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Online Etymology Dictionary
Online Etymology Dictionary.jpg
Etymonline.png
Screenshot of etymonline.com
Type Private
Founded Online (c.2000)
Headquarters Lancaster, PA, USA
Key people
Employees 1
Website www.etymonline.com
Type of site Etymological dictionary
Registration no
Available in English
Current status active

The Online Etymology Dictionary is a free online dictionary that describes the origins of English-language words.[1] Its initials are the same as those of the widely cited Oxford English Dictionary.

Description[edit]

Douglas Harper compiled the etymology dictionary to record the history and evolution of more than 30,000 words, including slang and technical terms.[2] The core body of its etymology information stems from the New English Dictionary on Historical Principles but a variety of other sources are used. Other sources include the Middle English Dictionary and the Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology (by Robert Barnhart and others). In producing his large dictionary, Douglas Harper says that he is essentially and for the most part a compiler, an evaluator of etymology reports which others have made.[3]

Reviews and reputation[edit]

The Online Etymology Dictionary has been referenced by Ohio University's Library as a relevant etymological resource[1] and cited in the Chicago Tribune as one of the "best resources for finding just the right word".[4] It is cited in numerous articles as a source for explaining the history and evolution of words.[5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Online Etymology Dictionary". Ohio University. 2003. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  2. ^ "Home Page". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2006-12-31. 
  3. ^ The dictionary's principal sources appear at Sources @ Online Etymology Dictionary.
  4. ^ Bierma, Nathan (3 January 2007). "Internet has best resources for finding just the right word". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2007-01-05. [dead link]
  5. ^ Rudeen, Mike. Any questions?; Ask! away on the News' new blog. Rocky Mountain News, 18 December 2006, republished by www.factiva.com, accessed 2007-01-05
  6. ^ Murali, D. Big results require big ambitions. Business Line (The Hindu), 21 July 2006, Section:Opinion, republished by Factiva.com, accessed 2007-01-05
  7. ^ Whyte, Ellen. Online resources to help improve your vocabulary. New Straits Times, 27 October 2005, republished by www.factiva.com, accessed 2007-01-05

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_Etymology_Dictionary — Please support Wikipedia.
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15 news items

 
Dailyuw
Tue, 15 Apr 2014 20:46:04 -0700

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, when the Dutch first encountered tea in the 1500s in Malaysia, they knew it as “teh.” The OED explains that the latter is a variation of the word as it's spelled in the Min dialect (and its sub-dialect ...
 
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
Thu, 10 Apr 2014 05:11:15 -0700

Much of OK's success can be attributed to its brevity and flexibility, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, which notes "it filled a need for a quick way to write an approval on a document, bill, etc." It has also evolved to fill many other ...
 
gulfnews.com
Sat, 05 Apr 2014 08:56:15 -0700

This term came into English around 1570, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, from French, but it's rooted in Greek. The front end of the word is from 'oligos', meaning 'few'. That arch element, meaning 'rule', is familiar from other words in ...
 
gulfnews.com
Sat, 29 Mar 2014 09:01:11 -0700

The Online Etymology Dictionary notes, “Aristotle's custom was to teach while strolling through the Lyceum in Athens.” Maybe there's a connection with driving. The upside of all my time on the road is that it does give me time to think. New insights ...
 
The Gustavian Weekly (blog)
Fri, 28 Mar 2014 02:33:45 -0700

Perhaps it makes sense that, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word “Lent” comes from the Old English for “springtime” and the West Germanic “long days.” There is a fundamental problem with that image painted above, which some are not ...

Christian Science Monitor

Christian Science Monitor
Thu, 03 Apr 2014 03:07:30 -0700

This term came into English around 1570, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, from French, but it's rooted in Greek. The front end of the word is from oligos, meaning "few." That arch element, meaning "rule," is familiar from other words in ...
 
Newcastle Herald
Fri, 28 Mar 2014 01:11:17 -0700

For your reference, please also note this definition from the Online Etymology Dictionary: Urgent, mid-15c., from Middle French urgent "pressing, impelling" (14c.), from Latin urgentem (nominative urgens), present participle of urgere "to press hard ...
 
Huffington Post
Wed, 26 Mar 2014 05:57:49 -0700

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, earlier versions of the word for the fruit came about around 1300, while it wasn't used as the color until the 1540s. 10. What the heck are "the birds and the bees"? 153803438. The origin of the "birds and ...
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