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Mahi-mahi
Coryphaena hippurus.png
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Coryphaenidae
Genus: Coryphaena
Species: C. hippurus
Binomial name
Coryphaena hippurus
Linnaeus, 1758
Synonyms
  • Scomber pelagicus Linnaeus, 1758
  • Coryphaena fasciolata Pallas, 1770
  • Coryphaena chrysurus Lacepède, 1801
  • Coryphaena imperialis Rafinesque, 1810
  • Lepimphis hippuroides Rafinesque, 1810
  • Coryphaena immaculata Agassiz, 1831
  • Lampugus siculus Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena scomberoides Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena margravii Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena suerii Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena dorado Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena dolfyn Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena virgata Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena argyrurus Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena vlamingii Valenciennes, 1833
  • Coryphaena nortoniana R. T. Lowe, 1839
  • Coryphaena japonica Temminck & Schlegel, 1845
Young fisherman with dolphinfishes from Akrotiri (Minoan civilisation).

The mahi-mahi or common dolphinfish[2] (Coryphaena hippurus) is a surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore temperate, tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Also known widely as dorado, it is one of two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the pompano dolphinfish.

The name mahi-mahi means very strong in Hawaiian. In other languages the fish is known as dorade coryphène, lampuga, llampuga, lampuka, lampuki, rakingo, calitos, or maverikos.

Nomenclature[edit]

The common English name of dolphin causes much confusion. This fish is not related to the marine mammals also known as dolphins (family Delphinidae). Additionally, two species of dolphinfish exist, the common dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) and the pompano dolphin (Coryphaena equiselis). Both these species are commonly marketed by their Pacific name, mahi-mahi.

The fish is called mahi-mahi in the Hawaiian language,[3] and "mahi mahi" and "mahi-mahi" are commonly used elsewhere.[4]

In the Pacific and along the English speaking coast of South Africa they are also commonly called by the Spanish name, Dorado[citation needed]. In the Mediterranean island of Malta, this fish is referred to as the lampuka.[5]

Linnaeus named the genus, derived from the Greek word, koryphe, meaning top or apex, in 1758. Synonyms for the species include Coryphaena argyrurus, Coryphaena chrysurus and Coryphaena dolfyn.[2]

General statistics[edit]

Mahi-mahi can live up to 5 years, although they seldom exceed four. Catches average 7 to 13 kilograms (15 to 29 lb). They seldom exceed 15 kilograms (33 lb), and mahi-mahi over 18 kilograms (40 lb) are exceptional.

Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending nearly the entire length of their bodies. Their caudal fins and anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, and bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. Females have a rounded head. Females are also usually smaller than males.

The pectoral fins of the mahi-mahi are iridescent blue. The flank is broad and golden. 3 black diagonal stripes appear on each side of the fish as it swiftly darts after prey.

Out of the water, the fish often change color (giving rise to their Spanish name, dorado, "golden"), going though several hues before finally fading to a muted yellow-grey upon death.

Mahi-mahi are among the fastest-growing fish. They spawn in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year, and their young are commonly found in seaweed. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other forage fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton and crustaceans.

Males and females are sexually mature in their first year, usually by 4–5 months old. Spawning can occur at body lengths of 20 cm. Females may spawn two to three times per year, and produce between 80,000 and 1,000,000 eggs per event.

In waters averaging 28 °C/83 °F, mahi-mahi larvae are found year-round, with greater numbers detected in spring and fall. In one study, seventy percent of the youngest larvae collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico were found at a depth greater than 180 meters. Spawning occurs normally in captivity, with 100,000 eggs per event. Problems maintaining salinity, food of adequate nutritional value and proper size, and dissolved oxygen are responsible for larval mortality rates of 20-40%. [6] Mahi-mahi fish are mostly found in the surface water. Juveniles feed on shrimp, fish and crabs found in rafts of Sargassum weeds. Their flesh is soft and oily, similar to sardines. The body is slightly slender and long, making them fast swimmers; they can swim as fast as 50 knots (92.6 km/h, 57.5 mph).[7]

Recreational fishing[edit]

Main article: Mahi-mahi fishing

Mahi-mahi are highly sought for sport fishing and commercial purposes. Sport fishermen seek them due to their beauty, size, food quality, and healthy population. Mahi-mahi is popular in many restaurants.

Mahi-mahi can be found in the Caribbean Sea, on the west coast of North and South America, the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic coast of Florida and West Africa, South China Sea and Southeast Asia, Hawaii and many other places worldwide.

Fishing charters most often look for floating debris and frigatebirds near the edge of the reef in about 120 feet (37 m) of water. Mahi-mahi (and many other fish) often swim near debris such as floating wood, palm trees and fronds, or sargasso weed lines and around fish buoys. Sargasso is floating seaweed that sometimes holds a complete ecosystem from microscopic creatures to seahorses and baitfish. Frigatebirds dive for food accompanying the debris or sargasso. Experienced fishing guides can tell what species are likely around the debris by the birds' behavior.

Thirty- to fifty-pound gear is more than adequate when trolling for mahi-mahi. Fly-casters may especially seek frigatebirds to find big mahi-mahis, and then use a bait-and-switch technique. Ballyhoo or a net full of live sardines tossed into the water can excite the mahi-mahis into a feeding frenzy. Hookless teaser lures can have the same effect. After tossing the teasers or live chum, fishermen throw the fly to the feeding mahi-mahi. Once on a line, mahi-mahi are fast, flashy and acrobatic, with beautiful blue, yellow, green and even red dots of color.

Commercial fishing[edit]

The United States and the Caribbean countries are the primary consumers of this fish, but many European countries are increasing their consumption every year.[citation needed] It is a popular eating fish in Australia, usually caught and sold as a by-product by tuna and swordfish commercial fishing operators. Japan and Hawaii are significant consumers. The Arabian Sea, particularly the coast of Oman, also has mahi-mahi. At first, mahi-mahi were mostly bycatch (incidental catch) in the tuna and swordfish longline fishery. Now they are sought by commercial fishermen on their own merits.

In French Polynesia, fishermen use harpoons, using a specifically designed boat, the poti marara, to pursue it, because mahi-mahi do not dive. The poti marara is a powerful motorized V-shaped boat, optimized for high agility and speed, and driven with a stick so the pilot can hold his harpoon with his right hand.

Environmental and food safety concerns[edit]

Depending on how it is caught, mahi-mahi is classed differently by various sustainability rating systems. It is also a potential vector of toxic microorganisms.

  • The Monterey Bay Aquarium classifies mahi-mahi, when caught in the US Atlantic, as a Best Choice, the top of its three environmental impact categories. The Aquarium advises to avoid imported mahi-mahi harvested by long line but rates troll and pole-and-line caught as a Good Alternative.
  • The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) classifies mahi-mahi caught by line/pole in the US as "Eco-Best" in its three-category system,[9] but classifies all mahi-mahi caught by longline as only "Eco-OK" or "Eco-Worst" due to longline "high levels [of] bycatch, injuring or killing seabirds, sea turtles and sharks."[10]

The mahi-mahi is also a common vector for ciguatera poisoning.[11]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Collette, B., Acero, A., Amorim, A.F., Boustany, A., Canales Ramirez, C., Cardenas, G., Carpenter, K.E., de Oliveira Leite Jr., N., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Fredou, F.L., Graves, J., Viera Hazin, F.H., Juan Jorda, M., Minte Vera, C., Miyabe, N., Montano Cruz, R., Nelson, R., Oxenford, H., Schaefer, K., Serra, R., Sun, C., Teixeira Lessa, R.P., Pires Ferreira Travassos, P.E., Uozumi, Y. & Yanez, E. 2011. Coryphaena hippurus. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 June 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Coryphaena hippurus". FishBase. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Mary Kawena Pukui and Samuel Hoyt Elbert (2003). "lookup of dolphin". in Hawaiian Dictionary. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii Press. 
  4. ^ "Common names of Coryphaena hippurus". Fishbase. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "Maltese cuisine". Wikipedia. 
  6. ^ Bostwick, Joshua (2000). "Coryphaena hippurus". Animal Diversity Web. Retrieved August 17, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Hardhead Catfish_ Arius felis". 
  8. ^ "Consumer Guide to Mercury in Fish". 
  9. ^ "Seafood Selector: Find a Fish". 
  10. ^ "Mahimahi, imported longline, Eco-Worst". 
  11. ^ "Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP)". Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. Retrieved 2010-01-04. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahi-mahi — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
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2418 news items

 
Asbury Park Press
Thu, 21 Aug 2014 14:07:58 -0700

Heating up the inshore action are bonito and mahi-mahi that are feeding on sand eels on the ridges. The Barnegat Ridge is all lit up Capt. Dave DeGennaro of the Hi Flier said. He said besides the usual small chicken dolphin there are 10- to 20-pound bulls.
 
Tampabay.com
Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:27:01 -0700

What's hot: Anglers fishing offshore in late summer often encounter mahi mahi — also known as dolphin. While the bay area is not generally regarded as a hot spot, they do make a welcome addition for anglers who are ready when they appear. In most ...
 
ConnectAmarillo.com powered by KVII
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 07:48:45 -0700

Pour over mahi mahi, red peppers, pineapple and green onions in a shallow container and cover. Refrigerate 30 min to 1 hour to marinate. Drain and discard marinade. Preheat your grill to medium high heat. Thread fish, veggies and pineapple alternately ...
 
Undercurrent News
Mon, 25 Aug 2014 23:16:36 -0700

Hayduk's processing plant in Paita receives around 120t of giant squid, up to 60t of hake and 50t of mahi mahi per day, of which the company aims to distribute 5-10% to domestic market with this new line. Although this is a small percentage compared ...

FlaglerLive.com

FlaglerLive.com
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:39:42 -0700

When any restaurant closes, it's a loss in choice, a loss to the business landscape, a loss to taste buds. When Blue at the Topaz announced this week that it had served its last meal on Sunday, it was a shock. Eighteen people had lost their job. An ...
 
Tulsa World (blog)
Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:01:35 -0700

Gulf mahi-mahi Oscar-style with lobster claw meat and jalapeno cilantro bearnaise highlight the Thursday night special this month at Boston Deli, 6231 E. 61st St. The dinner also includes grilled asparagus with chile ginger drizzle, Spanish rice with ...
 
Press of Atlantic City
Mon, 11 Aug 2014 15:29:23 -0700

Kyle Killen with mahi-mahi. Photo provided by Sterling Harbor Marina | Posted: Monday, August 11, 2014 6:15 pm. Kyle Killen, 16, of Wildwood, shows his first-ever mahi-mahi, a 15-pounder he caught while trolling the Elephant Trunk area on Greg Bulifant ...
 
Press of Atlantic City
Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:30:09 -0700

Ashley Lucadema with 45-inch mahi. Photo by Sterling Harbor Marina | Posted: Monday, August 25, 2014 6:08 pm. Ashley Lucadema, of Cape May Court House, caught this 45-inch mahi-mahi while trolling the South Shoal area.
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