digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:


Applied sciences






















Fort Gulick was a U.S. Army base in the former Panama Canal Zone located on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal near Fort Davis, on Gatun Lake.


Buildings of the Escuela de las Americas (2006)

It was perhaps best known as the location of the School of the Americas. In 1984, control of the fort was turned over to the Republic of Panama who renamed it Fuerte Espinar. The U.S. retook over administration of the fort as a result of the 1989 United States invasion of Panama but kept the name of Fort Espinar.

The former site of Fort Gulick is now part of the municipal district of Colón, Panama and is the location of the Hotel Melia [1].

Military history[edit]

Abandoned bowling alley in Fort Gulick

During the period of 1973–1979, Fort Gulick was home to Company B, 4th Battalion 10th Infantry. The rest of the 4th Battalion 10th Infantry was located at Fort Davis while construction of the barracks was on-going. This assignment gave Company B a unique training environment. The Company supported the U.S. Army School of the Americas during its tactical exercises at Fort Sherman and the Pina Training area as well as supporting the 3rd Battalion 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), whose home Fort Gulick was.

The 7th Special Forces was headquartered at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, but had the 3rd Battalion at Fort Gulick. Prior to the 7th SFG(A) deploying to Canal Zone, the 8th Special Forces Group had operated in the Central and South American area. One of the 8th SFG(A) historic participation was in the training of a Bolivian Ranger unit to pursue Ernesto "Che" Guevara and his guerrillas.

Along with the above mentioned units, the 549th MP Company also called Fort Gulick home for extended periods of time. The companies moved from Fort Gulick to Fort Davis and back multiple times (two confirmed moves happened in 1962 and 1984) for various administrative reasons. The 549th MP and 3/7 SFG barracks were "next-door neighbors" on Fort Gulick, with only 20 meters separating the buildings.

The Panama Canal Treaties of 1977 called for the USA to turn Fort Gulick over to the Panamanian government in August–September of 1984. In fulfillment of these terms, the 549th MP Company, The Provost Marshal's Office (PMO) and 3/7 SFG moved their commands and barracks back to Fort Davis, which had been their former and long time home while in the Republic of Panama. These units remained on Fort Davis until The United States turned over all installations to the Panamanian government.

During (and previous to) this time, Fort Gulick had been jointly occupied by the US Army and the Panamanian Defense Forces (PDF). The PDF barracks also enjoyed residence on Fort Gulick as did the US Army School of The Americas. In late 1984, the School of the Americas also lost its home on Fort Gulick and was relocated to Fort Benning in The United States.

Fort Gulick went through several rapid name changes when control was given over to the Panamanian government, among those being Fort Manuel Antonio Noriega and Fort Jose Domingo Espinar. It was eventually given its current name, Fort Espinar.

Fort Gulick map, 1979


1. Fort Gulick Dependent School 227298 (used after school for Martial Arts Classes). 2. 3rd Bn, 7th SFG(A) Buildings 232298 to 234298. 3. School of Americas building 243293 (now Hotel Melia). 4. Atlantic Area Command (USARSO) 233297 (at bottom of building was Post Office. 5. Company B, 4th Battalion 10th Infantry (two buildings, formerly of 3rd Bn, 7th SFG(A) 233296. (Note: UTM designators are not added.)

See also[edit]


  • Military Railroads on the Panama Canal Zone by Charles S. Small, Railroad monographs 1982

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 9°19′N 79°52′W / 9.317°N 79.867°W / 9.317; -79.867

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Gulick — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

36 news items

The Sentinel

The Sentinel
Sun, 30 Aug 2015 09:20:08 -0700

He served honorably in the US Army from 1954 to 1956, primarily at Fort Gulick in the Panama Canal Zone. Mr. Clark was a graduate student at the American College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania where he studied Financial Services. He was a Chartered Life ...

Daytona Times

Daytona Times
Thu, 23 Jul 2015 18:11:04 -0700

Jackson later crossed multiple continents that included overseas tours of duty in Korea as well as Fort Gulick, an Army base in the Republic of Panama. It was in Korea that Jackson gravitated toward mediation and race relations. “I was a part of a ...

The People's Voice

The People's Voice
Thu, 30 Jul 2015 23:22:30 -0700

The RTC is also linked to the U.S. Army's Southern Command at Fort Gulick in the Panama Canal Zone. The RTC is run by the generals from the fourth floor of the National Palace Annex. The U.S. Agency for International Development has said that the RTC ...

teleSUR English

teleSUR English
Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:22:30 -0800

The U.S. Army School of the Americas was located in Fort Gulick on the banks of the canal, a base not only for training officers in anti-democratic and abusive methods, but for sharing intelligence as part of Operation Condor's assassination program in ...
The Big Lead
Sun, 26 Jan 2014 11:31:01 -0800

My dad had us in Fort Gulick, Panama. We were in Heidelberg, Germany, Fort Meade, Maryland, Fort Lewis, Washington, and Fort Ord, California was our home base.” To get here within view of those familiar orange roofs on a military base, Ron Rivera had ...
NBCNews.com (blog)
Thu, 28 Feb 2013 08:00:39 -0800

Almost immediately, the ACSI (Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence), General Harold Aaron flew to Fort Gulick and ordered me to "Keep your hands off of Manuel Noriega! He has immense value at the highest levels." I then learned that DCI George ...
Council On Hemispheric Affairs
Wed, 24 Jun 2009 10:51:58 -0700

Opened in 1946 at Fort Gulick in the former U.S. Panama Canal Zone, the School of the Americas (SOA) has, over its lifetime, trained more than 64,000 Latin American and Caribbean members of the uniformed armed forces in an extensive program of military ...
Upside Down World
Fri, 09 Dec 2011 14:03:40 -0800

While a civilian academy, the project brings up bad memories of Fort Gulick in the Panama Canal Zone, the original home of the School of the Americas which trained military forces from throughout Latin America many implicated in crimes against humanity.

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight