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Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Noctule — Please support Wikipedia.
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37 news items

RedOrbit

RedOrbit
Tue, 17 Sep 2013 12:05:16 -0700

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human ...

RedOrbit

RedOrbit
Wed, 18 Sep 2013 13:56:57 -0700

This species is a red listed endangered species. The Azores noctule bat lives in the dry forests of the Portugal islands known as the Azores. The endangerment of this species is directly connected to the loss of their habitat caused my human growth ...

RedOrbit

RedOrbit
Wed, 18 Sep 2013 13:56:57 -0700

The greater noctule bat is found in Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. This species of bat is a tree-dweller and roosts in high, hollow, deciduous trees year round. However, the greater noctule bat will roost in pine trees if there is a shortage of ...
 
RedOrbit
Fri, 05 Dec 2014 08:43:54 -0800

Image Caption: In a discovery that overturns conventional wisdom about bats, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Dec. 4 have found that Old World fruit bats -- long classified as "non-echolocating" -- actually do use a ...

East London and West Essex Guardian Series

East London and West Essex Guardian Series
Fri, 15 Aug 2014 04:00:11 -0700

... Wanstead Park on September 4 at 7.30pm until around 10pm. The bat detectors work by picking up on the high frequency calls they emit. Species of bat known to inhabit the park include the common noctule, the Daubenton's bat and the Soprano Pipistrelle.

Wildlife Extra

Wildlife Extra
Wed, 23 Apr 2014 09:18:45 -0700

The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) has put a call out for volunteers to help with this year's bat survey in Norfolk. The Norfolk Bat Survey (www.batsurvey.org) was very successful in collecting valuable information about bats in the county in 2013 ...

RedOrbit

RedOrbit
Sat, 29 Mar 2014 03:40:48 -0700

Image Caption: University of Maryland researchers have learned that male big brown bats in flight use a special call, different from the echolocation calls they use for navigation, to warn other foraging males away from insect prey that they are ...

RedOrbit

RedOrbit
Thu, 13 Mar 2014 07:55:11 -0700

Fringe-lipped Bat, Trachops cirrhosus · Brandt's Bat, Myitus brandtii · Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula · Pygmy Killer Whale, Feresa attenuata · Crabeater Seal, Lobodon carcinophagus · Pilot whale · Cetology · Dall's Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz ...
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