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Benedict Arnold's Oath of Allegiance, May 30, 1778

An oath of allegiance is an oath whereby a subject or citizen acknowledges a duty of allegiance and swears loyalty to monarch or country. In republics, modern oaths specify allegiance to the country in general, or to the country's constitution. For example, officials in the United States, a republic, take an oath of office that includes swearing allegiance to the United States Constitution. However, in a constitutional monarchy, such as in the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms, oaths are sworn to the monarch.

In feudal times a person would also swear allegiance to his feudal superiors. To this day the oath sworn by freemen of the City of London contains an oath of obedience to the Lord Mayor of the City of London.

Oaths of allegiance are commonly required of newly naturalised citizens (see Oath of Citizenship), members of the armed forces, and those assuming public (particularly parliamentary and judicial) office. Clergy in the Church of England are required to take an Oath of Supremacy acknowledging the authority of the British monarch.

A typical example of an oath of allegiance is that sworn by Members of Parliament in the Netherlands:

I swear (affirm) allegiance to the King, to the Statute for the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and to the Constitution. I swear (affirm) that I will faithfully perform the duties my office lays upon me. So help me God almighty! (This I declare and affirm)[1]

In many Commonwealth realms all that is required is an oath to the monarch, and not the constitution or state. There have been moves in some of the realms to make the oath of citizenship sworn by new citizens refer to the country rather than the monarch. However, the oaths sworn by judges, members of parliament, etc., have not been changed. All of these moves have not succeeded as the Queen is the personification of the Canadian, British, or Australian state (or that of any other Commonwealth realm). Allegiance sworn to the monarch is the same as to the country, its constitution or flag. The New Zealand Oath of Allegiance still refers to the Queen of New Zealand. The European Court of Human Rights ruled in 1999 that the oath of allegiance to a reigning monarch is "reasonably viewed as an affirmation of loyalty to the constitutional principles which support... the workings of representative democracy in the respondent State."[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Translated from the 'Wet beëdiging ministers en leden Staten-Generaal' on [1]. (Dutch)
  2. ^ McGuinness v. United Kingdom; Application No. 39511/98, decision June 8, 1999 Reports and Judgements and Decisions 1999/V, ISBN 3-452-24950-6, p. 483

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oath_of_allegiance — Please support Wikipedia.
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8000 news items

CBS Local

CBS Local
Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:56:15 -0700

DENVER (CBS4) – Forty-nine immigrants from 27 countries are now U.S. citizens after they took the Oath of Allegiance Wednesday afternoon at the History Colorado Center in Denver. “It was my dream to be citizen of America, I love the country,” an ...

San Antonio Express-News (subscription)

San Antonio Express-News (subscription)
Thu, 20 Aug 2015 18:36:11 -0700

Francisco Moreno, 48, of Venezuela, reacts during one of two naturalization ceremonies held by the U.S. Citizens and Immigration Services at the Edgewood Theatre of Performing Arts for a naturalization ceremony, Thursday, August 20, 2015. A total of ...

Washington Free Beacon

Washington Free Beacon
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 09:30:00 -0700

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has denied that the modifications to military service requirements in the Oath of Allegiance published on July 21 flout the law, despite harsh criticism from immigration experts and members of Congress.
 
American Thinker
Wed, 05 Aug 2015 23:17:57 -0700

The Obama administration recently made changes to the Oath of Allegiance to the United States in a manner very conducive to Sharia, or Islamic law. On July 21, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced some “modifications” to the ...
 
Middle East Forum
Thu, 06 Aug 2015 09:55:50 -0700

On July 21, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced some "modifications" to the Oath of Allegiance that immigrants must take before becoming naturalized. The original oath required incoming citizens to declare that they will ...

Communities Digital News

Communities Digital News
Thu, 13 Aug 2015 10:57:43 -0700

The altered story that most of the media covered had three versions: President Obama directly ordered a modification of the oath of allegiance; Obama changed the Pledge of Allegiance; and a new policy changed the oath to affect all newly naturalized ...

Long War Journal

Long War Journal
Fri, 14 Aug 2015 09:18:21 -0700

The Taliban's new leader, Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansour, has accepted the oath of allegiance (bayat) from al Qaeda emir Ayman Zawahiri, as well as the pledges to him from “Jihadi organizations spread throughout the globe.” Mansour's statement was ...
 
Accuracy In Media (blog)
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 09:30:00 -0700

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has denied that the modifications to military service requirements in the Oath of Allegiance published on July 21 flout the law, despite harsh criticism from immigration experts and members of Congress.
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