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James of Venice[1] was a significant translator of Aristotle of the twelfth century. He has been called the first systematic translator of Aristotle since Boethius.[2] Not much is otherwise known about him.[3]

He was active in particular in Constantinople;[4] he translated the Posterior Analytics from Greek to Latin in the period 1125-1150.[5][6] This made available in Western Europe for the first time in half a millennium what was then called the New Logic, in other words the full Organon.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Giacomo da Venezia, Jacobus Veneticus Grecus, Iacobus Veneticus Graecus, Jacobus Clericus de Venetia, Jacobus de Venetiis.
  2. ^ Walter Berschin - 4. Venice
  3. ^ PDF, p. 5.
  4. ^ Translators
  5. ^ PDF
  6. ^ [1] gives the date 1128 for several works.

References[edit]

  • L. Minio-Paluello, Iacobus Veneticus Grecus: Canonist and Translator of Aristotle. Traditio 8 (1952), 265–304
  • Sten Ebbesen (1977). Jacobus Veneticus on the Posterior Analytics and Some Early Thirteenth-century Oxford Masters on the Elenchi. Cahiers de l'Institut du moyen âge grec et Latin 2, 1-9.

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