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Human Resources Macon, Georgia, 1909
Main article: Overexploitation

The exploitation of natural resources[when defined as?] started to emerge in the 19th century as natural resource extraction developed. During the 20th century, energy consumption rapidly increased. Today, about 80% of the world’s energy consumption is sustained by the extraction of fossil fuels, which consists of oil, coal and gas.[1] Another non-renewable resource that is exploited by humans are Subsoil minerals such as precious metals that are mainly used in the production of industrial commodities. Intensive agriculture is an example of a mode of production that hinders many aspects of the natural environment, for example the degradation of forests in a terrestrial ecosystem and water pollution in an aquatic ecosystem. As the world population rises and economic growth occurs, the depletion of natural resources influenced by the unsustainable extraction of raw materials becomes an increasing concern.[2]

Why resources are under pressure[edit]

  • Increase in the sophistication of technology enabling natural resources to be extracted quickly and efficiently. E.g., in the past, it could take long hours just to cut down one tree only using saws. Due to increased technology, rates of deforestation have greatly increased
  • Cultures of consumerism. Materialistic views lead to the mining of gold and diamonds to produce jewelry, unnecessary commodities for human life or advancement.
  • Non-equitable distribution of resources.

Problems arising from the exploitation of natural resources[edit]

Effects on local communities[edit]

The Global South[edit]

When a mining company enters a developing country to extract raw materials, advocating the advantages of the industry’s presence and minimizing the potential negative effects gain cooperation of the local people. Advantageous factors are primarily in economic development so services that the government could not provide such as health centers, police departments and schools can be established.[3] However with economic development, money becomes a dominant subject of interest. This can bring about major conflicts that a local community in a developing country has never dealt with before.[4] These conflicts emerge by a change to more egocentric views among the locals influenced by consumerist values.[5]

The effects of the exploitation of natural resources in the local community of a developing country are exhibited in the impacts from the Ok Tedi Mine. After BHP, now BHP Billiton, entered into Papua New Guinea to exploit copper and gold, the economy of the indigenous peoples boomed. Although their quality of life has improved, initially disputes were common among the locals in terms of land rights and who should be getting the benefits from the mining project.[6] The consequences of the Ok Tedi environmental disaster illustrate the potential negative effects from the exploitation of natural resources. The resulting mining pollution includes toxic contamination of the natural water supply for communities along the Ok Tedi River, causing widespread killing of aquatic life. When a mining company ends a project after extracting the raw materials from an area of a developing country, the local people are left to manage with the environmental damage done to their community and the long run sustainability of the economic benefits stimulated by the mining company’s presence becomes a concern.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Planas, Florent. "The Exploitation of Natural Resources". Un An Pour La Planete. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  2. ^ McNicoll, Geoffrey (2007). "Population and Sustainability". Handbook of Sustainable Development. Edward Elgar Publishing. pp. 125–139. Retrieved 2012-03-13. 
  3. ^ Pedro, Antonio M.A. (2004). Mainstreaming Mineral Wealth in Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategies. Economic Commission for Africa. pp. 5–6. ISBN 9789211250978. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Pegg, Simon (2006). "Mining and poverty reduction: Transforming rhetoric into reality". Journal of Cleaner Production (Elsevier) 14 (3-4): 376–387. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2004.06.006. ISSN 0959-6526. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  5. ^ Weber-Fahr, M.; Strongman, J.; Kunanayagam, R.; McMahon, G.; Sheldon, C. (2001). "Mining and Poverty Reduction". Noord Internationaal WB PRSP Sourcebook. pp. 4–6. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  6. ^ Bray, John (2003). "Attracting Reputable Companies to Risky Environments: Petroleum and Mining Companies". Natural Resources and Conflict: Options and Actions. World Bank Publications. pp. 287–347. Retrieved 2012-03-12. 
  7. ^ Brereton, D; Forbes, P. (2004). "Monitoring the Impact of Mining on Local Communities: A Hunter Valley Case Study". CSRM. pp. 12–13. 

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploitation_of_natural_resources — Please support Wikipedia.
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1057 news items

Awoko

Awoko
Fri, 05 Sep 2014 09:41:15 -0700

Highlighting the history of the extractive sector, she said the sector is littered with the exploitation of natural resources, particularly forestry and diamond mining, has fuelled conflict and exacerbated problems of weak governance and corruption ...
 
Junkee
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:41:15 -0700

... talking animals young audiences might expect. And in updating the action to the present day, the themes of class and colonialism that marked the original Burroughs story morph into contemporary concerns over corporate exploitation of natural resources.

Mother Earth News

Mother Earth News
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:03:45 -0700

The exploitation of natural resources and reliance on coal powered plants and nuclear energy plants will lead to a dismal future if solution based renewable energy systems are not replaced as the norm. Luckily, individuals like Aur Beck are shedding ...

Forbes

Forbes
Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:01:54 -0700

Fifty years ago, “72% of the top 50 U.S. companies by market capitalization still owed their positions to the control and exploitation of natural resources.” But in the latter part of the 20th century, a new kind of organization began to emerge: an ...

Philippine Star

Philippine Star
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:56:15 -0700

As such, Poe urged more mining firms to join the Philippine Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an international standard for transparency in the reporting of revenues generated from the exploitation of natural resources. She ...

teleSUR English

teleSUR English
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:48:45 -0700

... from the dictatorship and still in force in the country despite a few modifications. In their opinion, the Constitution imposes a neoliberal model of economy, merchandizes health, housing, education, in addition with the over-exploitation of ...
 
THISDAY Live
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:11:15 -0700

This was followed by several incentives to maximise exploitation of natural resources. In the 1990s, the federal government redoubled its SME development effort via the creation of the Peoples Bank of Nigeria (PBN) and Small and Medium Industries ...
 
postzambia.com
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 00:29:29 -0700

The continued indiscriminate and uncontrolled exploitation of natural resources is indicative of an unplanned, impulsive development of the nation's resources. The apparent lack of coordination in the manner the country's resources are exploited will ...
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