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Not to be confused with Corydalus.
Corydalis
Corydalis solida - Bois d'Havré (1).jpg
Corydalis solida (type species)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Papaveraceae
Subfamily: Fumarioideae
Tribe: Fumarieae
Subtribe: Corydalinae
Genus: Corydalis
Species

See text.

Corydalis (Greek korydalís "crested lark") is a genus of about 470 species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants in the Papaveraceae family, native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere and the high mountains of tropical eastern Africa. They are most diverse in China and the Himalayas, with at least 357 species in China.

Ecology[edit]

Corydalis species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species (butterflies), especially of the genus Mnemosyne.

Toxicity[edit]

Corydalis cava and some other tuberous species contain the alkaloid bulbocapnine, which is occasionally used in medicine but scientific evidence is lacking in the correct dosages and side effects.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Current species[edit]

There are about 470 species, including:

Former species[edit]

Several former Corydalis have been moved to new genera:

Pseudofumaria
Capnoides

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CORYDALIS". WebMD. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalis — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

421 news items

The Sudbury Star

The Sudbury Star
Sun, 28 Jun 2015 21:52:30 -0700

Supplied photo The pale corydalis is a flirty flower, with its long, slender bloom — akin to a pinky finger — topped by a sunny burst of yellow. Very dignified, but surprisingly hearty and well-suited to the rocky outcrops that punctuate regional ...
 
The Denver Post
Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:00:00 -0700

Rain-soaked and hail-smashed veronicas look especially bad, but I also need to recover paths and stepping stones from happy moss phlox, catmint, basket-of-gold (both annual and alyssum types), candytuft, vinca, lamiastrum, corydalis, marrubium, thymes ...
 
Steuben Courier (blog)
Wed, 24 Jun 2015 21:54:05 -0700

Some of the plants that you can spot in the wall are: columbine, yellow and white corydalis, bellflowers, geraniums, both native and Dalmatian, and the yellow Welsh poppy. In one shot I am pointing to the pagoda dogwood and relating how birds strip the ...

Financial Times

Financial Times
Fri, 26 Jun 2015 07:37:30 -0700

The electrifyingly blue flowers on Corydalis flexuosa have now finished. The dark-backed petals on a mock orange blossom, Philadelphus delavayi, have never been so abundant. In mid-May I marvelled at huge bushes of wondrous blue-violet Rhododendron ...

Medical Daily

Medical Daily
Thu, 02 Jan 2014 15:05:22 -0800

The new study, which is published in the journal Current Biology, sought to quantify the effect of the plant Corydalis — a traditional Chinese remedy that has been used to treat headaches, back pain, and other ailments for centuries. The authors ...
 
Dynamic Chiropractic
Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:24:25 -0700

The compound in Corydalis, dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB), is believed to produce pain-relieving effects similar to prescription drugs by blocking pain signals in the brain.1 However, it does so naturally and does not carry the risk of addiction that many ...

Telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph.co.uk
Sat, 13 Jun 2015 23:05:46 -0700

From June 20 to 24, the Bishop's Palace in Wells, Somerset, will be staging its first ever Garden Festival. It is an event that will put its 14-acre garden properly on the horticultural map, for after more than 10 years of restoration and embellishment ...
 
To Your Health
Tue, 03 Jun 2014 11:11:15 -0700

Natural Pain Control: The Power of Corydalis. By Dr. Mark Reps. Many chronic pain patients are prescribed pain-control medications such as codeine, morphine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Unfortunately, there are often significant ...
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