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Not to be confused with Corydalus.
Corydalis
Corydalis solida - Bois d'Havré (1).jpg
Corydalis solida (type species)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Papaveraceae
Subfamily: Fumarioideae
Tribe: Fumarieae
Subtribe: Corydalinae
Genus: Corydalis
Species

See text.

Corydalis (Greek korydalís "crested lark") is a genus of about 470 species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants in the Papaveraceae family, native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere and the high mountains of tropical eastern Africa. They are most diverse in China and the Himalayas, with at least 357 species in China.

Ecology[edit]

Corydalis species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species (butterflies), especially of the genus Mnemosyne.

Toxicity[edit]

Corydalis cava and some other tuberous species contain the alkaloid bulbocapnine, which is occasionally used in medicine but scientific evidence is lacking in the correct dosages and side effects.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Current species[edit]

There are about 470 species, including:

Former species[edit]

Several former Corydalis have been moved to new genera:

Pseudofumaria
Capnoides

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CORYDALIS". WebMD. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalis — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

417 news items

Medical Daily

Medical Daily
Thu, 02 Jan 2014 15:05:22 -0800

The new study, which is published in the journal Current Biology, sought to quantify the effect of the plant Corydalis — a traditional Chinese remedy that has been used to treat headaches, back pain, and other ailments for centuries. The authors ...
 
To Your Health
Tue, 03 Jun 2014 11:11:15 -0700

Natural Pain Control: The Power of Corydalis. By Dr. Mark Reps. Many chronic pain patients are prescribed pain-control medications such as codeine, morphine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Unfortunately, there are often significant ...
 
Dynamic Chiropractic
Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:24:25 -0700

Corydalis is commonly used clinically for back pain (including back pain of spinal origin that has a nerve irritation or muscle spasm component), headaches, inflammation and menstrual pain. Animal studies suggest Corydalis may block inflammation and ...
 
The Seattle Times
Thu, 22 May 2014 06:19:25 -0700

Blue-flowering Corydalis, related to poppies, is among the most attractive of spring-blooming perennials. The botanical name means crested lark and refers to the birdlike appearance of the attractive flowers that appear en masse above ferny foliage.

TheChronicleHerald.ca

TheChronicleHerald.ca
Mon, 24 Aug 2015 10:57:09 -0700

Finely textured plants like ferns and corydalis have small, delicate, finely cut foliage whereas the bold leaves of hostas or gunnera have a coarse texture. Foliage works best when there are large groups of a single plant so that they can be 'read' as ...

NutraIngredients.com

NutraIngredients.com
Thu, 16 Jan 2014 07:13:40 -0800

A compound derived from the roots of the Chinese herbal medicine plant Corydalis yanhusuo may be effective at reducing pain, according to new research in rats. The research, led by researchers in the US and China suggests that the isolated compound ...
 
The Seattle Times
Thu, 04 Apr 2013 05:08:05 -0700

Corydalis tend to do best in well-drained soil and moist shade and will bloom from spring into early summer if given adequate moisture. After the blooms fade, cut the foliage down to about an inch. Your Corydalis probably won't rebloom, but the lacy ...

eMaxHealth

eMaxHealth
Thu, 30 Jan 2014 09:46:53 -0800

Corydalis is also known by the name “Chinese Poppy” and U.S. researchers have now extracted its active pain-killing ingredient referred to in medical circles as DHCB. DHCB works differently from other pain relievers by going to the dopamine receptors ...
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