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This article is about the cycle of violence within one person's pattern of abuse. For a broader pattern of violence and intergenerational cycle of violence, see Cycle of violence.
The four phases of the Cycle of Abuse

The cycle of abuse is a social cycle theory developed in 1979 by Lenore E. Walker to explain patterns of behavior in an abusive relationship.

Overview[edit]

Lenore E. Walker interviewed 1,500 women who had been subject to domestic violence and found that there was a similar pattern of abuse, called the "cycle of abuse".[1] Initially, Walker proposed that the cycle of abuse described the controlling patriarchal behavior of men who felt entitled to abuse their wives to maintain control over them. Her terms "the battering cycle" and "battered woman syndrome" has since been largely eclipsed by "cycle of abuse" and "battered person syndrome," respectively, for many reasons: to maintain objectivity; because the cycle of abuse doesn't always lead to physical abuse; because symptoms of the syndrome have been observed in men and women, and are not confined to marriage and dating. Similarly, Dutton (1994) writes, "The prevalence of violence in homosexual relationships, which also appear to go through abuse cycles is hard to explain in terms of men dominating women."[2]

The cycle of abuse concept is widely used in domestic violence programs, particularly in the United States. Critics have argued the theory is flawed as it does not apply as universally as Walker suggested, does not accurately or completely describe all abusive relationships, and may favor ideological presumptions over empirical data.[3]

Phases[edit]

The cycle usually goes in the following order, and will repeat until the conflict is stopped, usually by the survivor entirely abandoning the relationship[4] or some form of intervention.[5] The cycle can occur hundreds of times in an abusive relationship, the total cycle taking anywhere from a few hours, to a year or more to complete. However, the length of the cycle usually diminishes over time so that the "reconciliation" and "calm" stages may disappear,[citation needed] violence becomes more intense and the cycles become more frequent.[5]

1: Tension building[edit]

Stress builds from the pressures of daily life, like conflict over children, marital issues, misunderstandings, or other family conflicts. It also builds as the result of illness, legal or financial problems, unemployment, or catastrophic events, like floods, rape or war.[5] During this period, the abuser feels ignored, threatened, annoyed or wronged. The feeling lasts on average several minutes to hours, it may last as much as several months.[6]

To prevent violence, the victim may try to reduce the tension by becoming compliant and nurturing. Or, to get the abuse over with, prepare for the violence or lessen the degree of injury, the victim may provoke the batterer. "However, at no time is the batterer justified in engaging in violent or abusive behavior," said Scott Allen Johnson, author of Physicial Abusers and Sexual Offenders.[6]

This phase occurs prior to an overtly abusive act, and is characterized by poor communication, passive aggression, rising interpersonal tension, and fear of causing outbursts in one's partner.

2: Acting-out[edit]

Characterized by outbursts of violent, abusive incidents which may be preceded by verbal abuse[5] and include psychological abuse.[6] During this stage the abuser attempts to dominate his/her partner (survivor), with the use of domestic violence.

In intimate partner violence, children are negatively affected by having witnessed the violence and the partner's relationship degrades as well. The release of energy reduces the tension, and the abuser may feel or express that the victim "had it coming" to them.[5]

3: Reconciliation/honeymoon[edit]

The perpetrator may begin to feel remorse, guilty feelings, or fear that their partner will leave or call the police. The victim feels pain, fear, humiliation, disrespect, confusion, and may wrongly feel responsible.[5]

Characterized by affection, apology, or, alternatively, ignoring the incident. This phase marks an apparent end of violence, with assurances that it will never happen again, or that the abuser will do his or her best to change. During this stage the abuser feels overwhelming feelings of remorse and sadness, or at least pretends to. Some abusers walk away from the situation with little comment, but most will eventually shower the survivor with love and affection. The abuser may use self-harm or threats of suicide to gain sympathy and/or prevent the survivor from leaving the relationship. Abusers are frequently so convincing, and survivors so eager for the relationship to improve, that survivors who are often worn down and confused by longstanding abuse, stay in the relationship.[7][8]

Although it is easy to see the outbursts of the Acting-out Phase as abuse, even the more pleasant behaviours of the Honeymoon Phase perpetuates the abuse because the survivor then sees that the relationship isn't all bad.

4: Calm[edit]

During this phase (which is often considered an element of the honeymoon/reconciliation phase), the relationship is relatively calm and peaceable. During this period the abuser may agree to engage in counseling, ask for forgiveness, and create a normal atmosphere. In intimate partner relationships, the perpetrator may buy presents or the couple may engage in passionate sex.[5] Over time, the batterer's apologies and requests for forgiveness become less sincere and are generally stated to prevent separation or intervention.[6]

However, interpersonal difficulties will inevitably arise, leading again to the tension building phase.[5]

The effect of the continual cycle may include loss of love, contempt, distress, and/or physical disability. Intimate partners may separate, divorce or, at the extreme, someone may be killed.[5]

Critiques[edit]

Walker's cycle of abuse theory was regarded as a revolutionary and important concept in the study of abuse and interpersonal violence,[3] which is a useful model, but may be simplistic. For instance, Scott Allen Johnson developed a 14 stage cycle that broke down the tension-building, acting-out and calm stages further. For instance, there are six stages in the "escalation" or tension building stage, which includes triggers, the victim feeling victimized, angry and depressed, isolation and revenge planning. These leads up to the assault by acting out the revenge plan, self-destructive behavior, victim grooming and the actual physical and/or sexual assault. This is followed by a sense of relief, fear of consequences, distraction, and rationalization of abuse.[9]

Donald Dutton and Susan Golant agree that Walker's cycle of abuse accurately describes all cyclically abusive relationships they studied. Nonetheless, they also note that her initial research was based almost entirely on anecdotal data from a rather small set of women who were in violent relationships.[3] Walker herself wrote, "These women were not randomly selected and they cannot be considered a legitimate data base from which to make specific generalizations."[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonnie S. Fisher; Steven P. Lab. Encyclopedia of Victimology and Crime Prevention. SAGE Publications; 2 February 2010. ISBN 978-1-4129-6047-2. p. 257.
  2. ^ Dutton, Donald G. (1994). "Patriarchy And Wife Assault: The Ecological Fallacy". Violence and Victims 9 (2): 167–182. 
  3. ^ a b c Dutton, Donald G. and Susan Golant. 1997. The Batterer: A Psychological Profile. 0465033881
  4. ^ Bancroft, Lundy. Why does he do that? Inside the minds of angry and controlling men Berkley Publishing Group 2002 ISBN 0-399-14844-2
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Willis C. Newman; Esmeralda Newman. Domestic Violence: Causes and Cures and Anger Management. Willis Newman; 12 May 2010. ISBN 978-1-4528-4323-0. p. 9.
  6. ^ a b c d Scott Allen Johnson. Physical Abusers and Sexual Offenders: Forensic and Clinical Strategies. CRC Press; 13 July 2006. ISBN 978-0-8493-7259-9. p. 31.
  7. ^ a b Walker, Lenore E. (1979) The Battered Woman. New York: Harper and Row.
  8. ^ Brewster, Susan Helping her get free Seal Press 2006 ISBN 1-58005-167-7
  9. ^ Scott Allen Johnson. Physical Abusers and Sexual Offenders: Forensic and Clinical Strategies. CRC Press; 13 July 2006. ISBN 978-0-8493-7259-9. p. 33–35.

Further reading[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Engel, Beverly Breaking the Cycle of Abuse: How to Move Beyond Your Past to Create an Abuse-Free Future (2005)
  • Biddix, Brenda FireEagle Inside the Pain: (a survivors guide to breaking the cycles of abuse and domestic violence) (2006)
  • Hameen, Latifah Suffering In Silence: Breaking the Cycle of Abuse (2006)
  • Hegstrom, Paul Angry Men and the Women Who Love Them: Breaking the Cycle of Physical and Emotional Abuse (2004)
  • Herbruck, Christine Comstock Breaking the cycle of child abuse (1979)
  • Marecek, Mary Breaking Free from Partner Abuse: Voices of Battered Women Caught in the Cycle of Domestic Violence (1999)
  • Mills, Linda G. Violent Partners: A Breakthrough Plan for Ending the Cycle of Abuse (2008)
  • Ney, Philip G. & Peters, Anna Ending the Cycle of Abuse: The Stories of Women Abused As Children & the Group Therapy Techniques That Helped Them Heal (1995)
  • Pugh, Roxanne Deliverance from the Vicious Cycle of Abuse (2007)
  • Quinn, Phil E. Spare the Rod: Breaking the Cycle of Child Abuse (Parenting/Social Concerns and Issues) (1988)
  • Smullens, SaraKay Setting Yourself Free :Breaking the Cycle of Emtional Abuse in Family, Friendships, Work and Love (2002)
  • Waldfogel, Jane The Future of Child Protection: How to Break the Cycle of Abuse and Neglect (2001)
  • Wiehe, Vernon R. What Parents Need to Know About Sibling Abuse: Breaking the Cycle of Violence (2002)

Academic journals[edit]

  • Coxe, R & Holmes, W A study of the cycle of abuse among child molesters. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, v10 n4 p111-18 2001
  • Dodge, K. A., Bates, J. E. and Pettit, G. S. (1990) Mechanisms in the cycle of violence. Science, 250: 1678-1681.
  • Egeland, B., Jacobvitz, D., & Sroufe, L. A. (1988). Breaking the cycle of abuse: Relationship predictors. Child Development, 59(4), 1080-1088.
  • Egeland, B & Erickson, M - Rising above the past: Strategies for helping new mothers break the cycle of abuse and neglect. Zero to Three 1990, 11(2):29-35.
  • Egeland, B. (1993) A history of abuse is a major risk factor for abusing the next generation. In: R. J. Gelles and D. R. Loseke (eds) Current controversies on family violence. Newbury Park, Calif.; London: Sage.
  • Furniss, Kathleen K. Ending the cycle of abuse: what behavioral health professionals need to know about domestic violence.: An article from: Behavioral Healthcare (2007)
  • Glasser, M & Campbell, D & Glasser, A & Leitch I & Farrelly S Cycle of child sexual abuse: links between being a victim and becoming a perpetrator The British Journal of Psychiatry (2001) 179: 482-494
  • Kirn, Timothy F. Sexual abuse cycle can be broken, experts assert.(Psychiatry): An article from: Internal Medicine News (2008)
  • Quayle, E Taylor, M - Child pornography and the Internet: Perpetuating a cycle of abuse Deviant Behavior, Volume 23, Issue 4 July 2002, pages 331 - 361
  • Stone, AE & Fialk, RJ Criminalizing the exposure of children to family violence: Breaking the cycle of abuse 20 Harv. Women's L.J. 205, Spring, 1997
  • Woods, J Breaking the cycle of abuse and abusing: Individual psychotherapy for juvenile sex Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol. 2, No. 3, 379-392 (1997)

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_of_abuse — Please support Wikipedia.
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842 news items

 
Huffington Post
Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:33:45 -0700

Likewise, the cycle of abuse casts a wide net. Its victims are not merely the recipient of the bruised face or broken bones, but collateral damage is done to the children who witness the violence. Rihanna grew up watching her father abuse her mother.

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Wed, 10 Sep 2014 05:27:01 -0700

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New York Daily News

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Tampabay.com
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:37:31 -0700

Britain's deputy prime minister on Thursday added his voice to the host of others calling for the South Yorkshire police commissioner to resign over a damning child abuse scandal in the town of Rotherham. (Aug. 28). Share Video; Link & Embed. Furor ...

The Guardian

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Thu, 04 Sep 2014 06:33:44 -0700

When refuges close down the cycle of abuse against women continues. 60 comments. Without proper support, women are unable to escape violent partners. We must act now. The silhouette of a woman. 'When there are no refuge places available, abused ...

Mic

Mic
Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:35:01 -0700

These lessons about gender roles — the unfortunate and oppressive stereotypes about masculinity and femininity — fuel the vicious cycle of abuse. A who's who of Australian celebrities appear thorughout the PSA, calling attention to the horrifying ...

The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:15:00 -0700

The federal government has released details of its plan to address the issue of violence against aboriginal women and girls. Labour Minister Kellie Leitch, who is also Minister for the Status of Women, says the plan consists of a range of measures to ...
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