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Guru Arjan
ਗੁਰੂ ਅਰਜਨ
Guru Arjan being pronounced fifth guru
Guru Arjan being pronounced as fifth Guru
Born 2 May 1563 (1563-05-02)
Goindval, Tarn Taran, India
Died 30 May 1606 (1606-05-31) (aged 43)
Lahore, Pakistan
Other names The Fifth Master
Years active 1581–1606
Known for Compiled and installed the Adi Granth; built the Harmandir Sahib.
Predecessor Guru Ram Das
Successor Guru Hargobind
Spouse(s) Mata Ganga
Children Guru Hargobind
Parents Guru Ram Das and Mata Bhani

Guru Arjan ([ɡʊru əɾdʒən]; 15 April 1563 – 30 May 1606) was the first Sikh martyr and the fifth of the eleven Sikh Gurus, who compiled writings to create the eleventh, the living Guru, Guru Granth Sahib. He was born in Goindval, Punjab the youngest son of Guru Ram Das and Bibi Bhani, the daughter of Guru Amar Das.[1]

Guru Arjan lived as the Guru of Sikhism for a quarter of a century. Guru Arjan completed the construction of Amritsar and founded other cities, such as Taran Taran and Kartarpur. The greatest contribution he made to the Sikh faith was to compile all of the past Gurus' writings, along with selected writings of other saints from different backgrounds which he considered consistent with the teachings of Sikhism into one book, now the holy scripture: the Guru Granth Sahib. It is, perhaps, the only script which still exists in the form first published (a hand-written manuscript) by the Guru.[2]

Guru Arjan organised the Masand system, a group of representatives who taught and spread the teachings of the Gurus and also received the Dasvand, partial offering of a Sikh's income (in money, goods or service) that Sikhs paid to support the building of Gurdwara Sahib, Langar (shared communal kitchens) originally intended to share with sense of love, respect and equality, still an important element today in any Gurdwara. The Langars were open to any visitors and were designed from the start to stress the idea of equality and a casteless society.

Life[edit]

Continuing the efforts of Guru Ramdass, Guru Arjan established Amritsar as a primary Sikh pilgrimage destination. He wrote a voluminous amount of Sikh scripture including the popular Sukhmani Sahib.

Compiling the Adi Granth, Guru Arjan gave Sikhs an example of religious and moral conduct, as well as a rich body of sacred poetry. His starting of collection of offerings by way of Masand system, in a systematic way, accustomed them to a regular government. He traded in horses, though not extensively, and encouraged his followers to follow his example, to be as zealous in trade as they were in their faith.[3] Guru Arjan became famous among his pious devotees and his biographers dwell on the number of Saints and Holy men who were edified by his instructions.[3] He was equally heeded by men in high positions. During his time, the teaching and philosophy of Guru Nanak took a firm hold on the minds of his followers.

The economic well-being of the country is closely linked with the monsoon. With a view to alleviating the sufferings of the peasants, Guru Arjan helped the villagers in digging six-channel Persian wheel (Chhehrta) wells, which irrigated their fields. Chheharta is a living monument of his efforts in this direction.

Martyrdom[edit]

Guru Arjan included the compositions of both Hindu and Muslim saints which he considered consistent with the teachings of Sikhism. In 1606, the Muslim Emperor Jahangir ordered that he be tortured and sentenced to death after he refused to remove all Islamic and Hindu references from the Holy book.[4] He was made to sit on a burning hot sheet while boiling hot sand was poured over his body. After enduring five days of unrelenting torture Guru Arjan was taken for a bath in the river. As thousands watched he entered the river never to be seen again.[5]

Jahangir was angered by the number of Muslims who converted to Sikhism. Professor J. F. Richard's view that Jahangir was "persistently hostile to popularly venerated religious figures"[6] is instructive, though it appears that Jahangir only took action against religious figures he saw as threats to the state.

Historical turning point[edit]

J.S. Grewal notes that Sikh sources from the seventeenth and eighteenth century contain contradictory reports of Guru Arjan's death.[7] the author of the Bichitra Natak, mentions Guru Arjan only once, to record that "when Arjan departed this life for the divine abode, [the Guru] assumed the form of Hargobind."[8]

Bhai Gurdas, a contemporary of Guru Arjan and noted Sikh chronicler, recorded his death.[9] In the 1740s, Chaupa Singh, who was close to Guru Gobind Singh, placed the blame on Chandu Shah, a Hindu official in Lahore, who Chaupa Singh accused of having the Guru arrested and executed after he turned down Chandu Shah's offer of marriage between Chandu's daughter and Hargobind.[10]

A contemporary Jesuit account, written in 1606 by Father Jerome Xavier, who was in Lahore at the time records that the Sikhs managed to get Jahangir to commute the death sentence to a heavy fine, for which a rich individual, possibly a Sikh, stood as guarantor.[11] The Guru however refused to let a fine be paid for him and even refused when a longtime friend of his, Sai Mian Mir, tried interceding on his behalf. Jahangir tortured Guru Arjan in the hopes of extracting the money, but the Guru refused to give in and so attained martyrdom. The other near-contemporary non-Sikh source, a 1640s chronicle probably written by a Parsi, supports this view.[12]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mcleod, Hew (1997). Sikhism. London: Penguin Books. p. 28. ISBN 0-14-025260-6. 
  2. ^ Mahajan, Vidya Dhar. "Ch. 10". Muslim Rule In India (fifth ed.). p. 232. 
  3. ^ a b Cunningham, J.D. (1853). "Gooroo Arjoon". A History of the Sikhs. John Murray. 
  4. ^ "Guru Arjan". 26 October 2009. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "Guru Arjan, 1563-1606". 26 October 2009. BBC. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Richards, John F. The Mughal Empire, in The New Cambridge History of India. 1, 5. Gen eds. Chris Bayly, Gordon Johnson, John F. Richards. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, p. 97.
  7. ^ J.S. Grewal, The Sikhs of the Punjab, in The New Cambridge History of India. 2, 3. Gen eds. Chris Bayly, Gordon Johnson, John F. Richards. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998, pp. 63-64.
  8. ^ Bachiatr Natak, 5:11Bachiatr Natak, 5:11
  9. ^ Vir Singh, ed. Varam Bahi Gurdas Satki, 9th edition. New Delhi: Bhai Vir Singh Sahitya Sadan, 1997), p. 386.
  10. ^ W. H. McLeod, ed. and trans. The Chaupa Singh Rahit-nama. Dunedin: University of Otago Press, 1987), p. 107.
  11. ^ Father Jerome to Father Gasper Fernandes, (BM add MS 9854, ff. 38-52), 1617, in Sicques, Tigers or Thieves: Eyewitness Accounts of the Sikhs (1606-1809). Eds. Amandeep Singh Madra and Parmjit Singh. Palgrave Macmillan, 2004, p. 7.
  12. ^ Mobad', Dabistan-i Mazahib, 1645-46, in Sikh history from Persian sources. Eds. J.S. Grewal and Irfan Habib. Indian History Congress: Tulika, 2001. p. 67.

References[edit]

  1. Tuzuk-i-Jahagiri or Memoirs of Jahagir, Translated by Alexander Rogers. Edited by Henry Beveridge Published by Low Price Publication. lppindia.com. ISBN 978-81-7536-148-5
  2. History of the Panjab, Syad Muhammad Latif, Published by: Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. ISBN 978-81-7096-245-8
  3. Philosophy of 'Charhdi Kala' and Higher State of Mind in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, Dr. Harjinder Singh Majhail, 2010, Published by: Deepak Publishers, Jalandhar, Punjab, India. ISBN 81-88852-96-1
  4. SIKH HISTORY IN 10 VOLUMES,Dr Harjinder Singh Dilgeer, Published by: The Sikh University Press, Brussels, Belgium. ISBN 2- 930247-41-X

External links[edit]

Preceded by:
Guru Ram Das
(24 September 1534 – 1 September 1581)
Guru Arjan Followed by:
Guru Har Gobind
(5 July 1595 – 19 March 1644)

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guru_Arjan — Please support Wikipedia.
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6 news items

 
Deccan Chronicle
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:30:00 -0700

Guru Arjan says, “Of all the 84 lakh species, God gave superiority to man”. Human birth is attained because of good fortune and is therefore the right medium to attain salvation. Human body helps the self to merge with the Absolute. Guru Arjan says ...
 
Hindustan Times
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 07:15:00 -0700

Guru Arjan Dev, fifth of the 10 Sikh Gurus, had compiled the Adi Granth (the First Rendition) at Ramsar Sahib with the help of his devoted disciple Bhai Gurdas. After the scripture was compiled, Baba Buddha, first head granthi of Harmandir Sahib, had ...
 
Times of India
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:11:15 -0700

AMRITSAR: Disappointed over the lackadaisical attitude and false promises of the Punjab government to build the Ramgarhia Gate, one of the 12 historical entry points of the walled city of Amritsar, All India Jassa Singh Ramgarhia Federation has ...

Niticentral

Niticentral
Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:27:04 -0700

However, it is not from these inhumane, twisted and extremist ideologues that we must seek wisdom, inspiration and direction, but from the shining beacons of humanity, community-cohesion and integration such as the fifth Sikh Guru, Sri Guru Arjan Dev ...

SikhSangat News

SikhSangat News
Sun, 24 Aug 2014 13:08:01 -0700

It took seven years to complete the initial work and the foundation stone for the present Gurdwara was laid by Guru Arjan Sahib in December 1588. When the holy scripture of Sikhism was finished in 1604, it was placed in the temple and remains there today.
 
Hindustan Times
Mon, 04 Aug 2014 21:49:29 -0700

Second guru Angad Dev and fifth guru Arjan Das had not visited the area while fourth guru Ramdass had come to Kurukshetra before attaining the guruship,” said the gurdwara manager. After the for mation of Haryana Sikh Gurdwara Management Committee ...
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