digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:
 

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

35 news items

The Week Magazine

The Week Magazine
Tue, 18 Aug 2015 02:14:28 -0700

American writer Herman Melville's experience as a sailor on a merchant ship and on an 18-month whaling voyage provided fodder for his most famous novels, including Typee, Omoo, and of course Moby Dick. Such seafaring accounts put into print nautical ...

Reason (blog)

Reason (blog)
Tue, 27 Oct 2015 09:47:55 -0700

dashcamIn July, 19-year-old Zachary Hammond was shot and killed in a Hardee's parking lot by a police officer in Seneca, S.C. after an undercover narcotics offered lured 23-year-old Toni Morton, Hammond's date, there to sell marijuana. After Hammond ...

The Hockey Writers

The Hockey Writers
Thu, 03 Sep 2015 15:34:52 -0700

... which is pretty much how the language works. You aren't supposed to say ain't or irregardless or impactful either, but everyone does. Jibe itself is a nautical slang term anyways, so I don't know if you can even be wrong if you're using the wrong ...

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times
Tue, 30 Dec 2014 14:42:48 -0800

Nautical slang, which became one of the most widespread euphemisms for drunkenness. The "sheets" are ropes attached to the lower corners of a sail, to keep it steady, so if three of them come loose, the flapping sails will cause the ship to move ...
 
OUPblog (blog)
Wed, 03 Dec 2014 05:33:01 -0800

My half-baked reconstruction resolves itself into the following. Among the rather numerous variants of the word yeah, the variant aye (that is, i or I) developed among British sailors and became part of international nautical slang. Later, landlubbers ...

History

History
Thu, 05 Jul 2012 04:00:34 -0700

Although we may never know whether the expression really figured prominently in nautical slang, “shiver” meant “break into pieces” in Old English, while “timbers” referred to a ship's support frames. So “Shiver me timbers!” roughly translates to “May ...

Bustle

Bustle
Tue, 05 Aug 2014 04:08:11 -0700

"You're going to New York?!" said my grandma, as I hung up the phone after checking on my flight information. "Um, sort of," I replied. More accurately, I was going to New York for approximately 20 minutes, after which I'd board the Celebrity Summit, ...
 
The Seattle Times
Wed, 12 Feb 2014 18:59:26 -0800

(A “highliner,” in nautical slang, is an elite, prolific fisherman.) “This is very much a living history” said University of Washington history professor Bruce Hevly, whose students did research that helped shape the exhibit. Hevly's students explored ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight