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Coconut jam
Coconut jam.jpg
A Pandan flavour coconut jam
Alternative names
Srikaya, kaya
Place of origin
Malaysia
Main ingredients
Coconut, sugar, eggs
Cookbook:Coconut jam  Coconut jam

Kaya, Serikaya or Srikaya (Malay: kaya; Indonesian: seri kaya; Tagalog: matamís sa báo, matamís na báo, or kalamay-hatì; Hokkien: 咖吔 ka-ia) is wildly popular in Southeast Asia, mainly in Malaysia and Singapore. It is a food spread, a fruit curd made from a base of coconut milk, eggs and sugar. The word kaya means rich in the Malay language and hence represents the texture of this popular food.

Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore[edit]

A close-up to Kaya.

Kaya, also called Srikaya or coconut egg jam, is a sweet creamy coconut spread made from coconut milk (also known as santan), duck or chicken eggs which are flavored by pandan leaf and sweetened with sugar. The colour varies depending on the colour of the egg yolks, the amount of pandan and extent of caramelisation of the sugar. As a popular local spread, kaya is typically spread on toast to make kaya toast and eaten in the morning[1] but is enjoyed throughout the day.

Different varieties available include nyonya kaya,[2] which is a lighter green colour, and Hainanese kaya, which is a darker brown and uses caramalised sugar,[3] and is often further sweetened with honey.

Kaya is used as a topping for several desserts including pulut taitai or pulut tekan, a dessert of sweet glutinous rice coloured blue with butterfly pea flowers (bunga telang), and pulut seri muka, a similar dessert but coloured green with pandan leaves. It is also used with glutinous rice to make kuih seri kaya.

Philippines[edit]

Philippine coconut jam is made from coconut cream (the first and second press of grated coconut meat) and cane sugar extract or molasses (treacle). It is often eaten on toast or pandesal and is used to make kalamay.

Thailand[edit]

Main article: Coconut custard

Sangkhaya (Thai: สังขยา, pronounced [sǎŋkʰàjǎː]) is a similar concoction but it has a less sticky and more custard-like texture. It is sometimes called "coconut custard" in English and is used to make sangkhaya fakthong (สังขยาฟักทอง,  [sǎŋkʰàjǎː fáktʰɔ̄ːŋ]; sangkhaya maryu in Lao), sangkhaya pumpkin or custard pumpkin, khao niao sangkhaya (ข้าวเหนียวสังขยา,  [kʰâːw nǐaw sǎŋkʰàjǎː]), glutinous rice with sangkhaya, and sangkhaya maphrao (สังขยามะพร้าว,  [sǎŋkʰàjǎː māpʰráːw]), sangkhaya served in a coconut.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]



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