digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

Deepstaria enigmatica
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Cnidaria
Class: Scyphozoa
Order: Semaeostomeae
Family: Ulmaridae
Genus: Deepstaria
Species: D. enigmatica
Binomial name
Deepstaria enigmatica
Russell, 1967

Deepstaria enigmatica, is a jellyfish of the family Ulmaridae first described in 1967 by F.S. Russel. The bell of this jellyfish is very thin and wide (up to approx. 60 cm), and resembles a translucent, undulating sheet or lava lamp as the animal moves. They are usually found in Antarctic and near-Antarctic seas but have been spotted in waters near the United Kingdom, at depths of 829 to 1830 meters.[1][2]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deepstaria enigmatica". Antarctic Invertebrates. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 12 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "The Cascade Creature". Antarctic Invertebrates. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 19 May 2012. 

External links[edit]



Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepstaria_enigmatica — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

384 news items

 
Daily Mail
Sat, 12 May 2012 07:59:26 -0700

A mysterious ocean 'blob', recorded by a deep-sea remote-controlled underwater camera, has been identified as a jelly fish. When a Youtube video of the creature was posted last month speculators suggested it was everything from the remains of a whale ...
 
Deep-Sea News
Wed, 09 May 2012 17:38:21 -0700

In 1967, F.S. Russell described a very enigmatic deep-sea jellyfish, Deepstaria enigmatica. During Dive 159 of the U.S. research submersible Deepstar 400 on 22 October 1966 Dr. Eric G. Barham, Dr. George Pickwell, and Mr. Ronald Church collected a ...
 
Green Prophet
Sat, 19 May 2012 12:26:00 -0700

But alas the verdict has been finally reached, the species is in fact a (collapsed) Deepstaria Enigmatica, a rare jellyfish species that resembles a translucent satin sheet or “lava lamp”. This species was first captured on camera in 1967 (below) and ...
 
NPR (blog)
Tue, 22 May 2012 09:06:29 -0700

Those gonads vaguely resembled a similar organ in a giant jellyfish called Deepstaria enigmatica. (Strange what marine biologists think about ...) As for its shape, alone in quiet water, these big jellyfish look like you'd expect; bell-shaped tops ...

Daily Mail

Daily Mail
Sun, 14 Dec 2014 21:19:07 -0800

A giant mystery sea creature is thought to have been spotted in the turquoise waters of one of New Zealand's most idyllic bays. A huge unexplained wake can be seen in a Google Earth image of Oke Bay, in the Bay of Islands, an area on the east coast of ...
 
Deep-Sea News
Sun, 29 Jun 2014 17:06:14 -0700

On May 9th of 2012, I wrote about a video going viral of an odd creature in the deep sea. The running hypothesis among online communities is was it was a whale placenta. It was not, more interesting it was the rather enimagic Deepstaria reticulum, one ...

KpopStarz

KpopStarz
Thu, 14 Nov 2013 08:00:36 -0800

"Steven Haddock, a scientist for the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in Moss Landing, Calif., says that the mysterious creature is a Deepstaria enigmatica jellyfish, much to the chagrin of some Reddit users who thought it was a whale placenta ...
 
La Repubblica
Mon, 14 May 2012 05:42:18 -0700

In molti credevano fosse un fake, alcuni una placenta e altri addirittura una busta di plastica. La risposta è arrivata grazie all'aiuto dei due esperti: si tratta di un esemplare di Deepstaria enigmatica e le strane appendici individuate non sarebebro ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight