digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

The Penn Relays (also Penn Relays Carnival) is the oldest and largest track and field competition in the United States, hosted annually since April 21, 1895 by the University of Pennsylvania at Franklin Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 2012, there were 116 events run at the meet and more athletes run in the Penn Relays then do any other track and field meet in the world.[1] It regularly attracts more than 15,000 participants from high schools, colleges, and track clubs throughout North America and abroad, notably Jamaica, competing in more than 300 events over five days. Historically, the event has been credited with popularizing the running of relay races. It is held during the last full week in April, ending on the last Saturday in April. Attendance typically tops 100,000 over the final three days, and has been known to surpass 50,000 on Saturday. The Penn Relays also holds a Catholic Youth Organization night for Catholic Middle Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Preliminaries are run on the Tuesday during Carnival Week, and the Finals are run on Friday.

History[edit]

Pre-history[edit]

When the University of Pennsylvania Track and Field committee wanted to add a little bit more excitement to their 1893 spring handicapped meet, they came up with the idea of running a relay race at the meet. The team would consist of four men all running a quarter of a mile one after the other. Today this relay race is known as the 4x400m relay. The sport of relay running was still fairly new at the time of the first Penn Relays, two years old to be exact. The Penn Relays impacted the history of the sport of relay racing and helped it become as popular as it is today. So during the 1893 spring handicapped track meet the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University men ran a relay race against each other. The Princeton men won with a time of 3:34 beating the University of Pennsylvania men by 8 yards.[1]

A tarnished, metal, double-handled cup. An inscription, in script, reads: "Univ of Penna/Relay Races/1895/Harvard vs. Pennsylvania."
1895 Penn Relay Trophy

The first Penn Relay Carnival[edit]

The first ever Penn Relays Carnival was held on April 21, 1895 at Franklin Field and was a huge success. Approximately 5,000 people attended the meet. Nine relay races were run and only two teams were in each race. Four of which were high school and prep school races. Another four were college races and one championship college race. The only relay run at that time was the 4x440yard relay or the mile relay. The first team to win a Penn Relays championship was Harvard University after they defeated University of Pennsylvania with a time of 3:34. Other colleges that competed in the meet were Cornell University, Columbia University, Lafayette, Lehigh, Rutgers, Swarthmore, College of the City of New York and New York University.[1]

Growth of the meet[edit]

The number of entries from the first Penn Relay Carnival to the second Penn Relay Carnival quadrupled. Because of this, a time schedule of events had to be made to keep the meet organized. A rule was established that if a team was not on time to their race, the race would be run without them. In that same year a 5-mile relay was added to the meet which would later become the 4-mile relay. The next year, in 1897, the 2-mile relay or the 4x800m relay was added to the meet. In 1898, The University of Chicago became the first midwestern team to attend the carnival. In the two years after that, the following events were added to the meet: 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash, 120 yard hurdles, the high jump, pole vault, long jump, shot put and hammer throw.

The Term "Carnival" was put into the name of the meet in 1910 because of the carnival like atmosphere created by the carnival like tent camp at the meet.[1] Also in 1910, the Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of America created The Relay Racing Code. The Code created a 20-foot area in front of the starting line in which a touch off between legs or runners of the relay could be made.This rule would later become the rule for the exchange zone or the 20-meter zone (10-meters in front of the finish line, 10-meters behind the finish line) in which a baton can be passed from one leg of a relay to another. At that time there was no such thing as batons or exchange zones that are used in present day relay racing, instead runners would stand on the starting line and wait for the runner before them to touch their hand. At the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, exchange zones were used for the first time. In 1913 at the Penn Relay Carnival, the baton was used for the first time. Zones and batons made exchanges from one leg of the relay to the next much more efficient and would eventually make relay times much faster.[1]

At the 1911 Penn Relay Carnival, the college and high school championship events became known as the "Championship of America" races. Ten years later the NCAA hosted the first college championship meet, but before then the Penn Relays was thought to be the national championship meet. In 1914, Oxford University turned the Penn Relay Carnival into an international event becoming the first team outside of the United States to compete. That year Oxford won the 4-mile relay. The 1915 Penn Relay Carnival took place over two days instead of just one like it had in the years before. That same year the sprint medley relay (200m, 200m, 400m, 800m) and the distance medley relay (1200m, 400m, 800m, 1600m) were added to the meet.[1]

At the 1926 Carnival the championship event of the shuttle hurdle relay was added to the meet. Around that same time the loudspeaker was added to the stadium which helped inform the spectators of the events on the track. Before the loudspeaker, announcers used megaphones to inform spectators.[1]

In an effort to gain more participants in the relays, six new lanes were added to the inside of the track. This renovation allowed for more athletes to compete in the spinning events. That same year the northwest corner of the stadium, that used to be used as the finishing chute, was now used for the paddock area or the area were athletes were lined up and organized before their race. In the 50's the schedule of events was changed around so that the more popular events were run on Saturday afternoon.[1]

The Carnival continued to grow as the years went on. In 1956, the number of spectators reacher over 35,000 people for the first time and 4,000 athletes competed. Then in 1958, 43,618 people attended the meet. In 1962 women competed for the first time in the 100-yard dash. Two years later the high school girls 440-yard relays was added to the carnival. That same year Jamaican high schools started to compete in the meet.[1]

The Marathon was added to the Carnival in 1973. The next year, distance events were moved on the schedule of events to be run on Thursday night after the second day of the decathlon. Then in 1976, the events were converted into meters instead of yards except for the mile and the 4x120-yard shuttle hurdle relay. A year later, automatic timing was used for results instead of hand timing. The carnival turned into a three day meet in 1978 because of the addition of more women's relays.[1]

The Penn Relay Carnival did not only grow in the number of spectators, participants and events, it also started to grow financially. In 1988, the carnival used corporate sponsorship instead of just earning money from tickets sold at the door like it had in the years before. In the years that followed, the crowd and number of participants gradually increased and the carnival would become nationally and internationally more popular.[1]

The 2010 Relays featured a "USA vs. The World" program, pitting American teams against elite runners including Usain Bolt, Shelly Ann Fraser and Alfred Kirwa Yego. The event broke all previous attendance records with a single-day high of 54,310 and the total of 117,346 for the three-day festival.[2]

Franklin Field[edit]

Franklin Field was opened in 1895 specifically for the first Penn Relays Carnival. In this same year, Franklin Field was the site of the nation's first scoreboard. According to the NCAA, Franklin Field is the oldest stadium that functions as both a football field and a track and field stadium.[3] In the fall of 1903, it became the first permanent college stadium in the country and the first stadium with a horseshoe design.[1] The stadium was rebuilt in 1922 to its present day form. The lower deck seating was made more stable and the upper deck seating was added to the stadium to allow for more spectators.[1] After Franklin Field's renovations, it became the first two-tiered stadium and it became home to the first football game to be broadcast on the radio. In 1967 the 10 lane synthetic track was added replacing the old over used track.[1] In 2004, the football field became an artificial turf field. Franklin Field plays host to University of Pennsylvania football games and the Penn Relay Carnival.[3]

Prizes[edit]

The plaque[edit]

The plaque was first given out at the 1925 Penn Relay Carnival. The design that is on the plaque and the medals was created by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie. The picture on the awards features the founder of the University of Pennsylvania, Benjamin Franklin, sitting in his library chair holding a laurel sprig in his left hand. Four nude runners stand facing him in a line all holding hands. The last runner in the line is holding the baton of the relay. Former University of Pennsylvania runners Larry Brown, Louis Madeira, George Orton and Ted Meredith posed as models for the design. The design is carved onto an 18" or 8" bronze plate and mounted on a wooden circle. Around the bronze picture, on the wooden part of the plaque, reads "Relay Carnival" above the design and "University of Pennsylvania" below the design.[1]

Other prizes by event[edit]

College championship relays[edit]

The winning team in the college "Championship of America" relays will receive an 18" bronze plaque. The individuals on the first place relay will receive gold watches. Individuals on the second place team will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third, fourth and fifth place relays will receive bronze medals.[4]

College relays[edit]

The winning teams of the non-championship college relays will receive an 8" plaque. Individuals on the second place team will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third, fourth and fifth place relays will receive bronze medals. The prizes for the college relays are the same for the Military Academies races except the individuals on the first place teams will receive gold watches as well and the plaque.[4]

College championship individual events[edit]

First place individuals receive gold watches. Second will receive silver medals. Third, fourth and fifth receive bronze medals.[4]

College individual events[edit]

First place individuals receive gold medals instead of gold watches. Second will receive silver medals. Third, fourth and fifth receive bronze medals.[4]

High school championship relays[edit]

The winning team in the high school "Championship of America" relays will receive an 18" bronze plaque. The individuals on the first place relay will receive gold watches. Individuals on the second place team will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third, fourth and fifth place relays will receive bronze medals. If a team from outside the United States wins one of these races, they will not receive gold watches. The watches will be given to the first American team in this race.[4]

High school championship individual events[edit]

First place individuals receive gold watches. Second will receive silver medals. Third, fourth and fifth receive bronze medals. Just like in the high school championship relays, the first American individual will receive the gold watch.[4]

Olympic development relays[edit]

The first place relay will receive an 8" bronze plaque. The plaque will go to the first national team whose members are all the same nationality or the first USAT&F registered club whose members are all members of the same club. The individuals on the first place relay will receive gold watches. Individuals on the second place team will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third, fourth and fifth place relays will receive bronze medals.[4]

Olympic development individual events[edit]

First place individuals receive gold watches. Second will receive silver medals. Third, fourth and fifth receive bronze medals.[4]

Masters, Special Olympics, and blind relays[edit]

The first place team will receive an 8" bronze plaque. Individuals on the winning relay will receive gold medals. Individuals on the second place relay will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third fourth and fifth plea teams will receive bronze medals.[4]

Masters, Special Olympics, and blind individual events[edit]

First place individuals receive gold medals. Second will receive silver medals. Third, fourth and fifth receive bronze medals.[4]

IC4A men's and ECAC women's relays[edit]

The winning teams of these relays will receive an 8" plaque. Individuals on the second place team will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third, fourth and fifth place relays will receive bronze medals. If the times of winners of these races are faster than that of the college championship races, they will receive gold watches.[4]

High school Philadelphia, Tri-State, and consolation races[edit]

The first place team will receive an 8" bronze plaque. Individuals on the winning relay will receive gold medals. Individuals on the second place relay will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third fourth and fifth plea teams will receive bronze medals.[4]

High school 4x400m and 4x800m and prep school 4x100m and 4x400m relays[edit]

The first place team will receive an 8" bronze plaque. Individuals on the winning relay will receive gold medals. Individuals on the second place relay will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third place teams will receive bronze medals.[4]

Elementary school, junior high school, middle school, and parochial school relays[edit]

The first place team will receive an 8" bronze plaque. Individuals on the winning relay will receive gold medals. Individuals on the second place relay will receive silver medals. Individuals on the third place teams will receive bronze medals.[4]

In popular culture[edit]

  • In the novel Crash by Jerry Spinelli, a boy is named "Penn" by his great-grandfather, who ran in the Penn Relays. In the end Penn gets to run in the Penn Relays.

World records[edit]

Over the course of its history, one world record has been set at the Penn Relays, although there have been additional world bests in non-IAAF recognized events such as the distance medley relay.

Year Event Record Athlete Nationality
2000 4×200 m relay 1:27.46 LaTasha Jenkins
LaTasha Colander-Richardson
Nanceen Perry
Marion Jones
 United States

Meet records[edit]

Men[edit]

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Ref
100 m 10.10 Leroy Burrell  United States April 1990
Mile 3:53.2 Tony Waldrop  United States 1974
5000 m 13:16.47 Shadrack Kosgei  Kenya 2003
10000 m 27:50.0 Sosthenes Bitok  Kenya 1984
110 m hurdles 13.30 Terrence Trammell  United States 29 April 2000
400 m hurdles 48.91 Derrick Adkins  United States April 1994
3000 m steeplechase 8:24.34 Anthony Famiglietti  United States April 2008
High jump 2.30 m Mark Boswell  Canada April 2000
Tora Harris  United States April 2002
Pole vault 5.79 m Lawrence Johnson  United States April 1996
Triple jump 17.12 m Jerome Romain  United States April 1995
Discus throw 64.26 m Rodney Brown  United States 26 April 2014 [5]
10000 m walk (track) 39:43.85 Tim Seaman  United States 1999
4×100 m relay 37.90 Jamaica Gold
Mario Forsythe
Yohan Blake
Marvin Anderson
Usain Bolt
 Jamaica 24 April 2010 [6]
4×200 m relay 1:19.67 TCU
Lindel Frater
Ricardo Williams
Darvis Patton
Kim Collins

 Jamaica
 Jamaica
 United States
 Saint Kitts and Nevis
29 April 2000
4×400 m relay 2:56.60 USA Red
Angelo Taylor 45.0
Antonio Pettigrew 44.2
Tyree Washington 43.7
Michael Johnson 43.7
 United States 29 April 2000
4×800 m relay 7:11.17 Penn State University
Vance Watson
Steve Shisler
Christ Mills
Randy Moore
 United States 1985
Distance medley relay 9:15.56 Elkanah Angwenyi 2:50.8 (1200m)
Thomas Musembi 45.8 (400m)
Alfred Kirwa Yego 1:46.2 (800m)
Alex Kipchirchir 3:52.8 (1600 m)
 Kenya 29 April 2006
4×110m Shuttle hurdles relay 53.94 South Carolina University
Corey Taylor
Fred Townsend
Charles Ryan
Kenneth Ferguson
 United States 2003

Women[edit]

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Ref
100 m 11.10 Lauryn Williams  United States April 2004
Kelly-Ann Baptiste  Trinidad and Tobago April 2006
Mile 4:26.10 Mary Slaney  United States 1997
5000 m 15:17.11 Laura Mykytok  United States 1995
10000 m 31:30.89 Annette Peters  United States 1997
100 m hurdles 12.61 (+1.1 m/s) Queen Quedith Harrison  United States 24 April 2010 [7]
3000 m steeplechase 9:56.63 Briana Shook  United States 2003
Pole vault 4.45 m Tina Sutej  Slovenia 28 April 2011 [8]
5000 m walk (track) 20:56.88 Michelle Rohl  United States 1996
4×100 m relay 42.19 USA Red
Tianna Madison
Allyson Felix
Bianca Knight
Carmelita Jeter
 United States 28 April 2012 [9]
4×200 m relay 1:27.46 LaTasha Jenkins
LaTasha Colander-Richardson
Nanceen Perry
Marion Jones
 United States 29 April 2000
4×400 m relay 3:21.18 USA Red
Francena McCorory
Allyson Felix
Natasha Hastings
Sanya Richards
 United States 28 April 2012 [9]
4×800 m relay 8:04.31 Team USA Red
Lea Wallace
Brenda Martinez
Ajee' Wilson
Alysia Montano
 United States 27 April 2013 [10]
4×1500 m relay 17:08.34 University of Tennessee
Chanelle Price
Phoebe Wright
Rolanda Bell
Sarah Bowman
 United States 24 April 2009
Sprint medley relay 3:34.56 Sherri-Ann Brooks (200 m)
Rosemarie Whyte(200 m)
Moya Thompson 51.7 (400 m)
Kenia Sinclair 1:57.43 (800 m)
 Jamaica April 2009
Distance medley relay 10:48.38 Villanova University
Kathy Franey 3:20.9 (1200 m)
Michelle Bennet 52.9 (400 m)
Celeste Halliday 2:04.7 (800 m)
Vicki Huber 4:29.9 (1600 m)
 United States April 1988
4×100m Shuttle hurdles relay 52.5 Texas A&M University
Vashti Thomas
Gabby Mayo
Donique Flemings
Natasha Ruddock
 United States 2010

Future dates[edit]

The Penn Relays is always held the last week in April and always begins the Thursday of that week. The exact dates for the next three years have been released on the official site of the Penn Relays Carnival. In 2015 the carnival will go from April 23 till the 25, while in 2016 it will go from April 28 till the 30.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "History of the Penn Relays". Official Site of the Penn Relay Carnival. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  2. ^ Lee, Kirby (2010-04-25). Bolt electrifies record crowd with sub-9 second anchor leg at Penn Relays. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-04-25.
  3. ^ a b "Franklin Field". Official Website of the Penn Relay Carnival. Retrieved 2012-10-18. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Prizes". The Official Site of the Penn Relay Carnival. Retrieved 2012-10-22. 
  5. ^ "Discus Throw Results". www.pennrelaysonline.com. 26 April 2014. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "4x100 Metres Relay Results". www.pennrelaysonline.com. 2010-04-24. Retrieved 2010-04-25. 
  7. ^ "100 Metres Hurdles Results". www.pennrelaysonline.com. 2010-04-24. Retrieved 2010-04-25. 
  8. ^ "Pole Vault Results". www.pennrelaysonline.com. 2011-04-28. Retrieved 2011-05-02. 
  9. ^ a b Kirby Lee (29 April 2012). "Felix paces meet records in 4x100m and 4x400m relays at Penn". IAAF. Retrieved 30 April 2012. 
  10. ^ "4x800m Relay Results". www.pennrelaysonline.com. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  11. ^ "Future Dates". Official Website of the Penn Relay Carnival. Retrieved 2012-10-18. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penn_Relays — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
210887 videos foundNext > 

Men 4x100 with Justin Gatlin Penn Relays 2014 Jamica vs. the World 2014 - 4-26-14

Men 4x100 with Justin Gatlin 2014 - 4-26-14 Penn Relays 2014 Jamica vs. the World. RESULTS (APRIL 26, 2014): PL ...

2012 USA vs The World - Penn Relays Sights & Sounds

Check out Team USA vs The World in the Men's/Women's 4x100, Men's/Women's 4x400, Men's Distance Medley Relay, Women's Sprint Medley Relay Produced & Directed...

Penn Relays: Long Beach Poly Track

Go behind the scenes with an exclusive look at the 2014 Long Beach Poly track team competing at the 120th running of the Penn Relays in Philadelphia. Edited ...

2007 Penn Relays High School Men's 4x 400m Finals

2007 Penn Relays High School Men's 4x 400m Finals Won By: Long Beach Poly Tech 3:09.89.

Penn Relays 2013 Girls 4x800 COA

2013 Penn Relays Girls 4x800 Championship Of America.

2013 Penn Relays Girls 4x100 Relay Championship of America Final!!

Jamaica - Holmwood Tech of Jamaica Wins! LWE Girls first time attending... 4th place! Illinois All Time BEST in the 4x100...46.10. Only 2 USA teams were in t...

The 2013 PENN RELAYS

A Video Essay of the 2013 Penn Relays from a Caribbean Perspective. CaribNation's Sport Anchor Ian Edwards goes behind the scene of this annual University of...

Penn Relays High School 4x400 Final

2011 Penn Relays Elite Men's 4x400

Penn Relays Men's DMR - 4/26/13

Penn State shows how it's done with Brannon Kidder, Brandon Bennett-Grenn, Cas Loxsom & Robbie Creese,

210887 videos foundNext > 

117 news items

Philly.com (blog)

Philly.com (blog)
Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:00:00 -0700

Joe Juliano has been a staff writer for The Inquirer for 20 years, covering college sports, golf and the Penn Relays. Joining Joe this season will be John Stuetz, an intern for The Inquirer and senior at Penn State majoring in print journalism and ...

Philly.com

Philly.com
Sat, 30 Aug 2014 05:45:00 -0700

Joe Juliano has been a staff writer for The Inquirer for 20 years, covering college sports, golf and the Penn Relays. Joining Joe this season will be John Stuetz, an intern for The Inquirer and senior at Penn State majoring in print journalism and ...
 
The Daily Pennsylvanian
Wed, 20 Aug 2014 18:52:30 -0700

Awad grabbed the attention of running fans nationwide with a world-beating spring track season, highlighted by a 3:58.34 mile at the Penn Relays. Awad understands that in order for his team to be successful, he will need to lead them on the course.
 
GoDuke.com
Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:33:45 -0700

Duke's top relay teams and field athletes will then head to Philadelphia, Pa., for the 120th running of the Penn Relays. The team will host the Duke Twilight meet May 6-7 before heading to the ACC Championships. The ACC Outdoor Championships will take ...
 
South Jersey Local News
Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:45:00 -0700

She took 15th at the Penn Relays with a toss of 135-0 (41.16 meters) Lake had a top throw of 142' (43.28 meters) at the tri-meet against Georgian Court University and Lehman College (Apr. 11). She recorded a season best 3,313 points in the heptathlon ...
 
NorthJersey.com
Wed, 20 Aug 2014 21:52:12 -0700

"She's [especially] been a big part of our distance medley team that ran in the Penn Relays." Once medically cleared to run again, Richard combined with Amanda Pook, Hilary McElwain and Catherine Pagano to finish third in the Penn distance medley relay ...

GoPSUsports.com

GoPSUsports.com
Thu, 07 Aug 2014 11:55:13 -0700

During Gondak's eight year tenure at Penn State he has coached 19 First Team All-Americans, 22 Big Ten Champions, had athletes set 20 Penn State school records, five Penn Relays championship wins in distance relays, as well as coaching three of the ...

ECUPirates.com

ECUPirates.com
Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:03:45 -0700

GREENVILLE, N.C. – East Carolina head coach Curt Kraft, the reigning Conference USA Women's Coach of the Year, and his staff welcomed 17 student-athletes to compete in track and field and attend East Carolina University for the 2014-15 academic year.
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Talk About Penn Relays

You can talk about Penn Relays with people all over the world in our discussions.

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!