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Nimda Virus
Technical name Avast: Win32:Nimda
Avira: W32/Nimda.eml
BitDefender: Win32.Nimda.A@mm
ClamAV: W32.Nimda.eml
Eset: Win32/Nimda.A
Grisoft: I-Worm/Nimda
Kaspersky: Net-Worm.Win32.Nimda or I-Worm.Nimda
McAfee: Exploit-MIME.gen.ex
Sophos: W32/Nimda-A
Symantec: W32.Nimda.A@mm
Type Multi-vector worm
Point of origin China (alleged)
Operating system(s) affected Windows 95XP
Written in English

Nimda is a computer worm, also a file infector. It quickly spread, surpassing the economic damage caused by previous outbreaks such as Code Red. Nimda utilized several types of propagation techniques and this caused it to become the Internet’s most widespread virus/worm within 22 minutes.

The worm was released on September 18, 2001.[1] Due to the release date, exactly one week after the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, some media quickly began speculating a link between the virus and Al Qaeda, though this theory ended up proving unfounded.

Nimda affected both user workstations (clients) running Windows 95, 98, Me, NT, 2000 or XP and servers running Windows NT and 2000.

The worm's name origin comes from the reversed spelling of it, which is "admin".

F-Secure found the text[2] "Concept Virus(CV) V.5, Copyright(C)2001 R.P.China" in the Nimda code, suggesting its country of origin.

Methods of infection[edit]

Nimda was so effective partially because it—unlike other infamous malware like the Morris worm or Code Red—uses five different infection vectors:

  • Email
  • Open network shares
  • Browsing of compromised web sites
  • exploitation of various Microsoft IIS 4.0 / 5.0 directory traversal vulnerabilities. (Both Code Red and Nimda were hugely successful exploiting well known and long solved vulnerabilities in the Microsoft IIS server.[3])
  • Back doors left behind by the "Code Red II" and "sadmind/IIS" worms.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.cert.org/historical/advisories/CA-2001-26.cfm CERT first released an advisory on the worm on September 18, 2001
  2. ^ http://www.f-secure.com/v-descs/nimda.shtml
  3. ^ http://seifried.org/lasg/introduction-to-security/

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimda — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

1827 news items

The Killeen Daily Herald

The Killeen Daily Herald
Sun, 28 Jun 2015 02:22:30 -0700

Many other worms — with names such as Pikachu, Anna Kournikova and Nimda — also exploited flaws in Microsoft products. On Dec. 8, 2000, one day after the anniversary of the surprise Japanese attack on U.S. Navy forces in 1941, Clarke — the National ...

Stuff.co.nz

Stuff.co.nz
Fri, 26 Jun 2015 10:01:03 -0700

Many other worms - with names such as Pikachu, Anna Kournikova and Nimda - also exploited flaws in Microsoft products. On December 8, 2000, one day after the anniversary of the surprise Japanese attack on US Navy forces in 1941, Clarke - the National ...

Washington Post

Washington Post
Mon, 22 Jun 2015 10:11:11 -0700

Many other worms — with names such as Pikachu, Anna Kournikova and Nimda — also exploited flaws in Microsoft products. On Dec. 8, 2000, one day after the anniversary of the surprise Japanese attack on U.S. Navy forces in 1941, Clarke — the National ...

Dark Reading

Dark Reading
Wed, 03 Jun 2015 07:32:24 -0700

Nimda was another worm that spread so quickly it surpassed the economic damage caused by all previous malware at that time. Over the past 13 years I learned that we need more heroes and heroines among security professionals if we want to do more than ...
 
Register
Sat, 17 Sep 2011 02:01:01 -0700

Saturday marks the tenth anniversary of the infamous Nimda worm. Nimda (admin spelled backwards) was a hybrid worm that spread via infected email attachments and across websites running vulnerable versions of Microsoft's IIS web server software.
 
Naked Security
Thu, 15 Sep 2011 19:40:21 -0700

Boy, did Nimda show itself. It could spread every-which-way, and it did: by sending itself out to your email contacts; by breaking into web servers and infecting files all over your website; by spreading automatically across your network; and by ...

IHS Jane's 360

IHS Jane's 360
Fri, 01 May 2015 02:35:18 -0700

The Israeli company Nimda, which is carrying out the upgrade, subsequently told IHS Jane's that 710 hp Detroit Diesel Corporation 8V-92TA turbocharged diesel engines and Allison XTG-411-5A fully automatic transmissions were being installed in the ...

TechTarget

TechTarget
Tue, 21 Apr 2015 07:48:43 -0700

SIMDA, which functions in a similar method to the previously seen NIMDA (admin spelled backwards) botnet, is unique in its immense span and its deliberate control of host files. The team's base was in the Singapore INTERPOL office, but the botnet ...
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