digplanet beta 1: Athena
Share digplanet:

Agriculture

Applied sciences

Arts

Belief

Business

Chronology

Culture

Education

Environment

Geography

Health

History

Humanities

Language

Law

Life

Mathematics

Nature

People

Politics

Science

Society

Technology

The BC-348 is a compact American-made communications receiver, which was mass-produced during World War II for the U.S. Army Air Force. Under the Joint Army-Navy nomenclature system, the receiver system became known as the AN/ARR-11.

BC 348 radio receiver

History[edit]

The BC-348 is the 28 vdc powered version of the 14 vdc powered BC-224. The first version, the BC-224-A, was produced in 1936. Installed in almost all USAAF (and some USN, some British and some Canadian) multi-engined transports and bombers used during the fifteen year period from before World War II through the Korean War, BC-348 radio receivers were easy to operate and reliable. Designed as LF/MF/HF receivers for use in larger aircraft (B-17, B-24, B-25, B-26, B-29, C-47, etc.), they were initially paired with a BC-375 transmitter in the SCR-287-A system. Late in World War II, the AN/ARR-11 (BC-348) was the receiver and the AN/ART-13A (ART-13) was the transmitter in the AN/ARC-8 system.

Russian version on IL-14 aircraft.

They were also used in some ground and mobile installations such as the AN/MRC-20.[1] The BC-348 series ran to several variations during its long production history, which included the BC-224. More than 100,000 of these receivers were produced, 80 percent by Belmont Radio and Wells-Gardner and the balance by RCA and Stromberg-Carlson. BC-348 receivers were copied and manufactured by the U.S.S.R. following War II by the Russian Vefon Works and labeled УС-9 (US-9 in English, US as Universal Superheterodyne, not United States.) The УС-9 continued to be produced in the Soviet Union through the 1970s, with such improvements as a solid state inverter to replace the dynamotor.[2]

Enola Gay, the B-29 Superfortress bomber that dropped "Little Boy", the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan was equipped with the AN/ARC-8 system.[3] Today, many examples of the BC-348 are restored and operated by vintage and military amateur radio enthusiasts.[4]

The AN/ARC-8 system was still in service in older USAF aircraft in the early 1970s. At that time, military surplus dealers near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona, had stacks of the BC-348, that had been removed from aircraft, for sale to the public at $17 each.

Specifications[edit]

BC 224 version

The BC-224-A, -B, -C, and -D; and the BC-348-B, and -C, tuned 1.5-18 MHz in six bands. The Signal Corps had the receiver design modified to add a 200-500 kHz band and compress the 1.5-18 MHz coverage into the remaining five bands. This modified design became the BC-224-E and the BC-348-E. The 200–500 kHz and 1.5-18 MHz tuning range remained constant for subsequent production of all models.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.vmarsmanuals.co.uk/new/bc348.htm Vintage & Military Amateur Radio Society Technical Information Service
  2. ^ a b http://nj7p.org/history/bc-348.html BC-224 AND BC-348 AIRCRAFT RADIO RECEIVERS
  3. ^ http://aafradio.org/flightdeck/b29.htm U.S. Military Aircraft Avionics from 1939 to 1945
  4. ^ http://www.vmarsmanuals.co.uk/ VMARS Technical Information Service

General references[edit]

  • U. S. Army Signal Corps Technical Order No. 08-10-24, 12 June 1936, Instruction Book for Radio Receiver BC-224-A manufactured by RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., Camden, N.J., U.S.A., Order No. SC-132373
  • Army Air Forces Technical Order No. 08-10-119, December 15, 1942; Instruction Book for Operation and Maintenance of Radio Receiver BC-348-E Radio Receiver BC-348-M Radio Receiver BC-348-P
  • U.S. Air Force Technical Order 12R2-3BC348-2, revised 15 April 1957; was AN 16-40BC-348-3, 21 June 1948; was AN 08-10-112, 17 July 1943, revised 18 December 1943, revised 30 July 1945; Handbook Maintenance Instructions Radio Receivers BC-348-J BC-348-N BC-348-Q
  • U.S. Air Force Technical Order 12R2-3BC-112, revised 15 April 1957; was AN 16-40BC224-2, 20 July 1945, revised 11 May 1948; Handbook Maintenance Instructions Radio Receivers BC-224-F BC-224-K BC-348-H BC-348-K BC-348-L BC-348-R

See also[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BC-348 — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

613 news items

Brazosport Facts (subscription)

Brazosport Facts (subscription)
Tue, 11 Aug 2015 23:56:15 -0700

1 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language. PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK. 2 Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. 3 Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or ...

WSHU

WSHU
Tue, 19 May 2015 11:54:01 -0700

After WWII, it sustained a growth period selling surplus electronic gear, such as the BC-348 receiver that I featured in my October 2014 article. Competitors Allied Electronics and Lafayette Electronics also found the military surplus market to be ...

WSHU

WSHU
Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:13:20 -0700

The BC-348 was the main receiver on the B-17. It was paired with the BC-375 transmitter to provide two way communications. The BC-348 was an upgraded version of the BC-224, originally designed in 1936. The earlier version was designed to work on 12 to ...

The Hindu

The Hindu
Thu, 12 Feb 2015 05:31:19 -0800

Also in Farhan's possession is a BC-348. It was produced by the American Air Force and flown on almost every war plane during the World War. However, for many, radio brings in a lot of nostalgia. Promiti Phukan, a music teacher, says the radio was her ...
 
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Tue, 19 Aug 2014 12:07:38 -0700

He'd like to hear from any Rochester-area women (or their relatives) who worked on the assembly lines at Stromberg-Carlson in Rochester during World War II helping produce the BC-348 military radio receiver. According to Hopkins, the receiver went into ...
 
eHam.net
Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:18:45 -0700

Some key pieces on display include a 1907 spark transmitter/crystal detector set, a Collins 4A crystal controlled transmitter from 1935, a Russian-made BC-348 receiver, a Cosmophone 35 SSB transceiver from 1959, a TEN-TEC Century 22 solid state CW ...
 
Times of India
Thu, 10 Jul 2014 03:07:32 -0700

Plato (Greek Philosopher, 428 BC- 348 BC) Encourage those working under you to get better results. 9) "I don't care what people say about me. I do care about my mistakes." - Socrates (Greek Philosopher, 470 BC- 399 BC) Never allow the judgment of ...
 
CNN (blog)
Thu, 23 Feb 2012 17:00:18 -0800

Washington (CNN) - Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani, an Iranian Christian charged with leaving Islam, has received a local trial courts final verdict, according to sources close to his legal team, and may now be executed for leaving Islam. Jodran Sekulow ...
Loading

Oops, we seem to be having trouble contacting Twitter

Support Wikipedia

A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia. Please add your support for Wikipedia!

Searchlight Group

Digplanet also receives support from Searchlight Group. Visit Searchlight