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For other people named Mary Bell, see Mary Bell (disambiguation).
Mary Bell
Mary-bell-wiki.jpg
Mary Bell at the time of her arrest in 1968
Born (1957-05-26) 26 May 1957 (age 57)
Newcastle upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom
Other names The Tyneside Strangler
Criminal penalty
12 years imprisonment
Children 1
Parents Betty McCrickett
Conviction(s) Manslaughter
Killings
Date 1968
Killed 2

Mary Flora Bell (born 26 May 1957) is a British woman who, as a child, strangled to death two little boys in Scotswood, an inner-city suburb of Newcastle upon Tyne. She was convicted in December 1968 of the manslaughter of the two boys, Martin Brown (aged four) and Brian Howe (aged three). Bell was 11 when she was convicted for killing Brown and Howe.[1]

Since her release from prison in 1980, she has lived under a series of pseudonyms. Her identity has been protected by a court order, which has also been extended to protect the identity of her daughter. In 1998, Bell collaborated with Gitta Sereny on an account of her life, in which she details the abuse she suffered as a child at the hands of her mother, a prostitute, and her mother's clients.

Early life[edit]

Bell's mother Betty (née McCrickett) was a prostitute, who was often absent from the family home, travelling to Glasgow to work. Mary (nicknamed May)[1] was her first child, born when Betty was 17 years old. It is not known who Mary's biological father was; for most of her life she believed it to be Billy Bell, a habitual criminal, later arrested for armed robbery, who had married Betty some time after Mary was born. Independent accounts from family members strongly suggest that Betty had more than once attempted to kill Mary and make her death look accidental during the first few years of her life.[2][page needed] Mary herself says she was subjected to repeated sexual abuse, her mother forcing her from the age of four to engage in sexual acts with men.[2][page needed]

The killings[edit]

On 25 May 1968, the day before her 11th birthday, Mary Bell strangled four-year-old Martin Brown in a derelict house.[1] She was believed to have committed this crime alone. Between that time and a second killing, she and a friend, Norma Joyce Bell (1955–89; no relation), aged 13, broke into and vandalised a nursery in Scotswood, leaving notes that claimed responsibility for the killing. The police dismissed this incident as a prank.[3]

On 31 July 1968, the two girls took part in the death, again by strangulation, of three-year-old Brian Howe, on wasteland in the same Scotswood area.[1] Police reports concluded that Mary Bell had later returned to his body to carve an "N" into his stomach with a razor; this was then changed using the same razor but with a different hand to an "M". Mary Bell also used a pair of scissors to cut off some of Howe's hair, scratch his legs, and mutilate his penis. As the girls were so young and their testimonies contradicted each other, the precise details of what happened have never been entirely clear.

An open verdict had originally been recorded for Brown's death as there was no evidence of foul play – although Bell had strangled him, her grip was not hard enough to leave any marks.[4] Eventually, his death was linked with Howe's killing and in August 1968 the two girls were charged with two counts of manslaughter.

Conviction[edit]

On 17 December 1968, at Newcastle Assizes, Norma Bell was acquitted but Mary Bell was convicted of manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, the jury taking their lead from her diagnosis by court-appointed psychiatrists who described her as displaying "classic symptoms of psychopathy". The judge, Mr. Justice Cusack, described her as dangerous and said she posed a "very grave risk to other children". She was sentenced to be detained at Her Majesty's pleasure, effectively an indefinite sentence of imprisonment. She was initially sent to Red Bank secure unit in St. Helens, Lancashire – the same facility that would house Jon Venables, one of James Bulger's child killers, 25 years later.[1]

After her conviction, Bell was the focus of a great deal of attention from the British press and also from the German Stern magazine. Her mother repeatedly sold stories about her to the press and often gave reporters writings she claimed to be by her daughter. Bell herself made headlines when, in September 1977, she briefly absconded from Moore Court open prison, where she had been held since her transfer from a young offenders institution to an adult prison a year earlier. Her penalty for this was a loss of prison privileges for 28 days.[5]

For a time, Bell also lived in a girls' remand home at Cumberlow Lodge in South Norwood (in a house built by Victorian inventor William Stanley).[6][7]

Life after prison[edit]

In 1980, Bell, aged 23, was released from Askham Grange open prison, having served 12 years, and was granted anonymity (including a new name) allowing her to start a new life. Four years later she had a daughter, born on 25 May 1984; Bell's daughter did not know of her mother's past until Bell's location was discovered by reporters and she and her mother had to leave their house with bed sheets over their heads.

Bell's daughter's anonymity was originally protected only until she reached the age of 18. However, on 21 May 2003, Bell won a High Court battle to have her own anonymity and that of her daughter extended for life. Any court order permanently protecting the identity of a convict in Britain is consequently sometimes known as a "Mary Bell order."

In 2009, it was reported that Bell had become a grandmother.[8]

Books about the case[edit]

Bell is the subject of two books by Gitta Sereny: The Case of Mary Bell (1972), an account of the killings and trial, and Cries Unheard: the Story of Mary Bell (1998), an in-depth biography based on interviews with Bell and relatives, friends and professionals who knew her during and after her imprisonment.[2] This second book was the first to detail Bell's account of sexual abuse by her mother, a prostitute who specialised as a dominatrix, and her mother's clients.

The publication of Cries Unheard was controversial because Bell received payment for her participation. The payment was criticised by the tabloid press, and Tony Blair's government attempted to find a legal means to prevent its publication on the grounds that a criminal should not profit from his or her crimes, but the attempt was unsuccessful.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "17 December: 1968: Mary Bell found guilty of double killing". BBC On This Day (BBC News). 17 December 1968. Retrieved 12 May 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c Sereny, Gitta (1998). Cries Unheard: the Story of Mary Bell. London: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-73524-2. 
  3. ^ The Case of Mary Bell: A Portrait of a Child Who Murdered, page 115, Gitta Sereny, 1972
  4. ^ Wilson, Colin. "Mary Bell must not disappear". Daily Mail (London). 
  5. ^ "Street parties for the Queen". Our Century. Express & Star. 
  6. ^ Akpan, Eloïse (2000). The Story of William Stanley – A Self-made Man. London: Eloïse Akpan. p. 40. ISBN 0-9538577-0-0. 
  7. ^ "Cumberlow lodge, approved school and remand home south Norwood; General LCC/CH/D/CUM/1 [n.d.]". The National Archives. 
  8. ^ Seamark, Michael; Sims, Paul (9 January 2009). "Child killer Mary Bell becomes a grandmother at 51: But all I have left is grief, says victim's mother". Daily Mail (London). 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bell — Please support Wikipedia.
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231 news items

Daily Star

Daily Star
Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:03:45 -0700

Others include child killer Mary Bell and James Bulger's murderers Robert Thompson and Jon Venables. Carr's former neighbours in her hometown of Grimsby, north-east Lincolnshire, threatened she would be “beaten and stoned” if she ever returned.
 
hngnews.com
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:48:45 -0700

Retired educator Mary Bell spoke on student hunger and in favor of funding allotment for lunch accounts where money is owed and for snacks at school buildings. Bell said the Sun Prairie Action Resource Coalition (SPARC) and its SnackSmart program, ...

Evening Standard

Evening Standard
Thu, 24 Jul 2014 04:34:41 -0700

Why Mulcaire met Mary Bell, and what happened. So these few weeks are just a lull. We're yet to hear why so many of Mulcaire's files are missing, who deleted Milly Dowler's voicemail to give parents that monstrous “false hope” moment, which other ...
 
Indiana Gazette
Wed, 23 Jul 2014 07:37:30 -0700

REUNION: A reunion for the descendants of Bennett and Mary Bell Warden Van Horn will be held at 1 p.m. Aug. 3 at Blue Spruce Park, Pavilion 1A. Those attending are asked to bring a covered dish and a homemade item for the silent auction. Plates ...

Plymouth Herald

Plymouth Herald
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:52:30 -0700

WINSTON and Mary Joan Bell of Peverell, celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary with cream teas, religious blessings and picnics. The couple have been together for the past 65 years, and married for the last 60, after meeting on Winston's first ...
 
Post-Bulletin
Wed, 16 Jul 2014 05:13:24 -0700

Check the schedule online, at www.riverrootsschool.org, or give Mary Bell a call at 507-467-2928. Sponsored From Around the Web. 'Steroid Alternative' Putting Gyms Out of Business. Gorgeous New Tanner Flying Off Shelves. These 5 Signs Warn You That ...

WCTI12.com

WCTI12.com
Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:50:46 -0700

According to the Highway Patrol, the wreck happened on Highway 70 near Carolina Pines at about 1:05 p.m. Friday. Mary Bell, a Havelock resident in her 60s, was driving a red Toyota Camry and trying to cross Highway 70 when her vehicle was t-boned by a ...
 
MassLive.com
Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:30:00 -0700

“One project to consider for the drop-in knitting times in August and September is making a pink scarf for Rays of Hope,” said Adult Services Librarian Mary Bell. Rays of Hope is an annual walk for breast cancer survivors and their families, headed by ...
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