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An arms race, in its original usage, is a competition between two or more parties to have the best armed forces. Each party competes to produce larger numbers of weapons, greater armies, superior military technology, etc. in a technological escalation.

International conflict specialist Alex Upton, defines the term as "the participation of two or more nation-states in apparently competitive or interactive increases in quantity or quality of war material and/or persons under arms."[1]

The term is also used to describe a competitive situation, in which the purpose is only to be more successful than ones competitors.

Examples of arms races[edit]

WWI naval arms race[edit]

The size and power of battleships grew rapidly before, during, and after World War I: a result of competitive shipbuilding among a number of naval powers, brought to an end by the Washington Naval Treaty

From the dates 1891 to 1919, an arms race between several European countries, including Germany, France, Russia, (as well as some other smaller countries,) took place. British concern about rapid increase in German naval power resulted in a costly building competition of Dreadnought-class ships. This tense arms race lasted until June 1914, when after two antagonistic power blocs were formed because of the rivalry, the World War broke out. If it weren't for this arms Race, World War I may never have taken place, as the governments of these nations would not have felt they had the military technology and navies to risk their citizens in the war. After the war, a new arms race developed among the victorious Allies. The Washington Naval Treaty was only partly able to put an end to the race.

Prior to WWI, a dreadnought arms race also took place in South America.

Nuclear arms race[edit]

Main article: Nuclear arms race

A nuclear arms race developed during the Cold War, an intense period between the Soviet Union and the United States. This was one of the main causes that began the cold war. On both sides, perceived advantages of the adversary (such as the "missile gap") led to large spending on armaments and the stockpiling of vast nuclear arsenals. Proxy wars were fought all over the world (e.g. in the Middle East, Korea, Vietnam) in which the superpowers' conventional weapons were pitted against each other. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, tensions decreased and the nuclear arsenal of both countries were reduced.

Other uses[edit]

More generically, the term "arms race" is used to describe any competition where there is no absolute goal, only the relative goal of staying ahead of the other competitors in rank or knowledge. An arms race may also imply futility as the competitors spend a great deal of time and money, yet end up in the same situation as if they had never started the arms race.

An evolutionary arms race is a system where two populations are evolving in order to continuously one-up members of the other population. An example of this is the escalation of drug resistance in pathogens, in step with the use of increasingly powerful drugs.

This is related to the Red Queen effect (Red Queen's Hypothesis#Arms race), where two organisms co-evolve to overcome each other but each fails to progress relative to the other interactant.

In technology, there are close analogues to the arms races between parasites and hosts, such as the arms race between computer virus writers and antivirus software writers, or spammers against Internet service providers and E-mail software writers.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Theresa Clair (1980). "Arms Race Instability and War" (PDF). Journal of Conflict Resolution (24): 253–284. 

Literature[edit]

  • Richard J. Barnet: Der amerikanische Rüstungswahn. Rowohlt, Reinbek 1984, ISBN 3-499-11450-X (German)
  • Jürgen Bruhn: Der Kalte Krieg oder: Die Totrüstung der Sowjetunion. Focus, Gießen 1995, ISBN 3-88349-434-8 (German)

Original courtesy of Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_race — Please support Wikipedia.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia. A portion of the proceeds from advertising on Digplanet goes to supporting Wikipedia.

969230 news items

Telegraph.co.uk

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Tue, 28 Jul 2015 14:32:56 -0700

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Bloomberg
Tue, 28 Jul 2015 10:15:00 -0700

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Press TV

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Mon, 27 Jul 2015 18:10:28 -0700

Russian President Vladimir Putin has blamed the United States for the current round of arms race in the world. "This new spiral of the arms race was prompted by the United States' unilateral withdrawal from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty,” Putin ...

ValueWalk

ValueWalk
Tue, 28 Jul 2015 04:26:15 -0700

Russian President Vladimir Putin blames the United States for restarting a new round of arms race. Meanwhile, Putin assured that Russia is not interested in having a confrontation against other countries. Putin expressed his hope that there will be no ...

The Spokesman Review (blog)

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Tue, 28 Jul 2015 05:56:15 -0700

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