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Deinopidae
Deinopis subrufa
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Suborder: Araneomorphae
Superfamily: Uloboroidea
Family: Deinopidae
C. L. Koch, 1850
Genera
Diversity
4 genera, 57 species

The spider family Deinopidae consists of stick-like elongate spiders that build unusual webs that they suspend between the front legs. When prey approaches, the spider will stretch the net to two or three times its relaxed size and propel itself onto the prey, entangling it in the web. Because of this, they are also called net-casting spiders. Their excellent night-vision adapted posterior median eyes allow them to cast this net over potential prey items. These eyes are so large in comparison to the other six eyes that the spider seems to have only two eyes.

The genus Deinopis is the best known in this family. Spiders in this genus are also called ogre-faced spiders, due to the imagined similarity between their appearance and that of the mythological creature, the ogre. It is distributed nearly worldwide in the tropics, from Australia to Africa and the Americas. In Florida, Deinopis often hangs upside-down from a silk line under palmetto fronds during the day. It emerges at night to practice its unusual prey capture method on invertebrate prey.

The genus Menneus is also known as "humped-back spider", and Avellopsis as "camel-backed spider".

The entire family is cribellate.[1]

Genera[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coddington, J.A. & Levi, H.W. (1991). Systematics and Evolution of Spiders (Araneae). Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 22:565-592

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinopidae — Please support Wikipedia.
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12 videos foundNext > 

A Net-Casting Spider is Trapping a Prey With a Cobweb Sack Using its Legs

High Quality: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ehjos8Zc3E&fmt=35 A scene from the BBC's "Life in the Undergrowth" showing a tight triangular net used to catc...

Spider (Deinopidae) with special catching device - Edderkopp med kastenot (Deinopidae)

I nattemørket i jungelen i Itatiaia nasjonalpark fikk vi øye på en edderkopp med en fantastisk måte å fange maten sin på. Arter tilhørende familien Deinopida...

Diving Bell Spiders

Real Science: The diving bell spider or water spider, Argyroneta aquatica, is the only species of spider known to live entirely under water.Argyroneta aquati...

Ogre-faced Net-casting Spider catching a huge beetle

This is the Ogre-face Net-casting Spider that we were lucky enough to film catching a beetle mid flight. The speed and accuracy of these spiders is incredibl...

Net casting spider. Amazing

Amazing spider that throws its net over it's prey! Sorry recorded with my ipod very poor quality.

Net-Casting Spider Catching A Fly

Deinopis sling catching a fruit fly.

Deinopis strikes but misses.

Even though she misses i still feel honoured to have been a handful of people ever to catch this on camera.

Motionen klarer de sku selv!

Ja, ved os er der ingen grund til at ride hestene... Motionen står de sku selv for! ;) De havde nok været i gang i 5 min, inden vi filmede og forsatte nok 5-...

Vi fanger dyr

ja.

Stick Spider Attack!

Just a bit of fun - no spider was harmed in the making of this video - sorry if you need to change your underwear. =D.

12 videos foundNext > 

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