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The BC-348 is a compact American-made communications receiver, which was mass-produced during World War II for the U.S. Army Air Force. Under the Joint Army-Navy nomenclature system, the receiver system became known as the AN/ARR-11.

BC 348 radio receiver

History[edit]

The BC-348 is the 28 vdc powered version of the 14 vdc powered BC-224. The first version, the BC-224-A, was produced in 1936. Installed in almost all USAAF (and some USN, some British and some Canadian) multi-engined transports and bombers used during the fifteen year period from before World War II through the Korean War, BC-348 radio receivers were easy to operate and reliable. Designed as LF/MF/HF receivers for use in larger aircraft (B-17, B-24, B-25, B-26, B-29, C-47, etc.), they were initially paired with a BC-375 transmitter in the SCR-287-A system. Late in World War II, the AN/ARR-11 (BC-348) was the receiver and the AN/ART-13A (ART-13) was the transmitter in the AN/ARC-8 system.

Russian version on IL-14 aircraft.

They were also used in some ground and mobile installations such as the AN/MRC-20.[1] The BC-348 series ran to several variations during its long production history, which included the BC-224. More than 100,000 of these receivers were produced, 80 percent by Belmont Radio and Wells-Gardner and the balance by RCA and Stromberg-Carlson. BC-348 receivers were copied and manufactured by the U.S.S.R. following War II by the Russian Vefon Works and labeled УС-9 (US-9 in English, US as Universal Superheterodyne, not United States.) The УС-9 continued to be produced in the Soviet Union through the 1970s, with such improvements as a solid state inverter to replace the dynamotor.[2]

Enola Gay, the B-29 Superfortress bomber that dropped "Little Boy", the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan was equipped with the AN/ARC-8 system.[3] Today, many examples of the BC-348 are restored and operated by vintage and military amateur radio enthusiasts.[4]

The AN/ARC-8 system was still in service in older USAF aircraft in the early 1970s. At that time, military surplus dealers near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona, had stacks of the BC-348, that had been removed from aircraft, for sale to the public at $17 each.

Specifications[edit]

BC 224 version

The BC-224-A, -B, -C, and -D; and the BC-348-B, and -C, tuned 1.5-18 MHz in six bands. The Signal Corps had the receiver design modified to add a 200-500 kHz band and compress the 1.5-18 MHz coverage into the remaining five bands. This modified design became the BC-224-E and the BC-348-E. The 200–500 kHz and 1.5-18 MHz tuning range remained constant for subsequent production of all models.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.vmarsmanuals.co.uk/new/bc348.htm Vintage & Military Amateur Radio Society Technical Information Service
  2. ^ a b http://nj7p.org/history/bc-348.html BC-224 AND BC-348 AIRCRAFT RADIO RECEIVERS
  3. ^ http://aafradio.org/flightdeck/b29.htm U.S. Military Aircraft Avionics from 1939 to 1945
  4. ^ http://www.vmarsmanuals.co.uk/ VMARS Technical Information Service

General references[edit]

  • U. S. Army Signal Corps Technical Order No. 08-10-24, 12 June 1936, Instruction Book for Radio Receiver BC-224-A manufactured by RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., Camden, N.J., U.S.A., Order No. SC-132373
  • Army Air Forces Technical Order No. 08-10-119, December 15, 1942; Instruction Book for Operation and Maintenance of Radio Receiver BC-348-E Radio Receiver BC-348-M Radio Receiver BC-348-P
  • U.S. Air Force Technical Order 12R2-3BC348-2, revised 15 April 1957; was AN 16-40BC-348-3, 21 June 1948; was AN 08-10-112, 17 July 1943, revised 18 December 1943, revised 30 July 1945; Handbook Maintenance Instructions Radio Receivers BC-348-J BC-348-N BC-348-Q
  • U.S. Air Force Technical Order 12R2-3BC-112, revised 15 April 1957; was AN 16-40BC224-2, 20 July 1945, revised 11 May 1948; Handbook Maintenance Instructions Radio Receivers BC-224-F BC-224-K BC-348-H BC-348-K BC-348-L BC-348-R

See also[edit]


Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BC-348 — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.
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BC-348 Modifications

Four easy modifications that can be added to a BC-348Q to make it a more practical for Ham radio or SWL use, Please note I started with a 348 that was allrea...

BC-348 restoration, WW2 Receiver , BC-348Q

instructional video on rebuilding and repairing tube type amateur radio equipment ,Example is a WW2 BC-348 aircraft radio restoration.This BC-348 the paint h...

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Video on a BC-348-Q just after it arrived. I've since re-capped it, built in a power supply, and have it up and running. Video was originally shot in 2008 fo...

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The BC-348-R Army Air Corp Receiver World War Two another American War Hero Radio that save lifes of our war heros.73's WD4AM Mike D. McCoy Lenoir, N.C. U.S....

1943 BC-348-Q WELLS GARDNER 001.AVI

Here is my 1943 Wells Gardner BC-348-Q, nice radio for being 68 years old. It has the ac 110v conversion and works pretty good. It is being used with a 40 me...

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The Elmac AF 68A and the BC-348 R Receiver all soild state mosfetts in the receiver Homebrew Power Supply for the Elmac with a roll around rack neat little A...

BC-348-R WW2 aircraft radio

This is my WW2 radio receiver BC-348-R first run after repair. BC-348 radio receivers were easy to operate and reliable. Designed as LF/MF/HF receivers for u...

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Bc-348 resolving very well 2 amateur am stations ... Good receiver indeed!

US Army Signal Corps BC-348-C HF Receiver

Made by RCA in Camden, NJ Order #1780-NY-41 Serial #2560.

145219 videos foundNext > 

1 news items

WSHU

WSHU
Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:13:20 -0700

The BC-348 was the main receiver on the B-17. It was paired with the BC-375 transmitter to provide two way communications. The BC-348 was an upgraded version of the BC-224, originally designed in 1936. The earlier version was designed to work on 12 to ...
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