digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

North American English (NAmE, NAE) is the variety of the English language of North America, including that of the United States and Canada. Because of their shared histories[1] and the similarities between the pronunciation, vocabulary and accent of American English and Canadian English, the two spoken dialects are often grouped together under a single category.[2][3] Due to historical and cultural factors, Canadian English and American English retain numerous distinctions from each other, with the differences being most noticeable in the two languages' written forms. Canadian spellings are primarily based on British usage as a result of Canada's long-standing connections with the United Kingdom. Canadians are generally tolerant of both British and US spellings, with British spellings being favoured in more formal settings and in Canadian print media.[4] Spellings in American English have been highly influenced by lexicographers like Noah Webster, who sought to create a standardized form of English that was independent of British English.[5] Despite these differences, English as it is spoken in both Canada and the United States is similar, with the United Empire Loyalists who fled the American Revolution having had a large influence on the early spoken form of Canadian English.[6]

Some terms in North American English are used almost exclusively in Canada and the United States (for example, the terms diaper and gasoline are widely used instead of nappy and petrol). Although many English speakers from outside North America regard such terms as distinct Americanisms, they are often just as ubiquitous in Canada, mainly due to the effects of heavy cross-border trade and cultural penetration by the American mass media. [7] The list of divergent words becomes longer if considering regional Canadian dialects, especially as spoken in the Atlantic provinces and parts of Vancouver Island where significant pockets of British culture still remain.

There are a considerable number of different accents within the regions of both the United States and Canada, originally deriving from the accents prevalent in different English, Scottish and Irish regions and corresponding to settlement patterns of these peoples in the colonies. These were developed and built upon as new waves of immigration, and migration across the North American continent, brought new accents and dialects to new areas, and as these ways of speaking merged and assimilated with the population. It is claimed that despite the centuries of linguistic changes there is still a resemblance between the English East Anglia accents which would have been used by early English settlers in New England (including the Pilgrims), and modern Northeastern United States accents.[8] Similarly, the accents of Newfoundland have some similarities to the accents of Scotland and Ireland.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Chambers, J.K. (1998). "Canadian English: 250 Years in the Making". The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2nd ed.). p. xi. 
  2. ^ Labov, William; Ash, Sharon; Boberg, Charles (2006). Atlas of North American English: Phonetics, Phonology and Sound Change. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter. ISBN 3-11-016746-8. 
  3. ^ Trudgill, Peter & Jean Hannah. (2002). International English: A Guide to the Varieties of Standard English, 4th. London: Arnold. ISBN 0-340-80834-9 .
  4. ^ Patti Tasko. (2004). The Canadian Press Stylebook: A Guide for Writers and Editors, 13th. Toronto: The Canadian Press. ISBN 0-920009-32-8, p. 308.
  5. ^ "Noah Webster's Spelling Reform," (2011) Merriam-Webster Online, http://www.merriam-webster.com/info/spelling-reform.htm .
  6. ^ M.H. Scargill. (1957). "Sources of Canadian English", The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, 56.4, pp. 610-614.
  7. ^ John Woitkowitz (2012). "Arctic Sovereignty and the Cold War: Asymmetry, Interdependence, and Ambiguity". Retrieved 2012-03-13. 
  8. ^ Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America, David Hackett Fischer, 1989.

References[edit]



Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_English — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
1000000 videos foundNext > 

North American English Pronunciation - /t/ sound deletion in /nt/

In words such as "interview" and "internet", the t sound is often deleted. It is always deleted in fast speech by all dialects of North America, unless the s...

North American English -- Business Communication Idioms

In this video I give some examples of the most common forms of business interraction and polite requests in North American English. You'll probably notice th...

BRITISH V.S. NORTH AMERICAN ACCENTS | RyanThomasWoods

British vs N. American Accents / English vs. Canadian Accents! Inspired by Joey Graceffa's accent video: http://tiny.cc/rrcg1w Get ready for my NEXT video he...

Phonology - English in North America I (Overview)

This E-Lecture discusses the main varieties of English used in North America, i.e. in Canada and the United States. It includes the discussion of historical ...

North American English Pronunciation - Consonants

This video takes you through the mechanics of the pronunciation of consonants. However, you are highly encouraged to ignore the mechanics and imitate the sou...

North American English Pronunciation - /s/ blends and /r/ blends

This video addresses the pronunciation of /spr/, /str/, and /skr/ as in "spray", "street", and "scrap". This is great practice for Spanish speakers and anyon...

North American English Pronunciation - Vowels

This touches briefly on the pronunciation of the vowels in English and their phonetic classification.

North American English Pronunciation - r sound tongue exercises

Many languages have something similar the /r/ sound, but the way it is made is a little different. In English, the /r/ is almost a closed vowel. Knowing this...

North American English Pronunciation - "du"

The written letters "du" are pronounced as either /du/ or /dyu/ but in North America we pronounce the second lexical pronunciation as /dZu/, or the "j" sound...

North American English - /l/ versus /r/, "Warren Buffett"

Warren, wealth, valuable, eventually, Grinnell, Nebraska, investor, philanthropist, philanthropy, pledged, personal frugality, 13, 30, private investor, work...

1000000 videos foundNext > 

4 news items

 
mySanAntonio.com
Sun, 20 Jul 2014 07:48:45 -0700

The man often regarded as the father of this field of research — sociolinguistics — is William Labov, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and co-author of an overview of U.S. and Canadian dialects, "The Atlas of North American English ...
 
Greenfield Daily Reporter
Sun, 20 Jul 2014 07:48:45 -0700

The man often regarded as the father of this field of research — sociolinguistics — is William Labov, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and co-author of an overview of U.S. and Canadian dialects, "The Atlas of North American English ...
 
Washington Post
Wed, 09 Jul 2014 07:54:01 -0700

The man often regarded as the father of this field of research — sociolinguistics — is William Labov, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and co-author of an overview of U.S. and Canadian dialects, “The Atlas of North American English ...
 
Dân Trí
Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:01:30 -0700

Tuy nhiên, sau khi nghe tôi phân tích tiếng Anh chính là ngôn ngữ mẹ đẻ của cô ấy vì ở Canada 75-80% dân số nói tiếng Anh, và tiếng Anh Canada cùng tiếng Anh Mỹ được xếp chung vào nhóm North American English thì cô trò nhỏ của tôi lập tức thay đổi ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Talk About North American English

You can talk about North American English with people all over the world in our discussions.

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!