dominick, "The quest begins by looking into the lives of two men, Edwards Deming and Peter Drucker. Deming (now deceased) and Drucker (in his mid 90s) are enshrined as internationally renowned experts in business management and gurus of business methodology. These two individuals were among the primary players in a select group of Americans (Though Drucker is a U.S. citizen, he is actually Austrian.) who are lauded as part of the almost super-human effort that developed systems-based management philosophies that first gained public recognition in post-World War II Japan. The popular story is told of the Americans who developed a cutting edge business methodology that was rejected by western business but eagerly embraced by the Japanese.", quoted at Total Quality Management (TQM)
  29. ^ Buchanan, Leigh (19 November 2009). "Peter Drucker from A to Z". Inc. magazine. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  30. ^ Drucker, Peter (1957). Landmarks of Tomorrow. New York: Harper & Row. p. 122. ISBN 978-1-56000-622-0. 
  31. ^ Drucker, Peter (December 1995). "The Age of Social Transformation". The Atlantic. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  32. ^ Wartzman, Rick (5 February 2010). "Insourcing and Outsourcing: the Right Mix". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  33. ^ Drucker, Peter (July 1989). "What Business Can Learn from Nonprofits". Harvard Business Review. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  34. ^ Drucker, Peter (23 May 1983). "Schumpeter And Keynes". Forbes. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  35. ^ Drucker, P.F., "Innovation and Entrepreneurship", p250 (1985)
  36. ^ Farrell. C.J. ‘Commercial Knowledge on Innovation Economics’, A Report, (2014) pp. 1-11
  37. ^ Drucker, P. F., Collins, J., Kotler, P., Kouzes, J., Rodin, J., Rangan, V. K., et al., The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About your Organization, p. xix (2008)
  38. ^ Drucker, Peter (1969). The Age of Discontinuity. New York: Harper & Row. ISBN 978-1-56000-618-3. 
  39. ^ Pollitt and Bouckaert, Christopher and Geert (2011). Public Management Reform. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-19-959508-2. 
  40. ^ Drucker, Peter (1974). Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices. New York: HarperCollins. pp. 84–5. ISBN 978-0-7506-4389-4. 
  41. ^ Drucker, Peter (1942). The Future of Industrial Man. New York: The John Day Company. p. 205. ISBN 978-1-56000-623-7. 
  42. ^ Drucker, Peter (1990). Managing the Non-Profit Organization. New York: HarperCollins. pp. xii. ISBN 978-0-7506-2691-0. 
  43. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Practice of Management, pp 62-63, (1954)
  44. ^ Drucker, Peter F., Managing for the Future, p. 299, (1992)
  45. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Practice of Management, p. 12, (1954)
  46. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Practice of Management (1954)
  47. ^ Drucker, Peter F., The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Organization, p.54, (2008)
  48. ^ Johnson-Forrest Tendency (1950). State Capitalism and World Revolution. 
  49. ^ “Peter Drucker, Leading Management Guru, Dies at 95," Bloomberg, 11 November 2005.
  50. ^ Krueger, Dale. Strategic Management and Management by Objectives, Small Business Advancement National Center, 1994.
  51. ^ Drucker, Peter. Introduction, pp. v–vi, in Sloan, Alfred P. (1964), McDonald, John, ed., My Years with General Motors, Garden City, New York: Doubleday, LCCN 64-11306, OCLC 802024. ISBN 978-0385042352
  52. ^ Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony, 2002-07-09, The Drucker Institute Archives, Claremont, California.
  53. ^ Great Silver Award, Box 8, Folder 7, The Drucker Institute and Archives, Claremont, California.
  54. ^ "Reply to a parliamentary question" (pdf) (in German). p. 398. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  55. ^ "Reply to a parliamentary question" (pdf) (in German). p. 905. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  56. ^ "Reply to a parliamentary question" (pdf) (in German). p. 1305. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  57. ^ Japanese Decoration of Honor, Box 8, Folder 7, The Drucker Institute Archives, Claremont, California.
  58. ^ Drucker, Peter. Biographical data, Box 35, Folder 30, The Drucker Institute Archive, Claremont, California.
  59. ^ Letter recognizing Presidential Citation of New York University, Box 8, Folder 7, The Drucker Institute Archives, Claremont, California.
  60. ^ McKinsey Award Winners at Harvard Business Review
  61. ^ "Peter F. Drucker". U.S. Business Hall of Fame. Junior Archievement. Retrieved 17 December 2012. 
  62. ^ Honorary Degrees in The Drucker Institute Archives, Claremont, California.
  63. ^ Bedeian, Arthur G.; Wren, Daniel A. (Winter 2001). "Most Influential Management Books of the 20th Century". Organizational Dynamics 29 (3): 221–225. doi:10.1016/S0090-2616(01)00022-5. 
  64. ^ Wassenaar, Christina (8 October 2009). "Eleventh Street in Claremont, Calif., will be renamed "Drucker Way"". Drucker Institute. Retrieved 17 December 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Drucker — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
29541 videos foundNext > 

Peter Drucker: An Enduring Legacy

A recollection of the life and times, and the contributions of Peter F. Drucker, Father of Modern Management by those who knew him well: from colleagues, pro...

MBA in One Day - The Ideas of Peter Drucker About Management

MBA in One Day - Management Classics is a series of 10 audio programs from author Ben Tiggelaar about the insights and advice from the most important managem...

Peter Drucker Interview with Joseph Juran

Peter Drucker's Five Questions

When peter Drucker was introduced to a new business, he always began the conversation with five pentrating questions. You should ask yourself these questions...

Fundamentos de Peter Drucker

Authentic Leadership Peter Drucker

Quem foi Peter Drucker? - ADM Talks #1

Entrevistas, bate-papos descontraídos e muita troca de conhecimento. O ADM Talks é o canal da TV Administradores que traz conversas com especialistas, profes...

Peter Drucker y la Administración por Objetivos - Administración - Educatina

Más sobre este video en: http://bit.ly/17agxm1 ▷ Suscríbete: http://bit.ly/SubscribeEducatina ▷ ¡No olvides dar un "Like" y Comentarnos! - - - - - - - - - - ...

Management by Peter F. Drucker [2]

Title: Management Author: Peter F. Drucker Genre: Education The essential book on management from the man who invented the discipline. Now completely revised...

FRAGMENTO DE UMA ENTREVISTA COM PETER DRUCKER.avi

29541 videos foundNext > 

We're sorry, but there's no news about "Peter Drucker" right now.

Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Talk About Peter Drucker

You can talk about Peter Drucker with people all over the world in our discussions.

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!