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A traditional homemade cold frame

In agriculture and gardening, a cold frame is a transparent-roofed enclosure, built low to the ground, used to protect plants from adverse weather, primarily excessive cold or wet. The transparent top admits sunlight and prevents heat escape via convection that would otherwise occur, particularly at night. Essentially, a cold frame functions as a miniature greenhouse to extend the growing season.

Historically cold frames were built to be used in addition to a heated greenhouse. The name itself exemplifies the distinction between the warm greenhouse and the unheated cold frame. They were frequently built as part of the greenhouse's foundation brickwork along the southern wall (in northern latitudes). This allowed seeds to be germinated in the greenhouse and then easily moved to the attached cold frame to be "hardened-off"[1] before final planting outside.[2] Cold frames are similar to some enclosed hotbeds,[3] also called hotboxes. The difference is in the amount of heat generated inside. This is parallel to the way that some greenhouses are called "hothouses" to emphasize their higher temperature, achieved either by the solar effects alone or by auxiliary heating via a heater or HVAC system of some kind.

Cold frames are found in home gardens and in vegetable farming. They create microclimates that provide several degrees of air and soil temperature insulation, and shelter from wind. In cold-winter regions, these characteristics allow plants to be started earlier in the spring, and to survive longer into the fall and winter. They are most often used for growing seedlings that are later transplanted into open ground, and can also be a permanent home to cold-hardy vegetables grown for autumn and winter harvest.

Construction[edit]

Cold frame construction is a common home or farm building project, although kits and commercial systems are available. A traditional plan makes use of old glass windows: a wooden frame is built, about one to two feet tall, and the window placed on top. The roof is often sloped towards the winter sun to capture more light, and to improve runoff of water, and hinged for easy access. Clear plastic, rigid or sheeting, can be used in place of glass. An electric heating cable, available for this purpose, can be placed in the soil to provide additional heat.

Uses[edit]

Cold frames can be used to extend the growing season for many food and ornamental crops, primarily by providing increased warmth in early spring. This means that it's possible to harvest vegetable crops ahead of their normal season when they are extremely expensive to buy. Some crops suitable for growing in a cold frame include lettuces, parsley, salad onions, spinach, radishes and turnips etc. One vegetable crop can occupy the whole of a cold frame or a combination of crops can be grown so that they mature in rotation in order to get a wide range of different vegetables throughout the year from a single cold frame.

Bulb frame[edit]

A "bulb frame" is a specialized kind of cold frame, designed for growing hardy or almost hardy ornamental bulbous plants, particularly in climates with wet winters. Typically it is raised further above ground level than a normal cold frame, so that the plants can be seen better when in flower. They are often used for the cultivation of winter-growing bulbs which flower in the autumn or spring. The covers are used in winter to provide some protection from very bad weather, while allowing good ventilation. Then in the summer, the covers provide dry, warm conditions which many such bulbs need.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ coldframe.org.uk
  2. ^ "A brief history of cold frames". coldframe.org.uk. 
  3. ^ merriam-webster.com
  4. ^ Mathew, Brian (1997). Growing Bulbs : The Complete Practical Guide. London: Batsford. ISBN 978-0-7134-4920-4.  Pp. 32–34

External links[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_frame — Please support Wikipedia.
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93 news items

 
GoLocal Worcester
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 07:37:30 -0700

A cold frame is usually a temporary shelter for those months when freezing temperatures are likely and beyond. Mine are made of mostly found materials: last fall's bales of hay that surrounded the compost heap are still cohesive. I used four bales to ...
 
SouthCoastToday.com
Sat, 19 Apr 2014 21:30:00 -0700

Started from seeds in their cold frame, the eye-catching annuals like chrysanthemums, zinnias and others are sold to mainly to D-I-Y wedding planners, the couple noted. The biggest sales gateway for their Certified Organic fare is one of two farmers ...
 
Montana Standard
Mon, 14 Apr 2014 00:07:40 -0700

Essentially a cold frame is a raised bed with a cover. Consider what you are planting to determine how elaborate your structure needs to be. Use materials that are available such as the old windows. If old windows are not available then a heavy plastic ...
 
The Journal News / Lohud.com
Thu, 17 Apr 2014 21:07:30 -0700

Flowers: If the weather is mild, hardy annual seedlings may be moved to a cold frame to harden off. Make sure to close the cover on cold nights, and open it on warm days. Vegetables and fruits: Continue planting onions, carrots, beets, broccoli and ...
 
The Coloradoan
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 21:11:25 -0700

You can plant outside earlier by protecting them in a cold frame or with row covers. • Perennials that flower in mid- to late-summer and fall, such as chrysanthemums, asters, daisies and phlox can be divided in the spring. Spring and early summer ...

South Wales Argus (blog)

South Wales Argus (blog)
Sat, 19 Apr 2014 03:52:30 -0700

While a small greenhouse makes growing easier, windowsills and a homemade cold-frame will provide loads of plants for the allotment. Even with a greenhouse, April is the time where growing space can be an issue for me. Brassicas sown last month are ...

State-Journal.com

State-Journal.com
Sat, 22 Mar 2014 20:11:03 -0700

I have discovered in the past several years of gardening if there's one thing I absolutely will not do without it is the versatile cold frame. If you want to begin, extend and enhance your gardening season then build or buy and use one. With a little ...
 
The Union of Grass Valley
Sat, 19 Apr 2014 00:52:30 -0700

Volunteer red Russian kale has germinated in my cold frame. While I prefer to grow this as a winter vegetable, so tasty after a frost, these seedlings will provide some greens before the summer heat. Recently I visited a friend's shady garden off ...
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