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Dadiah is a traditional fermented milk of West Sumatra, Indonesia prepared with fresh, raw and unheated buffalo milk

Fermented milk products, also known as cultured dairy foods, cultured dairy products, or cultured milk products, are dairy foods that have been fermented with lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, and Leuconostoc. The fermentation process increases the shelf-life of the product, while enhancing the taste and improving the digestibility of milk. There is evidence that fermented milk products have been produced since around 10,000 BC.[1] A range of different Lactobacilli strains has been grown in laboratories allowing for a wide range of cultured milk products with different tastes.

Products[edit]

Many different types of cultured milk products can be found around the world.

Soured milk[edit]

Country/region of origin Product(s)
acidophilus milk
buttermilk
cheese
curd
Armenia matzoon
Arab World leben, kishk
Central Asia ayran, chal/shubat, kumis, qurt, qatyq, tan, yogurt
Brittany laezh-ribod
Bulgaria kiselo mlyako
Czech Republic kefir or Acidofilni mleko
Denmark kærnemælk, tykmælk, and ymer
Estonia soured milk and kefir
Finland piimä and viili
Germany Sauermilch or Dickmilch (soured milk or thickened milk)
Georgia matsoni
Greece Xynogalo or Xynogala
Hungary aludttej
Iceland skyr and súrmjólk
India dahi, lassi, chaas, mattha, mishti doi and shrikhand
Indonesia dadiah
Iran doogh, kashk
Middle East leben
Japan calpis
Lithuania rūgpienis, kefir
Macedonia kiselo mleko
Mexico jocoque
Netherlands karnemelk (buttermilk)
Norway surmelk or kulturmelk, kefir, and tjukkmjølk[2]
Pakistan dahi and lassi
Poland kwaśne or zsiadłe mleko (soured milk) and kefir
Romania lapte bătut, lapte acru, kefir and sana
Russia, Ukraine, Belarus kefir, prostokvasha, ryazhenka and varenets
Rwanda kivuguto
Scotland blaand
Serbia kiselo mleko and yogurt
Slovakia kefir or acidofilne mlieko
Slovenia kislo mleko
South Africa amasi ("maas" in Afrikaans)
Sweden filmjölk, långfil and A-fil (fil is the short form of filmjölk)
Turkic countries ayran, qatiq
United States clabber
Bosnia and Herzegovina kiselo mlijeko and kefir
Zimbabwe lacto
Burundi urubu
Kenya kule naoto, maziwa lala
Ethiopia ergo
Sudan rob

Soured cream[edit]

Country/region of origin Product(s)
cheese
sour cream
Central Asia kaimak
Central & Eastern Europe smetana
Croatia mileram/kiselo vrhnje
Finland kermaviili
France crème fraîche
Iceland sýrður rjómi
Hungary tejföl
Lithuania grietinė
Mexico crema/cream espesa
Norway rømme
Romania smântână
Serbia kisela pavlaka
Sweden gräddfil

Comparison chart[edit]

Product Alternative names Typical milkfat content Typical shelf life at 4°C Fermentation agent Description
Cheese 1-75% varies a variety of bacteria and/or mold Any number of solid fermented milk products.
Crème fraîche creme fraiche 30-40% 10 days[1] naturally occurring lactic acid bacteria in cream Mesophilic fermented cream, originally from France; higher-fat variant of sour cream
Cultured sour cream sour cream[3] 14–18%[3] 4 weeks[1] Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis*[3] Mesophilic fermented pasteurized cream with an acidity of at least 0.5%. Rennet extract may be added to make a thicker product.[3] Lower fat variant of crème fraîche
Filmjölk fil 0.1-4.5% 10–14 days[1] Lactococcus lactis* and Leuconostoc[4][5] Mesophilic fermented milk, originally from Scandinavia
Yogurt yoghurt, yogourt, yoghourt 0.5–4% 35–40 days[1] Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus[3] Thermophilic fermented milk, cultured with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus
Kefir kephir, kewra, talai, mudu kekiya, milkkefir, búlgaros 0-4% 10–14 days[1] Kefir grains, a mixture of bacteria and yeasts A fermented beverage, originally from the Caucasus region, made with kefir grains; can be made with any sugary liquid, such as milk from mammals, soy milk, or fruit juices
Kumis koumiss, kumiss, kymys, kymyz, airag, chigee 4%? 10–14 days[1] Lactobacilli and yeasts A carbonated fermented milk beverage traditionally made from horse milk
Viili filbunke 0.1-3.5% 14 days[1] Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis* biovar. diacetylactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and Geotrichum candidum[6] Mesophilic fermented milk that may or may not contain fungus on the surface; originally from Sweden; a Finnish specialty[6]
Cultured buttermilk 1–2% 10 days[1] Lactococcus lactis*[3] (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis*, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris)[1] Mesophilic fermented pasteurized milk
Acidophilus milk acidophilus cultured milk 0.5-2% 2 weeks[1] Lactobacillus acidophilus[1][3] Thermophilic fermented milk, often lowfat (2%, 1.5%) or nonfat (0.5%), cultured with Lactobacillus acidophilus

* Streptococcus lactis has been renamed to Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Fermented Milk Products". Canadian Dairy Commission. 2007-06-06. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  2. ^ "From local food to terroir product ? - Some views about Tjukkmjølk, the traditional thick sour milk from Røros, Norway". 2005-05-04. Retrieved 2008-09-04. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g pavlaka "Newer Knowledge of Dairy Foods: Other: Kinds of Other Dairy Foods". National Dairy Council. Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Filmjölk" (in Swedish). Arla Foods. Retrieved 2007-06-29. 
  5. ^ "Ekologisk filmjölk" (in Swedish). Arla Foods. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  6. ^ a b "Viili: the Finnish specialty" (PDF). Valio Foods & Functionals (Valio) 2003 (2): 4–5. 2003. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  7. ^ Schleifer KH, Kraus J, Dvorak C, Kilpper-Balz R, Collins MD, Fischer W (1985). "Transfer of Streptococcus lactis and related streptococci to the. genus Lactococcus gen. nov.". Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 6: 183–195. doi:10.1016/s0723-2020(85)80052-7. ISSN 0723-2020. 

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_milk_products — Please support Wikipedia.
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252 news items

 
ProCon.org
Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:33:45 -0800

The consumption of cheese and fermented milk products such as yogurt were not associated with increased fractures and mortality rates, and in fact women with high intakes of those products had lower fracture and mortality rates. Hip fractures and ...

Detroit Free Press

Washington Post
Fri, 31 Oct 2014 09:18:45 -0700

In fact, in Michaelsson's analysis, each serving of cheese or fermented milk products reduced rates of mortality and hip fractures by 10-15 percent. According to Michaelsson, the results suggest that more research is needed to understand whether a ...
 
Record Bee
Tue, 18 Nov 2014 09:37:30 -0800

LAKEPORT >> Desiree Todd will demonstrate fermented milk products including clabber cheese, yogurt and buttermilk on Nov. 22 at 2 p.m. at the Lakeport Library. Milk-producing societies around the world have used cultured dairy products for hundreds of ...
 
MarketPulse (blog)
Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:56:15 -0800

Yakult Honsha Co. plunged 5.5 percent after Paris-based Danone was said to be considering selling its 20 percent stake in the Japanese maker of fermented milk products. Honda Motor Co., which gets about 80 percent of its sales abroad, lost 2.2 percent.

Medical Daily

Live Science
Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:55:00 -0700

The researchers found that fermented milk products, like cheese and yogurt — which contain little or no galactose — had the opposite effect: Women who ate or drank the most fermented milk products were less likely to die or sustain fractures during ...
 
Medscape
Thu, 06 Nov 2014 10:09:11 -0800

[19-21] Indeed, a high intake of fermented milk products has been associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular diseases,[18,22-24] whereas a high milk intake is related to a tendency of an unfavourable risk profile for the development of diabetes ...

The Epoch Times

UK Progressive Magazine
Sun, 09 Nov 2014 13:56:15 -0800

But the authors don't believe that's likely, as higher consumption of cheese and yogurt, fermented milk products, was actually linked to reduced bone fractures. They also said that people in the study who consumed more milk and did not have bone ...
 
Newsmax Health
Tue, 18 Nov 2014 11:18:45 -0800

Commercials have touted that "Milk does a body good," but a new study shows it may be too much of a good thing. Swedish researchers found that instead of helping lower the risk of bone fractures, drinking a lot of milk didn't lower the risk of ...
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