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Daniel Boorstin
Daniel Boorstin.jpg
12th Librarian of Congress
In office
November 12, 1975 – September 14, 1987
President Gerald Ford
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Lawrence Mumford
Succeeded by James Billington
Personal details
Born Daniel Joseph Boorstin
(1914-10-01)October 1, 1914
Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
Died February 28, 2004(2004-02-28) (aged 89)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Alma mater Harvard University
Balliol College, Oxford
Yale University

Daniel Joseph Boorstin (October 1, 1914 – February 28, 2004) was an American historian at the University of Chicago, writing on many topics in American history and world history. He was appointed twelfth Librarian of the United States Congress in 1975 and served until 1987. He was instrumental in the creation of the Library of Congress Center for the Book.

Repudiating his youthful membership in the Communist Party while a Harvard undergraduate (1938–39), Boorstin became a political conservative and a prominent exponent of consensus history. He argued in The Genius of American Politics (1953) that ideology, propaganda, and political theory are foreign to America. His writings were often linked with such historians as Richard Hofstadter, Louis Hartz and Clinton Rossiter as a proponent of the "consensus school," which emphasized the unity of the American people and downplayed class and social conflict. Boorstin especially praised inventors and entrepreneurs as central to the American success story.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Boorstin was born in 1914, in Atlanta, Georgia, into a Jewish family. His father was a lawyer who participated in the defense of Leo Frank, a Jewish factory superintendent who was accused of the rape and murder of a teenage girl. After Frank's 1915 lynching led to a surge of anti-Semitic sentiment in Georgia, the family moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma, where Boorstin was raised. He graduated from Tulsa's Central High School at the age of 15.[3] He graduated with highest honors from Harvard, studied at Balliol College, Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, receiving BA and BCL degrees and earned an SJD degree at Yale University. He was a professor at the University of Chicago for 25 years and was the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge in 1964. He also served as director of the National Museum of History and Technology of the Smithsonian Institution.

Boorstin wrote more than 20 books, including two major trilogies, one on the American experience and the other on world intellectual history. The Americans: The Democratic Experience, the final book in the first trilogy, received the 1974 Pulitzer Prize in history. Boorstin's second trilogy, The Discoverers, The Creators and The Seekers, examines the scientific, artistic and philosophic histories of humanity, respectively.

In his “Author’s Note” for The Daniel J. Boorstin Reader (Modern Library, 1995), he wrote, “Essential to my life and work as a writer was my marriage in 1941 to Ruth Frankel who has ever since been my companion and editor for all my books.” Her obituary in the Washington Post (December 6, 2013) quotes Boorstin as saying, “Without her, I think my works would have been twice as long and half as readable.”

Within the discipline of social theory, Boorstin's 1961 book The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-events in America is an early description of aspects of American life that were later termed hyperreality and postmodernity. In The Image, Boorstin describes shifts in American culture – mainly due to advertising – where the reproduction or simulation of an event becomes more important or "real" than the event itself. He goes on to coin the term pseudo-event, which describes events or activities that serve little to no purpose other than to be reproduced through advertisements or other forms of publicity. The idea of pseudo-events anticipates later work by Jean Baudrillard and Guy Debord. The work is an often used text in American sociology courses, and Boorstin's concerns about the social effects of technology remain influential.[4]

When President Gerald Ford nominated Boorstin to be Librarian of Congress, the nomination was supported by the Authors Guild but opposed by liberals. He was attacked by the American Library Association because Boorstin "was not a library administrator". The Senate confirmed the nomination without debate.[5]

Boorstin died of pneumonia February 28, 2004, in Washington.[3] He is survived by his three sons, Paul, Jonathan and David, six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Honors[edit]

Boorstin was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure, First Class, by the Japanese government in 1986. He was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for writing The Americans: The Democratic Experience.[3] He was inducted into the Tulsa Hall of Fame in 1989, and received the Oklahoma Book Award in 1993 for The Creators.[3] He held twenty honorary degrees, including an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Tulsa[3] and Doctor of Letters from Oglethorpe University in 1994.[6]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alan J. Levine (2011). Bad Old Days: The Myth of the 1950s. Transaction Publishers. pp. 81–82. 
  2. ^ Pole (1969)
  3. ^ a b c d e Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Boorstin, Daniel J. (1914–2004)."
  4. ^ "Daniel J. Boorstin, RIP". The New Atlantis. Spring 2004. 
  5. ^ Robert Wedgeworth (1993). World Encyclopedia of Library and Information Services. American Library Association. pp. 137–38. 
  6. ^ "Honorary Degrees Awarded by Oglethorpe University". Oglethorpe University. Retrieved 2015-03-06. 

Further reading[edit]

  • John Y. Cole (March 30, 2006). "Jefferson's Legacy: A Brief History of the Library of Congress – Librarians of Congress". Library of Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2008. 
  • Diggins, John P. "The Perils of Naturalism: Some Reflections on Daniel J. Boorstin's Approach to American History." American Quarterly (1971): 153-180. in JSTOR
  • Morgan, Edmund S. "Daniel J. Boorstin, 1 October 1914 · 28 February 2004," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (2006) 150#2 pp. 347–351 in JSTOR
  • Pole, J. R. "Daniel J. Boorstin." in Past-masters: Some Essays on American Historians edited by Marcus, Cunliffe and Robin Winks (1969). pp to 10-38
  • King, Wayne and Warren Weaver Jr. "Briefing: Boorstin and the Emperor", The New York Times, May 2, 1986.
  • Wilson, Clyde N. Twentieth-Century American Historians (Gale: 1983, Dictionary of Literary Biography, volume 17) pp 79–85

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Lawrence Q. Mumford
Librarian of Congress
1975–1987
Succeeded by
James H. Billington

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_J._Boorstin — Please support Wikipedia.
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375 news items

The Christian Century

The Christian Century
Wed, 20 Apr 2016 03:52:30 -0700

In his book Hidden History: Exploring Our Secret Past, Daniel J. Boorstin explains the historical difference between a traveler and a tourist. In previous centuries, travelers were those interested in unfamiliar settings and wild encounters that ...
 
The Weekly Standard (blog)
Thu, 31 Mar 2016 20:56:15 -0700

Billington, in his turn, had succeeded Daniel J. Boorstin, the famous University of Chicago historian, who had been named by Gerald Ford. Past librarians of Congress include the poet/diplomat Archibald MacLeish. These were not role models for kids, ...

Boston College Chronicle

Boston College Chronicle
Thu, 07 Apr 2016 07:52:59 -0700

... Michael and Helen Lee Distinguished Scholar at BC Law and is newly named the Founders Professor of Law in recognition of her teaching and scholarship—joins such eminent historians as Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., George F. Kennan, Daniel J. Boorstin, ...

Forbes

Forbes
Sat, 26 Mar 2016 09:34:43 -0700

The 20th century American historian Daniel J. Boorstin spoke of such discoverers as being finders: “[They] show us what [they] already knew was there”, and, while they may be necessary for succeeding in the present, this might not be the leadership ...
 
Dnevnik.bg - Новини, анализи и коментари
Mon, 04 Apr 2016 07:26:30 -0700

Да, ако са нови превозните средства. Да, ако има гъвкаво таксуване. Да, ако е редовен. Да, но само за единичните билети. Не, първо да се подобри качеството. Не, да се преборят с гратисчиите. Не, колата е алтернатива след като бензинът ...

Inside Higher Ed

Inside Higher Ed
Thu, 25 Feb 2016 00:04:20 -0800

Library groups on Wednesday endorsed President Obama's plans to nominate Carla D. Hayden as the next librarian of Congress, saying she would bring much-needed experience with library technology to the institution. In a statement, Obama said Hayden ...

PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour
Mon, 25 Jan 2016 18:06:54 -0800

Fewer than 200 bronze sculptures from the Hellenistic era -- a period that began more than 2,000 years ago -- survive today. About a quarter of those are gathered in an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art called "Power and Pathos," which offers a ...

The Week Magazine

The Week Magazine
Sun, 27 Sep 2015 05:56:15 -0700

The Americans: The National Experience by Daniel J. Boorstin (Vintage, $18). This rich little book opens with the story of how the "City Upon a Hill" prospered because it was really a city on the sea. That marvelously evocative detail begins the voyage ...
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