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Not to be confused with Corydalus.
Corydalis
Corydalis solida - Bois d'Havré (1).jpg
Corydalis solida (type species)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Papaveraceae
Subfamily: Fumarioideae
Tribe: Fumariaceae
Subtribe: Corydalinae
Genus: Corydalis
DC
Species

See text.

Corydalis (Greek korydalís "crested lark") is a genus of about 470 species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants in the Papaveraceae family, native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere and the high mountains of tropical eastern Africa. They are most diverse in China and the Himalayas, with at least 357 species in China.

Ecology[edit]

Corydalis species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species (butterflies), especially the Mnemosyne.

Toxicity[edit]

Corydalis cava and some other tuberous species contain the alkaloid bulbocapnine, which is occasionally used in medicine but scientific evidence is lacking in the correct dosages and side effects.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Current species[edit]

There are about 470 species, including:

Former species[edit]

Several former Corydalis have been moved to new genera:

Pseudofumaria
Capnoides

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CORYDALIS". WebMD. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalis — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

549 news items

 
Wicked Local
Sat, 06 Feb 2016 10:56:15 -0800

Primroses, corydalis, spotted and silver-tinted lungworts (Pulmonaria) and patches of biennial foxgloves and forget-me-nots offer additional touches of color in our shady borders. Page 2 of 2 - In sunnier locales, low mats of creeping phlox and ...
 
BMC Blogs Network
Thu, 15 Oct 2015 05:22:30 -0700

Corydalis bungeana Turcz. (CB; family: Corydalis DC.) is an anti-inflammatory medicinal herb used widely in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for upper respiratory tract infection, etc., but its anti-inflammatory active molecules are unknown. This ...
 
The Observer Star
Sat, 06 Feb 2016 17:16:44 -0800

Esophageal rupture Christine Young, MS4 Paul Lewis, MD Patient presentation • CC: Substernal and Epigastric pain • HPI: Pt is a 80 yo M with. Esophageal rupture Christine Young, MS4 Paul Lewis, MD Patient presentation • CC: Substernal and Epigastric ...

Decoded Science

Decoded Science
Sun, 10 Jan 2016 03:10:19 -0800

In 2014, the journal Current Biology published the conclusions of research conducted by the Herbalome Project on a chemical compound called dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB), which is found in the underground tubers of the Corydalis plant. The study ...
 
To Your Health
Tue, 03 Jun 2014 11:11:15 -0700

Natural Pain Control: The Power of Corydalis. By Dr. Mark Reps. Many chronic pain patients are prescribed pain-control medications such as codeine, morphine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Unfortunately, there are often significant ...

Medical Daily

Medical Daily
Thu, 02 Jan 2014 15:05:22 -0800

The new study, which is published in the journal Current Biology, sought to quantify the effect of the plant Corydalis — a traditional Chinese remedy that has been used to treat headaches, back pain, and other ailments for centuries. The authors ...
 
Dynamic Chiropractic
Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:22:30 -0700

Corydalis is commonly used clinically for back pain (including back pain of spinal origin that has a nerve irritation or muscle spasm component), headaches, inflammation and menstrual pain. Animal studies suggest Corydalis may block inflammation and ...

The Seattle Times

The Seattle Times
Thu, 22 May 2014 06:19:25 -0700

Blue-flowering Corydalis, related to poppies, is among the most attractive of spring-blooming perennials. The botanical name means crested lark and refers to the birdlike appearance of the attractive flowers that appear en masse above ferny foliage.
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