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Any product defined as a drug under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act must have an associated Drug Identification Number (or DIN).

The Drug Identification Number (DIN) is the 8 digit number located on the label of prescription and over-the-counter drug products that have been evaluated by the Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD) and approved for sale in Canada. The DIN is typically an eight digit number.

Once a drug has been approved, the Therapeutic Products Directorate issues a DIN which permits the manufacturer to market the drug in Canada. For drugs where there is minimal market history in Canada, there is a more stringent review and the drug is required to have a Notice of Compliance and a DIN in order to be marketed in Canada.

A DIN lets the user know that the product has undergone and passed a review of its formulation, labeling and instructions for use. A drug product sold in Canada without a DIN is not in compliance with Canadian law.

The DIN is also a tool to help in the follow-up of products on the market, recall of products, inspections, and quality monitoring. A drug product can be looked up via its DIN with the Health Canada's Drug Product Database (DPD) to find specific information of drugs approved by the Ministry.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michael Gabay (10 March 2015). The Clinical Practice of Drug Information. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. pp. 53–. ISBN 978-1-284-02623-8. 

External Links[edit]



Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_Identification_Number — Please support Wikipedia.
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256 news items

VUE Weekly

VUE Weekly
Wed, 13 Jan 2016 12:47:13 -0800

Authorized health products—products that have been assessed by Health Canada and are legally sellable—should have an eight-digit Drug Identification Number (DIN), a Natural Product Number (NPN) or a Homeopathic Medicine Number (DIN-HM) on the ...

The Globe and Mail (subscription)

The Globe and Mail (subscription)
Sun, 26 Jul 2015 08:05:13 -0700

... Ont.-based Tweed Marijuana Inc. (CVE:TWD). However, medical marijuana producers still have one major hurdle to overcome before insurers begin routinely funding the drug – cannabis currently doesn't have a drug identification number, known as a DIN.
 
Regulatory Focus
Tue, 29 Sep 2015 12:37:15 -0700

CMI manufactures cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals, including a digestive enzyme therapy, according to its website. The company says it has a Drug Establishment License and owns the rights to many Drug Identification Number products ...

Huffington Post Canada

Huffington Post Canada
Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:59:19 -0800

In Canada, all authorized drug products, be they prescription or over-the-counter, are assigned a Drug Identification Number (DIN) by Health Canada. This computer-generated eight digit number is displayed on a products' packaging and uniquely ...
 
Lexology (registration)
Thu, 06 Aug 2015 09:07:30 -0700

In order to sell a drug on the Canadian market, the manufacturer (or “sponsor”) must obtain a Drug Identification Number (“DIN”) and a Notice of Compliance (“NOC”) for the product. The Food and Drug Regulations outline the requirements to obtain a DIN ...
 
Energy and Capital
Wed, 29 Jul 2015 07:03:45 -0700

In Canada, insurers won't typically cover a drug unless the government assigns it a drug identification number (DIN). A spokesperson for Canadian Life and Health Insurance recently told reporters that if medical marijuana could be issued a DIN, it's ...

Civilized (blog)

Civilized (blog)
Mon, 30 Nov 2015 05:07:30 -0800

It has no drug identification number. So the seminar was a sobering experience in many ways. It was a reminder of how much work there is to build awareness about the medical benefits of cannabis. But change is coming. Clinical trials are starting ...
 
Leafly
Mon, 03 Aug 2015 13:39:01 -0700

New York's medical cannabis program made a major announcement, Minnesota patients are pinching pennies to get their medicine, the governor of Wyoming is looking at legalization, and if you're a Canadian patient, your wallet might be getting a break ...
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